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PrivHab: A privacy preserving georouting protocol based on a multiagent system for podcast distribution on disconnected areas

2016-10-04T09:14:01-00:00

Ad Hoc Networks (September 2016), doi:10.1016/j.adhoc.2016.09.019

We present PrivHab, a privacy preserving georouting protocol that improves multiagent decision-making. PrivHab learns the mobility habits of the nodes of the network. Then, it uses this information to dynamically select to route an agent carrying a piece of data to reach its destination. PrivHab makes use of cryptographic techniques from secure multi-party computation to make the decisions while preserving nodes’ privacy. PrivHab uses a waypoint-based routing that achieves a high performance and low overhead in rugged terrain areas that are plenty of physical obstacles. The store-carry-and-forward approach used is combined with mobile agents that provide intelligence, and it is designed to operate in areas that lack network infrastructure. We have evaluated PrivHab under the scope of a realistic podcast distribution application in remote rural areas, where these programs have to be recorded into a physical format and distributed to the local radio stations. The usage of PrivHab aims to reduce this spending of resources. The PrivHab protocol is compared with a set of well-known delay-tolerant routing algorithms and shown to outperform them.
Adrián Sánchez-Carmona, Sergi Robles, Carlos Borrego



Wikis, blogs and podcasts: a new generation of Web-based tools for virtual collaborative clinical practice and education

2016-02-16T20:06:48-00:00

BMC Medical Education, Vol. 6, No. 1. (1 December 2006), pp. 41-8, doi:10.1186/1472-6920-6-41

BACKGROUND:We have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of Web-based 'collaborationware' in recent years. These Web 2.0 applications, particularly wikis, blogs and podcasts, have been increasingly adopted by many online health-related professional and educational services. Because of their ease of use and rapidity of deployment, they offer the opportunity for powerful information sharing and ease of collaboration. Wikis are Web sites that can be edited by anyone who has access to them. The word 'blog' is a contraction of 'Web Log' - an online Web journal that can offer a resource rich multimedia environment. Podcasts are repositories of audio and video materials that can be "pushed" to subscribers, even without user intervention. These audio and video files can be downloaded to portable media players that can be taken anywhere, providing the potential for "anytime, anywhere" learning experiences (mobile learning).DISCUSSION:Wikis, blogs and podcasts are all relatively easy to use, which partly accounts for their proliferation. The fact that there are many free and Open Source versions of these tools may also be responsible for their explosive growth. Thus it would be relatively easy to implement any or all within a Health Professions' Educational Environment. Paradoxically, some of their disadvantages also relate to their openness and ease of use. With virtually anybody able to alter, edit or otherwise contribute to the collaborative Web pages, it can be problematic to gauge the reliability and accuracy of such resources. While arguably, the very process of collaboration leads to a Darwinian type 'survival of the fittest' content within a Web page, the veracity of these resources can be assured through careful monitoring, moderation, and operation of the collaborationware in a closed and secure digital environment. Empirical research is still needed to build our pedagogic evidence base about the different aspects of these tools in the context of medical/health education.SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:If effectively deployed, wikis, blogs and podcasts could offer a way to enhance students', clinicians' and patients' learning experiences, and deepen levels of learners' engagement and collaboration within digital learning environments. Therefore, research should be conducted to determine the best ways to integrate these tools into existing e-Learning programmes for students, health professionals and patients, taking into account the different, but also overlapping, needs of these three audience classes and the opportunities of virtual collaboration between them. Of particular importance is research into novel integrative applications, to serve as the "glue" to bind the different forms of Web-based collaborationware synergistically in order to provide a coherent wholesome learning experience.
Maged Boulos, Inocencio Maramba, Steve Wheeler



Podcasting: Exploring the Possibilities for Academic Libraries

2015-10-12T20:43:11-00:00

pp. 87-91

Podcasting is a recent phenomenon on the Internet, which offers academic libraries an alternative channel for communication with faculty and students. This paper describes podcasting, and offers examples of its use in academic and public libraries. The paper concludes with a description of the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries' experiences in creating a podcast and suggestions for libraries considering podcasting. doi:10.1300/J106v13n03_06
Lea Worcester, Evelyn Barker



About — Whole Child Education

2015-07-01T07:40:43-00:00




Podcasting for Learning in Universities

2015-03-05T14:04:08-00:00

(01 August 2008)

_Podcasting for Learning in Universities_ details several examples of research to practice for the successful use of podcasts in Higher Education, drawing from studies in the UK, Australia and South Africa. The book offers a practical transferable model and guidelines for integrating podcasts in higher education contexts. There is a dedicated website at www.podcastingforlearning.com with further links and examples. . . **_"The sheer range of ideas for using podcasts shown by the case studies, will hopefully spark off a number of ideas for ways in which practice in one subject can be re-used in another. Case studies covering reflective learning, active learning, students voices, fieldwork, distance learning and learning transferable skills, show that podcasts are flexible enough as a medium to deliver effective learning outcomes regardless of the subject." _** _ESCalate, 2nd October 2008._ To read more of the ESCalate review click here. . . . **_"This book is exactly what is required for a wide range of potential readers - it is practical, yet derived from research; it is focused on student learning, yet has a technical component; it is leading-edge, yet it draws on many case studies."** . Professor Robin Mason, The Open University, UK . . **"I recommend this book to all academics in higher education."** . Peter Bullen, Ford Professor of Automotive Engineering, University of Hertfordshire, UK . . **"This book shows how podcasts can help transform the teaching and learning experience in Higher Education...a blueprint for podcast use."** . Professor David Nicol, University of Strathclyde, Scotland . . **_"The students' views are represented strongly throughout the book, which helps to make it a compelling and extremely worthwhile read."** . Dr Linda Creanor, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland . . **_"Finally, a Podcasting Bible for education!"** . Mazlan Hasan, Senior Instructional Designer, National Institute of Education, Singapore . . **_"The 10-step pedagogic model for developing podcasting provides an essential step-by-step guide for anyone venturing into this area for the first time."** . Richard Wallis, TwoFour Learning . . **_"After reading this book, I am attracted to offering another flexible learning choice. Podcasting affords active learning whether individual, cooperative or collaborative contributions, either formal or informal."** . Denise Nelson, Course Designer, SIAST Virtual Campus, Canada . . **Contributors:** Marialuisa Aliotta, Simon Bates, David Bell, Keith Brunton, Chris Cane, Annette Cashmore, Claire Chambers, Brian Cox, Chris Dennett, Stuart Downward, Palitha Edirisingha, John Fothergill, Derek France, Martin Jenkins, Mark J. W. Lee, David Livingstone, Jo Lonsdale, Kenny Lynch, Raymond Macharia, Matthew Mobbs, Richard Mobbs, Nick Mount, Dick Ng'ambi, Ming Nie, Chris Ribchester, Libby Rothwell, Gilly Salmon, Nick Short, Adam Stevens, John Traxler, Belinda Tynan and Kim Whittlestone._.
Gilly Salmon, Palitha Edirisingha



vogelstimmen.de

2013-02-11T13:36:16-00:00




Whiteboard math movies

2012-09-03T07:54:05-00:00

Teaching Mathematics and its Applications, Vol. 26, No. 1. (01 March 2007), pp. 17-22, doi:10.1093/teamat/hrl012

In this article, we discuss whiteboard math movies (a.k.a. mathcasts) and their applications to mathematics education. A whiteboard math (wbm) movie is a screen recording of writing plus voice and/or text explaining a mathematical concept or solving a problem. The movie is then produced to Flash movie format and distributed via CD or Internet. The wbm movies are the ultimate in asynchronous learning—providing a simple and inexpensive means of interaction at the teacher–student, teacher–teacher, student–teacher and student–student level. With wbm movies both the creator and the viewer get to see and hear the mathematical thinking step-by-step. They get the process and not just the result and they can have it when and as many times as they want. We talk about how Tim Fahlberg came up with this idea over 8 years ago and describe the developments in technology—that are at least partially the result of our team's work—that now make wbm movie making a cost-efficient, effective and even a fun way of truly learning mathematics.
Tim Fahlberg, Linda Fahlberg-Stojanovska, Rev



The sound of feedback in higher education

2012-08-02T14:53:06-00:00

Learning, Media and Technology, Vol. 35, No. 1. (2010), pp. 53-64, doi:10.1080/17439881003671128

Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback pedagogy and feedback practices. Podcasting as a whole is also largely under-researched. This article explores recent research on, and practices used for, PAF. It argues that PAF should be based on the principles of dialogic learning.
Maggi Savin-Baden



Education Research: Evaluating the use of podcasting for residents during EEG instruction

2012-08-02T14:52:09-00:00

Neurology, Vol. 77, No. 8. (23 August 2011), pp. e42-e44, doi:10.1212/wnl.0b013e31822b0017

Objective: Educational methods for residents are shifting toward greater learner independence aided by technological advances. A Web-based program using a podcast was created for resident EEG instruction, replacing conventional didactics. The EEG curriculum also consisted of EEG interpretations under the tutelage of a neurophysiologist. This pilot study aimed to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of the podcast as a new teaching tool.Methods: A podcast for resident EEG instruction was implemented on the Web, replacing the traditional lecture. After Institutional Review Board approval, consent was obtained from the participating residents. Using 25-question evaluation tools, participants were assessed at baseline before any EEG instruction, and reassessed after podcasting and after 10 clinical EEG exposures. Each 25-item evaluation tool contained tracings used for clinical EEG interpretations. Scores after podcast training were also compared to scores after traditional didactic training from a previous study among anesthesiology trainees.Results: Ten anesthesiology residents completed the study. The mean scores with standard deviations are 9.50 ± 2.92 at baseline, 13.40 ± 3.31 (p = 0.034) after the podcast, and 16.20 ± 1.87 (p = 0.019) after interpreting 10 EEGs. No differences were noted between the mean educational tool scores for those who underwent podcasting training compared to those who had undergone traditional didactic training.Conclusion: In this pilot study, podcast training was as effective as the prior conventional lecture in meeting the curricular goals of increasing EEG knowledge after 10 EEG interpretations as measured by assessment tools. Neurology® 2011;77:e42–e44
Meriem Bensalem-Owen, Destiny Chau, Sean Sardam, Brenda Fahy



Use of Web 2.0 tools in academic libraries: A reconnaissance of the international landscape

2012-01-30T05:31:13-00:00

The International Information & Library Review, Vol. 42, No. 3. (September 2010), pp. 195-207, doi:10.1016/j.iilr.2010.07.005

The purpose of this paper is to provide a reconnaissance of major academic libraries located in Australia, Canada, the U.K. and U.S.A. that have embraced Web 2.0 tools for enhancing library services. The research is based on a survey of websites of 277 university libraries. The checkpoints used for this evaluative study were given by Nguyen (2008) for evaluating various Web 2.0 tools. Additional checkpoints were arrived at after visiting and browsing the various sites. The findings of the study acknowledge the strength of Web 2.0 tools in improving library services for users. Really Simple Syndication (RSS), Instant Messaging (IM) and blogs are popular in academic libraries. The paper concludes by offering best practices for implementing Web 2.0 tools in academic libraries.
Manorama Tripathi, Sunil Kumar



Students, Internet, eLearning and Web 2.0

2011-09-20T11:25:17-00:00

In Looking Toward the Future of Technology-Enhanced Education: Ubiquitous Learning and the Digital Native (December 2009), pp. 13-36, doi:10.4018/978-1-61520-678-0

An investigation into the students’ use of internet services, media types and e-learning preferences tried to find out if students today are interested in the use of Web 2.0 methods for learning. More than 2.000 students participated in the survey conducted by the international architecture company DEGW and the author. The data of the survey are compared to the results of a parallel study by HIS GmbH that was answered by 4.400 students. The results of both studies throw a critical light on the popular discussion about the net generation or the so-called digitalnatives and may lend themselves to a more cautious or careful introduction of Web 2.0 methods in teaching and learning accompanied by instructional and tutorial assistance.
Rolf Schulmeister



Kompetenzentwicklung mit Blended Learning und Web 2.0

2011-09-20T11:24:36-00:00

In Innovative Lernsysteme (2008), pp. 123-176, doi:10.1007/978-3-540-77831-8_7

Kompetenzlernen führt Lernen und Arbeiten wieder zusammen. Erst bei der Lösung von Praxisproblemen, in realen Entscheidungssituationen, müssen die Lerner die notwendigen Herausforderungen überwinden, die für die Kompetenzentwicklung notwendig sind. Dieses Lernen unterscheidet sich deutlich vom gewohnten „schulischen“ Lernen auf den Ebenen der Wissensvermittlung und der Qualifikation.
Annette Kuhlmann, Werner Sauter



iTunes statt Hörsaal? Gedanken zur mündlichen Weitergabe von wissenschaftlichem Wissen

2011-09-20T11:23:55-00:00

In E-Learning 2009: Lernen im digitalen Zeitalter (September 2009), pp. 256-268

Die mündliche Weitergabe wissenschaftlichen Wissens ist in Form von Vorlesungen eine der ältesten Lehrformen und erfreut sich in Form von Podcasts wachsender Beliebtheit. Neuerungen wie iTunes U beleben diesen Trend. Dennoch wird weder dem „akademischen Zuhören“ noch dem Vortragen selbst in Theorie und Praxis besondere Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Der Beitrag greift genau diese Aspekte auf und nutzt sie für Gedanken dazu, wie man Produktion und Rezeption von (Audio-) Podcasts jenseits der Vorlesungsaufzeichnung anders angehen könnte.
Gabi Reinmann



Making the Decision to Provide Enhanced Podcasts to Post-Secondary Science Students

2011-07-14T15:24:26-00:00

Journal of Science Education and Technology (17 September 2010), pp. 1-13-13, doi:10.1007/s10956-010-9248-1

Providing students with supplementary course materials such as audio podcasts, enhanced podcasts, video podcasts and other forms of lecture-capture video files after a lecture is now a common occurrence in many post-secondary courses. We used an online questionnaire to ask students how helpful enhanced podcasts were for a variety of course activities and how important having access to the enhanced podcasts was in their decision to miss classes. Student responses from two courses, one introductory and one advanced, were compared. Students in the introductory Genetics course reported that having access to enhanced podcasts was very important in their decision to miss class more often (39%) than those in the advanced Microbiology course (20%). They also reported missing more classes than students in the advanced course. Students in both courses found the enhanced podcasts helpful for a range of learning activities. First year students who missed just a few classes and those who missed many classes both found the enhanced podcasts to be very helpful for learning activities. We argue that creating these resources is a good choice for instructors irrespective of the level of the course they teach and that the potential value of these resources, particularly for first year students, outweighs any impact that having access to supplementary enhanced podcasts of the lectures may have on class attendance.
Jane Holbrook, Christine Dupont



Twelve tips for using podcasts in medical education

2011-06-12T21:14:50-00:00

Med Teach In Medical Teacher, Vol. 31, No. 5. (1 January 2009), pp. 387-389, doi:10.1080/01421590802227958

There is increasing use of podcasts by young people, including medical students. Podcasts offer small packages of educational material that allow selective replay to consolidate learning, especially for exam revision. Podcasts can be provided in a variety of formats and played on a range of devices, both static and mobile. Maximum educational impact requires careful attention to production and editing.
John Sandars



Podcast downloading

2011-06-04T15:03:24-00:00

(2008)

This August 2008 report states that "podcasting has yet to become a fixture in the everyday lives of internet users, as very few internet users download podcasts on a typical day. Even of those who say they download podcasts, just 17% do so on a typical day."
Mary Madden, Sydney Jones, Pew Internet



Use of audio podcast in K-12 and higher education: a review of research topics and methodologies

2011-05-27T11:58:30-00:00

Educational Technology Research and Development, Vol. 57, No. 3. (1 June 2009), pp. 333-357, doi:10.1007/s11423-008-9108-3

This article reviews past empirical studies on the use of audio podcast (hereby referred to as podcast) in K-12 and higher education settings. Using the constant comparative method, this review is organized into three major research areas or topics: (a) participants’ podcast usage profile, (b) effects of podcast on learners’ outcomes, and (b) institutional aspects. Findings suggest that the most common use of podcasting is limited to either instructors distributing podcast recordings of lectures or supplementary materials for students to review subject material at their own time and place. A majority of the previous studies were descriptive, and were conducted in higher education and traditional course settings. Students generally enjoy using podcast, and tend to listen to the podcasts at home using desktop computers, rather than on the move (e.g., commuting to school) with a mobile device. Probably the main benefit of podcasting is that it allows students to listen to specific material that they missed or did not understand multiple times. The availability of podcast does not appear to encourage students to skip classes. We also discuss limitations of previous empirical studies, and provide some directions for future research related to the use of podcast in education settings.
Khe Hew



Audio and video podcasts of lectures for campus-based students: production and evaluation of student use

2011-05-26T13:34:33-00:00

Innovations in Education and Teaching International, Vol. 44, No. 4. (2007), pp. 387-399, doi:10.1080/14703290701602805

Podcasting has become a popular medium for accessing and assimilating information and podcasts are increasingly being used to deliver audio recordings of lectures to campus-based students. This paper describes a simple, cost-effective and file size-efficient method for producing video podcasts combining lecture slides and audio without a requirement for any specialist software. The results from a pilot scheme delivering supplementary lecture materials as audio and video podcasts are also presented, including data on download patterns and responses to a survey of students on podcast use. These results reveal students enthusiasm for podcast recordings of lecture materials and their primary use by students in revision and preparation for assessments. Survey responses also suggest little likely impact on lecture attendance as a consequence of podcasting, but indicate that podcast recordings of lectures may not be effective in facilitating mobile learning.
Jonathan Copley



Podcasting: Exploring the Possibilities for Academic Libraries

2011-05-01T18:11:38-00:00

pp. 87-91

Podcasting is a recent phenomenon on the Internet, which offers academic libraries an alternative channel for communication with faculty and students. This paper describes podcasting, and offers examples of its use in academic and public libraries. The paper concludes with a description of the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries' experiences in creating a podcast and suggestions for libraries considering podcasting. doi:10.1300/J106v13n03_06
Lea Worcester, Evelyn Barker






Podcasting by synchronising PowerPoint and voice: What are the pedagogical benefits?

2011-02-18T21:55:29-00:00

Computers & Education, Vol. 53, No. 2. (2009), pp. 532-539

The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of audio-visual synchrony in podcasting and its possible pedagogical benefits. [`]Synchrony' in this study refers to the simultaneous playback of audio and video data streams, so that the transitions between presentation slides occur at "lecturer chosen" points in the audio commentary. Manufacturers of lecture recording software (e.g. ProfCast) would have us believe that the synchrony of image and audio should improve the learning experience. We have yet to see in the literature any empirical evidence to support this hypothesis. In our study, 90 participants in two groups undertook two electronic lectures (e-lectures) on two separate topics, the subject matter of neither was familiar to them beforehand. Each group experienced one "synchronous" presentation (e-lecture) of one of the topics, and one "separate" presentation (i.e. PowerPoint and audio files separately presented) of the other topic. Each group therefore experienced both "synchronous" and "separate" delivery and they were then given an MCQ test that assessed five levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Results show no differences in innate ability between the two groups but the evidence supported our primary hypothesis in that statistically significantly higher test scores were seen when participants viewed a synchronous e-lecture; these scores were accounted for by subjects' performance at three of the five levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Qualitative [`]attitude' survey results also displayed participant preference towards the synchronous over the asynchronous mode of delivery, and in spite of general acceptance of the proposed benefits of electronic proceedings, a majority preference towards traditional rather than electronic lectures. Despite this conservatism, this paper explores in more detail the potential benefits of podcasting via synchronous PowerPoint and voice.
D Griffin, D Mitchell, S Thompson



iTunes University and the classroom: Can podcasts replace Professors?

2011-02-18T21:55:28-00:00

Computers & Education, Vol. 52, No. 3. (2009), pp. 617-623
D McKinney, J Dyck, E Luber



Use of audio podcast in K-12 and higher education: a review of research topics and methodologies

2010-11-08T22:30:35-00:00

Educational Tech Research Dev (2009), pp. 333-357
Khe Hew



Educator's podcast guide

2010-10-10T23:22:25-00:00

(2007)
Bard Williams, International Society for Technology in Education



Blogs, podcasts, and wikis: the new names in information dissemination.

2010-09-14T15:31:32-00:00

Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 107, No. 4. (April 2007), pp. 553-555, doi:10.1016/j.jada.2007.02.027
Jennifer Mathieu



iTunes statt Hörsaal? Gedanken zur mündlichen Weitergabe von wissenschaftlichem Wissen

2010-09-02T07:33:58-00:00

In E-Learning 2009, Vol. 51 (2009), pp. 247-256
Gabi Reinmann



The Friday Podcast: New York Fed Chief, Bubble Fighter

2010-08-23T10:36:10-00:00

NPR Planet Money (9 April 2010)
William Dudley



Science Podcast

2010-06-26T13:07:11-00:00

Science, Vol. 323, No. 5911. (9 January 2009), 279b, doi:10.1126/science.323.5911.279b

10.1126/science.323.5911.279b



Podcasting in education: Are students as ready and eager as we think they are?

2010-06-08T12:54:03-00:00

Computers & Education, Vol. 54, No. 2. (27 February 2010), pp. 371-378, doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2009.08.018

Instructors in higher education are disseminating instructional content via podcasting, as many rally behind the technology’s potential benefits. Others have expressed concern about the risks of deleterious effects that might accompany the adoption of podcasting, such as lower class attendance. Yet, relatively few studies have investigated students’ perceptions of podcasting for educational purposes, especially in relation to different podcasting forms: repetitive and supplemental. The present study explored students’ readiness and attitudes towards these two forms of podcasting to provide fundamental information for future researchers and educators. The results indicated that students may not be as ready or eager to use podcasting for repetitive or supplemental educational purposes as much as we think they are, but they could be persuaded.
Stephen Walls, John Kucsera, Joshua Walker, Taylor Acee, Nate McVaugh, Daniel Robinson



Psychosocial predictors of the use of enhanced podcasting in student learning

2010-05-10T13:56:19-00:00

Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 26, No. 3. (May 2010), pp. 302-309, doi:10.1016/j.chb.2009.10.012
Nathan Moss, Erin O'Connor, Katherine White



From music to macromolecules: using rich media/podcast lecture recordings to enhance the preclinical educational experience.

2010-04-19T22:05:19-00:00

Medical teacher, Vol. 30, No. 6. (1 January 2008), pp. 630-632, doi:10.1080/01421590802144302

Little is known regarding the impact of lecture recordings on medical education. This study was designed to assess the impact of lecture recordings on the educational experience of first-year medical students. Students were provided with digital lecture recordings in Molecular Foundations of Medicine, an integrated preclinical science block. Students could access recordings as audio/visual rich media, in which lectures were linked to slide presentations, and as audio-only podcasts. Student reactions were assessed by a mandatory questionnaire on the use of recordings and by a voluntary follow-up questionnaire on the effects of recordings on learning, stress and anxiety. Student response to lecture recordings was universally positive. A high proportion of the class accessed recordings, with rich media being the preferred format. Students felt that the lecture recordings helped them learn course material and reduced stress and anxiety. Finally, the availability of lecture recordings had no apparent adverse effect on classroom attendance. The availability of lecture recordings aided medical students in their studies and reduced stress and anxiety. Student response to the recordings was universally positive, and no negative outcomes were noted by students or faculty.
Piotr Pilarski, D Alan Johnstone, Cathleen Pettepher, Neil Osheroff



Do biodiversity patterns in Dutch wetland complexes relate to variation in urbanisation, intensity of agricultural land use or fragmentation?

2010-04-19T22:04:04-00:00

Biodiversity and Conservation, Vol. 16, No. 12. (27 October 2006), pp. 3585-3595, doi:10.1007/s11423-009-9128-7

Abstract  The present study investigated the impact of class lecture webcasts on students’ attendance and learning. The research design employed four data collection methods in two class sections—one with webcast access and another without—of the same course taught by the same instructors. Results indicated the following four major findings. (1) The availability of webcasts negatively impacted student attendance but the availability of other online resources such as PowerPoint slides had a greater negative impact on attendance. (2) Webcast access appeared to nullify the negative effects absenteeism had on student performance. (3) For most performance measures based on lecture content, more webcast viewing was associated with higher performance. (4) Most students in the webcast section reported positive learning experiences and benefits from using webcasts, even though a majority also reported using webcasts for missing a class. In summary, these results collectively suggest that webcasts could have positive effects on students’ learning experiences and performance, even if class attendance does decline.
Jan Vermaat, Hasse Goosen, Nancy Omtzigt



LibriVox

2010-01-11T18:01:54-00:00










Web 2.0 im Kundenmanagement

2009-12-13T11:21:47-00:00

HMD - Praxis der Wirtschaftsinformatik, Vol. 252 (December 2006), pp. 55-65

Durch Web 2.0-Technologien können Geschäftsprozesse in Marketing und Vertrieb unterstützt werden, wie es in der realen Welt nicht möglich ist. Vor allem im »People Business« und Dienstleistungsgeschäft entscheiden die Kundenbeziehungen über einen dauerhaften Geschäftserfolg. Für ein Technologieunternehmen wie die T-Systems Multimedia Solutions GmbH in Dresden bedeutet das fundamentale Herausforderungen an die Entwicklung dieser Beziehungen zu ihren Geschäftskunden. Neue Herausforderungen durch aktives Einbeziehen der Kunden eröffnen die Chance, den Kunden enger an den wertschöpfenden Prozessen und Produktentwicklungen teilhaben zu lassen. Corporate Weblogs liefern eine Infrastruktur, Beziehungen sowohl zu Bestandskunden zu vertiefen als auch zu Besuchern einer Website aufzubauen. Im Rahmen der Planung neuer Marketing- und Vertriebsstrategien wurden daher umfassende Recherchen angestellt, vieles ausprobiert und prototypisch entwickelt und einiges davon bereits erfolgreich eingeführt. Einige dieser Erfahrungen wurden generalisiert und sollen im Folgenden kurz beleuchtet werden.
Martina Göhring, Simone Happ, Thomas Müller



Praxisbuch Web 2.0

2009-12-13T11:21:47-00:00

(2007)

Leserrezension: Wer Themen nur überfliegen möchte, um ein grobes Verständnis über ein bestimmtes Thema zu erlangen, dem sei dieses Buch empfohlen. Wer danach vertiefende Informationen, Tipps, Tricks und Praxisbeispiele sucht, dem sei dieses Buch empfohlen. Wer schlie\\sslich weiterführende Literaturempfehlungen, Links und Screenshots von Vorzeige-Plattformen benötigt, um sich in ein bestimmtes Thema so richtig reinzuhängen, und keine Zeit hat, selbst danach im Internet zu recherchieren, dem sei dieses Buch ebenfalls empfohlen. Ich halte das "Praxisbuch Web 2.0" für eine der besten Erscheinungen in diesem Jahr, denn immer mehr Webentwickler, die ernstzunehmende Angebote im Internet präsentieren möchten, kommen um Webstandards und die neuen Technologien nicht mehr herum. Wer Schritt halten möchte und ein kompetentes und vor allem aktuelles Nachschlagewerk für sich sucht, wird den Kauf des "Praxisbuch Web 2.0" nicht bereuen.
Vitaly Friedman



Web 2.0 – Wikis, Blogs und Podcasts

2009-12-13T11:21:47-00:00


Claudia Lanzl



Web 2.0 – das "neue" Internet macht Schule!

2009-12-13T11:21:46-00:00

(December 2006)

Mit Web 2.0 soll die aktive Ära des Internets beginnen und selbst in den Feuilletons der Wochenzeitungen ist von der "Neuerfindung des Internets" die Rede. Begriffe wie Blog, Wiki und Online-Community stehen für den Übergang vom Distributionsmedium Internet in ein "Mitmach- Netz", das die aktive und vor allem die gemeinsame Gestaltung des Internets zum Prinzip erhebt. Welche Konsequenzen und Chancen ergeben sich für den Bildungsbereich, wenn die Medienlandschaft vor dem grö\\ssten Umbruch seit Gutenberg steht? Ist die geschlossene Anstalt Schule mit ihren tradierten IT-Strukturen bereit für den Einstieg in das neue Medienzeitalter des ubiquitous computing? Der Artikel versucht diese Fragen zu beantworten und gleichzeitig einen praxisorientierten und nachvollziehbaren Überblick für alle Internetnutzer zu geben, die bislang nur wenig mit dem Schlagwort Web 2.0 anzufangen wussten.
Volker Rüddigkeit



Exploration innovativer virtueller Lernräume im Internet und die sich daraus ergebenden Impulse für die Ausbildung von Sozialpädagoginnen und Sozialpädagogen

2009-12-13T11:21:46-00:00



Im Internet ist ein Wandlungsprozess zu beobachten und es entstehen hier innovative Plattformen, auf denen sich neue Formen der Kommunikation und Partizipation herausbilden. Eine gro\\sse Zahl von Nutzern begnügt sich nicht länger damit, nur passiver Empfänger von Informationen zu sein, sondern versendet auch Informationen im Internet. Bereits Bertolt Brecht (1977) formulierte 1932 in seiner ‟ Rede über die Funktion des Rundfunks ” die Forderung, das Radio von einem Distributionsapparat in einen Kommunikationsapparat zu verwandeln. Diese Utopie, in deren Kern es um die Entwicklung einer neuen medialen Öffentlichkeit geht, scheint sich partiell im Internet zu verwirklichen. Daher geht es im ersten Abschnitt, der vorliegenden Arbeit, um die Deutung und Bewertung dieser neuen Bewegung und um das sich daraus ableitbare Potential für die Sozialpädagogik. Es ist darüber hinaus zu vermuten, dass sich durch die Nutzung des Internets auch neue Denk- und Wahrnehmungsweisen herausbilden, die unmittelbare Folgen auf das Individuum und das gesellschaftliche Zusammenleben haben werden. Diese Veränderungen beeinflussen die Kommunikation, die soziale Begegnung und die Fragen nach der eigenen Identität.
Raphael Kurz



Web 2.0: Neue erfolgreiche Kommunikationsstrategien für kleine und mittlere Unternehmen

2009-12-13T11:21:46-00:00

In Band 57: Web 2.0: Neue erfolgreiche Kommunikationsstrategien für kleine und mittlere Unternehmen (2007)

Das World Wide Web ist im Wandel. Unter dem recht unscheinbaren Begriff Web 2.0 verbirgt sich, dass die Nutzer im Netz zunehmend die Inhalte selber erstellen. Das Einstellen von Videos, Berichten über das eigene Leben oder die Zufriedenheit mit Produkten oder Kommentaren zu Tagesereignissen verändern die Beschaffenheit des Internet. Für Unternehmen stellen diese neuen Entwicklungen Chance und Herausforderung dar. Dabei begrenzen sich die Nutzungsmöglichkeiten nicht auf die Interaktion mit Au\\ssenstehenden, sondern sie bieten auch Chancen, die unternehmensinterne Zusammenarbeit entscheidend zu verbessern. Neben der Chance einer stärkeren Kundenbindung verbergen sich aber auch Risiken, wenn z.B. die gewünschte Interaktivität sich verselbständigt und nicht rechtzeitig Grenzen gesetzt wurden. Dieser Wegweiser soll insbesondere kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen helfen, die zentralen Anwendungen des Web 2.0 einzuordnen und sich für diejenigen zu entscheiden, die für sie individuell die grö\\ssten Chancen bei tragbarem Risiko beinhalten.
Paul Alpar, Steffen Blaschke, Steffen Kessler



Ping, Tags und Social Software - Communitybildung und Medienconvergenz durch neue Publikationsformen im Internet

2009-12-13T11:21:46-00:00



Das Internet entwächst langsam seinen Kinderschuhen. War das erste Jahrzehnt seines Wachstums noch dadurch geprägt, dass versucht wurde, herkömmliche Medienformen ins Netz zu übertragen - es gab Magazine, Internet-Radio, bebilderte Prospekte etc. - wird es nun Zeit für etwas Neues. Motor dieser Neuerung sind zu einem gro\\ssen Teil die Weblogs und die Bewegungen, die sich um diese eigenständige Genre, das das "Internet als Medium" hervorgebracht hat, scharen. Die "Blogosphäre" - oder zumindest Teile davon - versuchen unablässig, aus ihren Webseiten herauszuholen, was technisch machbar ist und neue Grenzen der Kommunikation zu erkunden. Lange Zeit von den herkömmlichen Medien eher ignoriert oder belächelt, wird das Phänomen nun im Rahmen des Hypes um ein angebliches "Web 2.0" auf einmal wahrgenommen. Dieser Essay versucht aufzuzeigen, was die neuen Publikationsformen im Internet sind, was sie können und welche zukünftigen Möglichkeiten in ihnen stecken. Dabei werden die "Bausteine" betrachtet, aus denen die Social Software gezimmert ist und anschlie\\ssend versucht, eine abschlie\\ssende, vorsichtige Bewertung zu geben.
Jörg Kantel



Ping, Tags und Social Software - Communitybildung und Medienconvergenz durch neue Publikationsformen im Internet

2009-12-13T11:21:45-00:00



Das Internet entwächst langsam seinen Kinderschuhen. War das erste Jahrzehnt seines Wachstums noch dadurch geprägt, dass versucht wurde, herkömmliche Medienformen ins Netz zu übertragen - es gab Magazine, Internet-Radio, bebilderte Prospekte etc. - wird es nun Zeit für etwas Neues. Motor dieser Neuerung sind zu einem gro\\ssen Teil die Weblogs und die Bewegungen, die sich um diese eigenständige Genre, das das "Internet als Medium" hervorgebracht hat, scharen. Die "Blogosphäre" - oder zumindest Teile davon - versuchen unablässig, aus ihren Webseiten herauszuholen, was technisch machbar ist und neue Grenzen der Kommunikation zu erkunden. Lange Zeit von den herkömmlichen Medien eher ignoriert oder belächelt, wird das Phänomen nun im Rahmen des Hypes um ein angebliches "Web 2.0" auf einmal wahrgenommen. Dieser Essay versucht aufzuzeigen, was die neuen Publikationsformen im Internet sind, was sie können und welche zukünftigen Möglichkeiten in ihnen stecken. Dabei werden die "Bausteine" betrachtet, aus denen die Social Software gezimmert ist und anschlie\\ssend versucht, eine abschlie\\ssende, vorsichtige Bewertung zu geben.
Jörg Kantel



Web 2.0 aus Nutzer- und Bibliothekssicht

2009-12-13T11:21:45-00:00

(April 2007)

Das Buzzwort Bibliothek 2.0 muss relativiert werden. Es scheinen hier die Möglichkeiten verstärkter demokratischer Partizipation hervorzustechen. Aber gegenüber den in langen Prozessen entstandenen Institutionen wie die der Bibliothek, können lediglich nutzerorientierte Dienste von Web 2.0 gewinnbringend in das virtuelle Dienstleistungsangebot von Bibliotheken aufgenommen werden. Die Verantwortung der Bibliotheken als kulturstiftende Institutionen verpflichtet dazu, bestimmte Kerntätigkeiten nicht in den Diskussionsraum der Web 2.0-Community zu stellen. Dennoch können Nutzer und Bibliotheken von Web 2.0-Anwendungen profitieren. Dazu werden Mash-up-Dienste, Foren, Bewertungssysteme und andere Tools vorgestellt und deren Potential erwogen. Schlie\\sslich darf man bei aller Innovation die Nutzerorientierung unabhängig vom Medium (virtuell/physisch) und die grundlegenden Probleme von Bibliotheken (Einsparungen/chronische Ressourcenknappheit) nicht vernachlässigen.
Ingo Caesar



Weblogs als mediale Gegenöffentlichkeit

2009-12-13T11:21:45-00:00

(June 2006)

Wie ist die Faszination des Mediums zu erklären? Für wen öffnen sich damit ökonomische Chancen? Sind Weblogs ein demokratieförderndes Instrument? Wie beeinflussen Blogs den interkulturellen Dialog?
Max Rebol






e-Learning Blog

2009-12-13T11:21:45-00:00



Dieser Blog soll dazu dienen, die e-Learning Aktivitäten der TU Graz darzustellen. Besonderer Schwerpunkt liegt dabei auf Neuentwicklungen und Einsatzszenarien in der Hochschullehre.Weiters sollen auch Neuigkeiten, interessante Dinge aus dem Bereich des e-Learnings dargestellt werden.
Martin Ebner



Web 2.0 im Kundenmanagement

2009-12-06T14:45:16-00:00

HMD - Praxis der Wirtschaftsinformatik, Vol. 252 (December 2006), pp. 55-65

Durch Web 2.0-Technologien können Geschäftsprozesse in Marketing und Vertrieb unterstützt werden, wie es in der realen Welt nicht möglich ist. Vor allem im »People Business« und Dienstleistungsgeschäft entscheiden die Kundenbeziehungen über einen dauerhaften Geschäftserfolg. Für ein Technologieunternehmen wie die T-Systems Multimedia Solutions GmbH in Dresden bedeutet das fundamentale Herausforderungen an die Entwicklung dieser Beziehungen zu ihren Geschäftskunden. Neue Herausforderungen durch aktives Einbeziehen der Kunden eröffnen die Chance, den Kunden enger an den wertschöpfenden Prozessen und Produktentwicklungen teilhaben zu lassen. Corporate Weblogs liefern eine Infrastruktur, Beziehungen sowohl zu Bestandskunden zu vertiefen als auch zu Besuchern einer Website aufzubauen. Im Rahmen der Planung neuer Marketing- und Vertriebsstrategien wurden daher umfassende Recherchen angestellt, vieles ausprobiert und prototypisch entwickelt und einiges davon bereits erfolgreich eingeführt. Einige dieser Erfahrungen wurden generalisiert und sollen im Folgenden kurz beleuchtet werden.
Martina Göhring, Simone Happ, Thomas Müller



Praxisbuch Web 2.0

2009-12-06T14:45:16-00:00

(2007)

Leserrezension: Wer Themen nur überfliegen möchte, um ein grobes Verständnis über ein bestimmtes Thema zu erlangen, dem sei dieses Buch empfohlen. Wer danach vertiefende Informationen, Tipps, Tricks und Praxisbeispiele sucht, dem sei dieses Buch empfohlen. Wer schlie\\sslich weiterführende Literaturempfehlungen, Links und Screenshots von Vorzeige-Plattformen benötigt, um sich in ein bestimmtes Thema so richtig reinzuhängen, und keine Zeit hat, selbst danach im Internet zu recherchieren, dem sei dieses Buch ebenfalls empfohlen. Ich halte das "Praxisbuch Web 2.0" für eine der besten Erscheinungen in diesem Jahr, denn immer mehr Webentwickler, die ernstzunehmende Angebote im Internet präsentieren möchten, kommen um Webstandards und die neuen Technologien nicht mehr herum. Wer Schritt halten möchte und ein kompetentes und vor allem aktuelles Nachschlagewerk für sich sucht, wird den Kauf des "Praxisbuch Web 2.0" nicht bereuen.
Vitaly Friedman



Web 2.0 – Wikis, Blogs und Podcasts

2009-12-06T14:45:16-00:00


Claudia Lanzl