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Last Build Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 12:24:12 PST

 



Breaking: Trump names Army Lt. Gen. HR McMaster as national security adviser, after Flynn ousted in Russia scandal

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 12:12:38 PST

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Embattled President Donald Trump has chosen Army Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster as national security adviser, replacing the disgraced and resigned Michael Flynn, whose name is stained with the still murky Russia scandal.

America's status, folks? It's complicated.

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James Baldwin trounces William F. Buckley (1965)

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 10:29:16 PST

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This debate is always worth watching again.

Revered poet, playwrite and social activist James Baldwin debated a young William F. Buckley at The Cambridge Union in 1965, the question was "Is the American dream at the expense of the American negro?"

The students voted 540-160 in favor of Baldwin's thesis. Buckley demonstrates early moves to couch racism and bigotry as States Rights issues.

Here is a transcript of Baldwin's speech.




Some more flavors of Noodler's Ink

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 10:02:44 PST

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I prefer Noodler's ink, and they have so many varieties I never seem to run out of new ones to try. Depending on what I'm writing, or who I am writing to, I like to change my ink and pen kinda frequently.

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Perfectly on-point comics document the horrors and awkwardnesses of life

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:40:32 PST

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When you meet someone new, do you know what to say but still say the wrong thing? How much do you overanalyze everything that’s happening in your relationships? What do your brain, your heart, and your uterus think when their expectations of you are too high? Adulthood is a Myth explores these questions and more in over 100 comic strips.

Writer and artist Sarah Anderson compiled the best of her work from the online “Sarah’s Scribbles” collection and created plenty more comic strips to explain the insecurities and set back introverts face as they come into adulthood. These crisp black-and-white comic strips cover stressful situations like trying on clothes, being in crowds of people, obsessing over your flaws, and making the inevitable but always ill-advised comparisons to people who have figured out more than you have. Other comic strips show the unnamed main character having fun with her body fat, embracing her imperfections, and finding pleasure in little things like lying on warm laundry, wearing men’s hoodies, and embracing holiday costumes.

If the title doesn’t make you want to pick it up, the fuzzy sweater on the cover might convince you. Read it all in one sitting or start wherever you’d like as you linger over the expressive drawings, wonder about the talking rabbit, and generally relax with the knowledge that the things that made you think you were weird and alone are universal among introverts.

– Megan Hippler

Adulthood is a Myth: A Sarah's Scribbles Collection
by Sarah Andersen
Andrews McMeel Publishing
2016, 112 pages, 6.5 x 0.3 x 8.0 inches, Paperback
$12 Buy on Amazon

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.




Visible crocodile model

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:20:49 PST

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This 15" long crocodile model has 26 detachable organ and body parts, and see-through skin to let you inspect its innards. It's on sale for $20 on Amazon.




"I'll never trust another trapezoid"

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:00:30 PST

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The guy in the cap doesn't get it, but the smart bald guy in glasses knows how it works. From the Bell Science Series film, "Gateways to the Mind" (1958).

Watch the full film (complete with nostalgically warbly soundtrack): https://youtu.be/-cAdxvl1jys




Every "Best Visual Effects" winner (1927-2016 Oscars)

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:00:05 PST

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Fun to see how visual effects have evolved over the years.




Only 9,000 people attended Trump rally on Saturday

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 08:40:51 PST

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"Artisanal" Nintendo console cartridge hacker creates impossible alternate history games

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 19:15:24 PST

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Josh Jacobson is a Nintendo cartridge hacker who makes homebrew cartridges for games that were never released for NES/SNES, complete with label art and colored plastic cases that makes them look like they came from an alternate universe where (for example), there was a Nintendo version of Sonic the Hedgehog. (more…)




Former Uber engineer alleges sexist abuse in workplace, CEO Travis Kalanick responds

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:39:06 PST

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Updated with response from Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, below.

Susan Fowler Rigetti, a former engineer at Uber, describes in a blog post her experience in a workplace where sexual harassment takes place with impunity, and people who are abused at work are further abused by the organization for which they work.

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Recomendo newsletter: Free books, the Exploratorium, and more

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:28:57 PST

Get the Recomendo weekly newsletter (written by Kevin Kelly, Claudia Dawson, and me) a week early by email. Enjoyment: If the Found Footage Festival tour ever comes your way, I highly recommend you check it out. The two guys who host the events scour thrift stores and yard sales for the most obscure and awkward infomercials, public access shows, training tapes and home videos to showcase. I’ve been to four of their shows and I always laugh so hard it hurts. They currently have 8 volumes available on DVD. You can watch videos of some of their findings on the website. — CD Culture: The US is basically the only country in the world not using metric. It’s not that hard to learn a rough sense of how many kilometers in a mile, or pounds in a kilo. But it is very hard to convert temperatures between Centigrade and Fahrenheit. The solution is to convert all your thermometers to Centigrade: on your phone, in or outside of your house, on websites. Have any digital device display only Celsius, so you can’t cheat. In about a year, you’ll have a reliable and native sense of what’s cool and warm in degrees C. This is supremely handy if you travel anywhere outside of the US. — KK Readable: I feel like an idiot for not discovering OverDrive sooner. It’s a free mobile app that lets you check out ebooks, audiobooks, and videos from your local public library. To use it, you need a a library card from your town or county. I got an Los Angeles Library e-card by signing up online and a couple of minutes later I was reading A Burglar’s Guide to the City. — MF Destination: Since I live in the San Francisco metro area, I get a lot of out-of-town visitors. My favorite place to take them is the Exploratorium along the bayside waterfront. It is the original hands-on science museum, and still the world’s best hands-on learning experience. Many of the interactive exhibits now common at science museums around the world began here; the Exploratorium has all of them and many more found nowhere else. This sprawling temple of innovation and maker-goodness can easily occupy me — even after my 50th visit — for four hours or more. (I normally get saturated after only one hour in other museums.) Of course while it is perfect for kids of all ages, every Thursday evening it’s reserved for adults, and crowded with innovators and artists of all types. — KK Wearable: I spent the last year buying and returning boots in search of a pair that come close to Lucky Brand Basel boots in comfort and style. I’ve gone through two pairs of them in black in the last 5 years and I finally gave up searching and bought an additional pair in brown. I love these because they’re stylish enough to solicit compliments, and they’re so comfortable that I can literally walk miles in them every day. — CD Travel: Would you like to improve your chance of having an empty middle seat when you fly on Southwest? Here’s a trick I’ve started to use that works. When I board, I look for a 3-seat row of chairs where a very large person is sitting in the window or aisle set. I will sit in that row, either in the aisle seat or window seat. As the plane starts to get full, passengers will be reluctant to sit in the middle seat because the big person is encroaching on the space. One time when I did this, the guy sitting in the seat (he was probably 6’5” and weighed 300 pounds) leaned over and said conspiratorially, “No one will sit here. It’s always the last seat they take.“ — MF[...]



Sci-Fi Sundays: Amazing Science Fiction, April 1958

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 05:07:37 PST

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This week I got a chance to un-pack this collection. I've had it for about 10 years now and it has been in boxes the whole time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peVuqpuI36g

I absolutely love this cover. It is unabashedly silly. What is that boy even doing with that dog? Why lug that iron lung so far from your home-dome if the dog can't even walk around? That thing has to weigh a ton. All joking aside, there's something delightful about all the space covers from before 1961, when Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space. Interestingly though, the first dog in space was Laika, in 1951, so I guess they really have no excuse! (more…)




Diner "overwhelmed with customers" after Michelin star awarded by mistake

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 04:49:53 PST

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Le Bouche à Oreille is a perfectly decent working class diner in Bourges that'll feed you a slap-up meal for €10. La Bouche à Oreille, though, is a brilliant €48-course restaurant in Paris. Only one of them should have been awarded a Michelin star, but don't tell that to the posh sorts descending en masse upon an overwhelmed greasy spoon.

The Michelin Guide apologised, saying it had confused the café with a more refined establishment of the same name near Paris. The listing was changed on its website, but not until two days later.

Véronique Jacquet, who runs the café, said it had a regular clientèle of local tradesmen. “Suddenly, we were rushed off our feet. Reporters were coming in and then my son phoned me from Paris, where he lives. He almost died laughing.”

Three cheers for the diner's chef, Penelope Salmon: “I put my heart into my cooking.”