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Indie Game Developer's Podcast



Indie Game Development Podcast



Updated: 2009-04-29T05:36:03.783-07:00

 



Video Interview: Student Developers of Morose Marauders

2009-04-29T05:36:03.822-07:00

Two students at GDC talk about how to develop a game outside of class...while still in school...Show Notes: Interviewer: I'm here at the Game Developers Conference and with me today are some special guests. How about you introduce yourselves?Apollo: My name is Apollo Keno[?].Craig: I'm Craig Cashin [?].Interviewer: You guys developed a game while in school, like student developers.Craig: It is a side project as opposed to our other school projects.Interviewer: Well, walk me through this side project.Craig: Basically, it's just a pretty simple third person run around and shoot stuff.Interviewer: So, your goal was to do like a 3D shooter.Craig: Yeah, with some magic.Apollo: We were pretty tired with first person games, so we just made it third person. Basically, just run around.Interviewer: And the graphics - How did you guys - They look pretty nice. How did you guys do it?Craig: We kind of faked associating just using the art style Photoshop. The characters and the enemies have an outlining, kind of a cartoon outline to them. It's not real associating but it simulates it without giving the engine performance hits.Interviewer: OK.Craig: There's too many of them.Interviewer: How many levels are there right now in the game?Apollo: Right now, it's just this one demo level. You probably if we wanted to go back and add more levels, that wouldn't be so bad now that we have every single game mechanic working. Interviewer: Yeah. What are the core game mechanics then?Apollo: Basically, the game actually started with the camera itself and the way the player moves. That was the base, the spine I guess, that everything had to be done, but the whole look where you're pointing, where the cursor's at, wasn't really built into the engine. Since we decided to take basically a first person engine, we made it a third person. Once that was done, stuff just started laying down as we needed it.Interviewer: Can you talk about then the development of what you actually had to do to make this game and some of the challenges because you guys did this outside of class, right?Apollo: Yeah. Craig: Yeah, well, oh Jesus, there's so much to it. Where to begin?Interviewer: Sure.Craig: First of all, the camera angle was a big issue because it was hard to see the enemies at some point, so we had to play with the camera over and over to get the feel right. We spent weeks modifying the engine to get the character to look wherever the mouse was. Interviewer: Oh, go ahead.Apollo: No, I was just going to say basically it started with an idea and eventually it just steam rolled. We just started doing stuff and we got together.Interviewer: How long did it take to get a prototype up?Apollo I'd say it probably took us from the initial camera and starting to drop assets in, I think it only took about a month and a half and then we had basically the game. At that point things started changing real fast.Interviewer: A lot of student developers talk about making a game. How did you keep the motivation for the first month or month and a half before you didn't have anything going?Craig: We'd keep motivating each other back and forth. We worked outside of class with each other on this. We called each other up like, hey can you get this done? Yeah, maybe, I'll try it.Apollo: Some days you'd just run into a problem or something like that and you've got school work to do. A couple days off and all of a sudden something clicks and you find a fix for something and then you're kind of like, you get the sparks back into and let's get this done now. Interviewer: How did you balance school with this project because this project wasn't for any class credit, right? It was a side project.Apollo: Just separate basically. It was a slow process at the start, and at the end we ended up meeting and we stayed up late nights and stuff like that, any time we weren't working or in school.Craig: At the end of the process our lives pretty much consisted of school and then working on that and catching five hours of sleep, back to school.Interviewer: Can you talk about how you actually learned this[...]



Video + Podcast Interview: Experimental Game, Shadow Physics

2009-04-28T15:25:52.163-07:00

Scott talks about the experimental game Shadow Physics. Check out the video interview + demo and then the audio interview with more details...You can download the additional audio interview here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/shadow-physics-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes: Video: Interviewer: I'm at the Indie Developers Conference and with me today is a special guest. How about you introduce yourself?Scott: Yeah, I'm Scott Anderson. I'm working on a game called Shadow Physics where you play a 2D platform similar to Mario and the shadow is projected by a 3D world. So, here's a guy who is seen walking around in the shadow not on the actual objects, and he is projected on the wall. He can walk alongside the wall and back in the wall. Interviewer: Cool.Scott: A bunch of interesting game play mechanics came out of that basic idea, like if you push the object the 3D object itself falls. You just have to solve this puzzle here. Interviewer: Aw nice, it's tight, dude.Scott: Then, we have some other mechanics. The interesting thing about being in a world created by shadows is that if you move the light that the shadows are being cast from, you are changing the entire world underneath the guy. So, we have puzzles where you can manipulate the world to get the guy to a different place. Interviewer: Sure. How do you go about manipulating the objects? Is that hard to do considering that you're also controlling the character?Scott: Yeah, it's a little hard to do. So right now, it's basically left play.. It's really hard to play on a track [?]. It's left play and then drag to move the light around and the character controls a very simple platform and controls these arrow keys and space jumps.We're still working on the control stuff, especially the camera stuff. It just seems a little awkward. Right now, it's just a free camera. We're looking at other alternative camera means so we can stay kind of hands off.Interviewer: Sure. How close are you then to completion? Scott: I'd say, at least, a year or two off. Interviewer: Wow. OK. Scott: The game is still very early. We're still exploring a lot of the mechanics.Interviewer: Sure.Scott: Here's another example of things that come out of the system. There's multiple lights. So, there's a light here and a light here.Interviewer: Sure.Scott: And that projects two shadows. You can kind of from a single set of objects kind of jump over here on the platform over here.Interviewer: OK. Any other game play mechanics that are interesting, emerging properties that came out of this rule set?Scott: Yeah, Here's one more where we had enemies that war just existing shadow objects like you, and you get hit by the guy. You can actually crush these guys, too, just like you get crushed yourself by shadows.I don't have a good example of that right now, unfortunately, but hopefully we'll have that soon. Here's another light manipulation puzzle where he creates stairs by moving away.Interviewer: Oh, tight. Scott: And there's other mechanics that we still haven't explored yet.Interviewer: Sure.Scott: One example is to use bright light to white out shadows so you can fall through things or fall slower. Another example is to use different colored lights, and the different colored lights would have different physical properties. Interviewer: OK.Scott: So, maybe, gravity is reversed or maybe in one light, for example, blue light, you can swim in the blue light without falling into this. That's pretty much the game.Interviewer: Cool. Audio: Interviewer: I'm here at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco and with me today is a special guest. How about you introduce yourself?Scott: I'm Scott Anderson and I'm working on a game called Shadow Physics with Steve Swink.Interviewer: And you had a game in the Experimental Game Design?Scott: Yeah, Shadow Physics is in the Experimental Game Play Workshop. It's a game about playing a 2D platformer in the shadows created by a 3D World. Interviewer: How did you come up with the idea? What was the process? Scott: Steve ac[...]



Podcast Interview: Arthur from Last Day of Work

2009-04-23T06:36:06.550-07:00

Arthur, from Last Day of Work Games, talks about their current games, integrating stories into games, and how indies can succeed...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/last-day-of-work-games-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes:Interviewer: I'm at the Game Developers Conference and with me today is a special guest. How about you introduce yourself?Arthur: Hi, I'm Arthur Humphrey. I'm the founder and lead designer and lead engineer at Last Day of Work.Interviewer: And you focus on specific types of games. Can you talk about the genre that you do?Arthur: Yeah, we specialize in virtual life sense and virtual pets, and we disguise them as adventure games and tycoon games and a variety of other genres. So, we really aren't a hybrid but at heart the games are virtual pets that run in Real Time like a Tomagatchi. Interviewer: I interviewed you a few years ago. What have you been up to recently in terms of games that you are releasing and platforms that you are on?Arthur: Well, we're still here.Interviewer: That's awesome to hear.Arthur: It's a great start. We are expanding some of the franchises that we talked about back when we talked before. The leading franchise is always Virtual Villagers, and we've done three chapters of that now and brought two of them over to iPhone, one through a license and one we've done in-house. And, they've both done really well. We brought Fish Tank over to iPhone, and now we're trying to create something new again. We're creating what I describe as the game I always wanted to make, and it's a virtual life simulator that, at first glance, probably resembles the Sims. It's a family in a house, but mechanically from a gamer design perspective it's much more emergent. It's much more of a simulation. It's very sandboxy, and we're really excited about it.It's got some really crazy features that hopefully will create some emergent narratives that really represent the drama that life gives you, you know, the ups and downs and the big themes, like a family, career, happiness, health, death.Interviewer: You know, since the last time we spoke, have you, I guess, come into any other realizations about how to effectively communicate simulations to your audience, or some of the... I know you have this underlying algorithm that you have to constantly test as you're balancing your game. I don't know if you tweak that or come to any other new realizations or understandings related to that. Arthur: There are a lot of levers that we've discovered in the design of this type of game, and one of them relating to what you are mentioning is how much do you want the game to be emergent, how much do you want to let the algorithms tell the story and how much do you also want to put in a handcrafted, let's call it pre-rendered, story.Interviewer: Sure.Arthur: And we've done both and we tried to mix these. Basically, if you put the lever all the way to the handcrafted story you get a rich wonderful story that engages the players and you get zero replayability.Interviewer: Sure.Arthur: And if you put the lever the other way you get maximum replayability, but the story becomes a little bit generic as the player can quickly break it down into these thesis that the algorithm is putting together for the narrative.Interviewer: Sure.Arthur: So, we try to kind of do both. In Virtual Villagers we did that by having a meta story but leaving the game sandboxy so that the way they unlock these chapters of the story as they play are completely order independent and a lot of emergent stories can still come out of the game like members of your tribe that are very quirky, that will do this and that and they start to bond friendships. People come up. They fill in the blanks with these stories that happen in the game. In fact, people do this and focus so much on the families in their tribes that we realized we needed to make a game that was just about these family units. That's what led us to the idea of making a family simulator. Interviewer: [...]



Podcast Interview: Adam from flashgamelicense.com

2009-04-21T04:46:29.222-07:00

Adam, from flashgamelicense.com, talks about a good way for indies to make money off their games...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/flash-game-license-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes: Interviewer: I'm here at the Game Developers Conference and with me today is a special guest. How about you introduce yourself?Adam: Hi, this is Adam Schroeder from flashgamelicense.com.Interviewer: What's your site about?Adam: Basically, we're a marketplace for flash developers. You can upload your game to our site. We put you in front of hundreds of different buyers. They bid on the game, and we get you the most money possible for it. Interviewer: So, if an indie wants to actually... Why would an indie use this site aside from, I guess, getting more money? Are there other benefits to reach this site?Adam: Yeah, in the whole community there's about 4,000 developers now. We have really active forums. You can get feedback on your game or coding help. We have a sister site, FlashGameArtWork, where you can look to find artistic talent for your games.We have a first impression service where you can quickly order reviews of your game and get sort of iterative feedback within a very short time period, make changes to the game, run it again, make sure people are understanding the directions and the game play, and sort of getting into it really early.Interviewer: How much is the sponsorship range in terms of prices that games can get on the site?Adam: The prices range all over the place. A really high end flash game can make 5, 10, 15, 20, even more money. What we try to do for the really high end content is structure a deal where the amount that an offer receives is directly proportional to the value that the sponsor gets on the game. Usually, that's under some sort of CPC model where you get, say, 5,000 upfront and then five cents per click for a certain period of time. Under that model, a really popular game can really generate a lot of revenue.You can also put in-game ads within the game which can generate lots of money. There's lots of different ways of licensing the games. What we really push people towards is what we call primary license where the person is sort of buying the rights to brand your game for the general distribution, sort of the free version of the game that can go all over the Internet.Interviewer: Sure.Adam: But, you still have full rights as the developer to sell versions of the game to single sites that remove all of that branding or make any other change you want as long as that version of the game is locked to just that single site, that single domain. Of course, you have full rights to sequels and anything else you want to do. Interviewer: How much does it cost an indie to use this service or to put it on the site?Adam: It doesn't cost anything to use the site. If you sell the game through our site, we assess a 10 percent commission. But other than that, there's no cost to upload it and get the feedback from developers.Interviewer: Do you know what games, I mean, does it change in terms of what games are getting sponsored recently? Is it like, genres have their own trends or how does that work?Adam: Yeah, any really good game is going to find a lot of interest. I guess some of the hot stuff right now - tower defense games are still real popular. Physics games using the box 2D engine are very popular.Interviewer: What about multi-player games?Adam: Multi-player is much harder. I mean, the big issue with the multi-player game is supporting that back end server. It's a lot less of an open market on a multi-player game. You almost have to pick the publisher that you're going with before you build the game in order for everything to work out and scale correctly. It makes it a lot harder to just build a great game and get the most value out of it because you're kind of got to make a deal ahead of time.Interviewer: Now, sometimes indies will just put together a game in a week or a few days. Is [...]



Video Interview: Developer from Tag: The Power of Paint, 2009 IGF Student Showcase Winner

2009-04-18T23:45:23.059-07:00

Hey folks,

The GDC interviews are about ready for release...keep a lookout for the 50+ interviews coming out soon on the show :)

Here's the first one...winner of the 2009 IGF Student Showcase...one of the developers of Tag: The Power of Paint


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Btw, if you want help out the show by doing an interview, post a comment with your e-mail info. The comment won't be published, but I'll be able to take the e-mail address and contact you :)

Take care,
Action



Podcast Interview: Billy, Founder of Perfect Dork Studios

2009-03-25T03:41:34.993-07:00

Billy, founder of Perfect Dork Studios, talks about starting his own game studio...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/perfect-dork-studios-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes: Teaser for Box Macabre...Aim for the Brain Promo...Hi. Welcome to the Indie Game Development Podcast show. How about you introduce yourself?Billy: My name is Billy Garretsen, and I am the President and Founder of Perfect Dork Studios located out of Austin, Texas. Thank you for inviting me on the show today.Action: How did you get into games?Billy: My first experience, well, with games was when I was a kid. My parents had an Atari 2600. The first system that I owned was the NES, and I've just been a gamer ever since. My first experience as a developer was when I was in college. I was attending the University of Texas here in Austin. I was 19 years old, and I got approached by a friend whose older brother was forming a game studio. It was a bunch of coders, and they needed someone to generate the creative content. They hired me on to just basically come up with a design document for a game that they thought would take three months. What ended up happening was I got a chance to design my dream game, and it took 12 months. I learned a whole lot just kind of making mistakes and stumbling into it. That was a game for the pocket PC called Blade of Betrayal. It started off; we put it out and got really good press, really good reviews. Almost every review that we had for it was almost a perfect review. It got Action Game 2003, but it did not sell at all. We made zero money, so there were days that I thought I might have been done with it and that I was just going to be a game player, basically, be a watcher instead of a doer.Action: Sure.Billy: When you get down on yourself, it's real easy to do that. But, I think right around the time I started getting into Guitar Hero, just my mind was exploding with different ideas for cool, simple rhythm games but with a twist. Then, one day, I think this was in 2006 I had this concept, this concept for a game that I felt I had to do. I felt like I had to pursue this idea. The game was called Melody Strike, and it was a music rhythm game with a fighting game element to it. It's not really at all like the battle modes in Guitar Hero. If you're familiar with the game, Puzzle Fighter, like the street fighter puzzle game where you are playing a puzzle game but down at the bottom of the screen the two little characters are fighting. Each character has got their set of special moves, depending on how you let the blocks fall. Well, that was the main inspiration for this game called Melody Strike. You, basically, played a rhythm game that was like Guitar Hero, or like the interface actually looked more like Guitar Rhyman [sp]. On the bottom of the screen there were these little characters that were beating each other up based on your performance, and as you built up your special meter you had the ability to pull off super moves and stuff.So the concept, the core concept behind it was: let's play the game like a music game, but let's think in our heads and strategize like we're playing a fighting game because you don't know. You don't want to unleash your super move at the wrong time et cetera so you do have to strategize.At that point I didn't have any programs or anything. It was just me, just me and I hadn't even formed Perfect Dork Studios yet, but I saw that as a great opportunity to form a company and hit the ground running with independent game development. In my mind I was like, you know what? I want this game... What platform do I want to be on? That's one of the questions I always ask myself now after putting Blade of Betrayal on what I thought was the wrong platform at the time.Now, I always think: what audience would like this, and what is the platform that makes the most sense? I was like, you know what, Xbox Live. I know that I'm pro[...]



Podcast Interview: Patrick, Developer of YouTube Street Fighter

2009-03-21T02:23:27.852-07:00

Patrick, developer of the YouTube game called "YouTube Street Fighter" and "Bboy Joker", talks about developing for the new "YouTube Games" genre...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/youtube-streetfighter-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes: Action: Hi, welcome to the Indie Game Development podcast show. With me today is a special guest. How about you introduce yourself?Patrick: My name is Patrick Boivin. I am from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and I am a director. Action: How did you get into games?Patrick: The games, well, I got into games because of YouTube. I saw this year the annotations tools they got in, so I wanted to try it and I knew that with the game principle it would be fun, so that's about it.Action: So, specifically, what game did you just recently make?Patrick: Well, I made three games. The first one some months ago, which was called LaLinea Interactive. It was basically some kind of an animation where you could decide what the character was doing. The second one was YouTube Street Fighter, and it's basically this street fighter game but with stop-motion animation, and you have the possibility to decide the moves you do but on YouTube. The third one is called BBoy Joker, and it's a break dancing competition between the Joker and the Dark Knight. I just uploaded it two days ago.Action: When you started the first game, how did you plan that, and what inspired the theme?Patrick: Well, I was a big fan of Street Fighter. When I was young I played a lot, so I knew this game. This is probably the game I played the most so I have good memories with it. I knew the characters. I knew some tricks about it, so it came quite easily. I think the idea came to me as I saw the action figures of Street Fighter, so this is what started it. The idea started there. Action: Before the Street Fighter game, did you do another game?Patrick: Well, not as what we could call it game. As I said, I made an interactive animation, but it's kind of a game but it's not. YouTube Street Fighter is my first real game, I think.Action: When you first released the Street Fighter game, what happened? I was checking it out on YouTube, and it seems like it got four million views or even something more than that. So, I was just curious how it took off and what was the feedback?Patrick: Well, in fact, I think what people loved the most with that game is that it is the first time that... Well, it's not the real first time, but it looks like it is the first time you have a video game on YouTube. Action: Yeah.Patrick: There was another one, a smaller one, but a few persons saw it. So, this is basically the first official video game on YouTube so that's why I think it went so quick on the view rate. We'll see with the second one I made if it's a good thing to do. I don't know.Action: When you were designing the Street Fighter game, what was involved because it seemed like there has to be a video for every potential sequence or combination, right?Patrick: Yes. What I wanted to do is I wanted to be current. How can I say it? I wanted the energy bar to respect where you were in the game. This kind of multiplied the videos so there is 112 videos for the game.Action: OK.Patrick: And some of them are about the same. The only difference is the energy bar because you have three chance from each side, so six possibilities with four buttons with three different characters. So, this all mixed up gives 112 videos.Action: To render the animations, how long did that take? What was the process involved for that?Patrick: Well, all the process took me 10 days. So, I took three days for the animation, four days for the editing, sound and all this, the graphics, and three more days to put it on YouTube and create all the links between with annotations. There's about 600 links between the videos. So, that was long.Action: Did you have to do extensive testing because t[...]



Indie IPhone Developer Makes 600k in One Month...

2009-02-14T02:58:41.703-08:00

Hey folks,

I'm going to change things up a little...and some of the posts I make are going to relate to posting articles on successful indies...

Check out this indie I-Phone developer...
http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2009/02/shoot-is-iphone.html

Take care,
Action



Podcast Interview: Aaron, Developer of Indie MMO...Domain of Heroes

2009-01-31T18:27:08.779-08:00

Aaron, developer of Indie MMO...Domain of Heroes game, talks about running an MMO...Indie styleYou can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/tandem-games-podcast-64.mp3or listen to it here... Show Notes: Aaron Murray: Hi, my name is Aaron Murray, and I am the founder of Tandem Games. Interviewer: How did you get into games?Aaron: I am a programmer by trade and I've always been messing around with projects with friends for a while. A couple of years ago a buddy of mine and I started doing some game demos and there you have it.Interviewer: What types of games did you initially do? Like what types of demos? Any specific genre or just playing around? Aaron: We had always kind of talked about Xbox live sort of games.Interviewer: Sure.Aaron: Redstro action-type games, but we ended up doing our first demo as a casual game.Interviewer: And so, you do the demo. What happens after that? Did you show it to people? Did you release it on the web?Aaron: For this demo, we took it to the Independent Game Conference in Austin, Texas, and displayed it there at the Game Demo Night. It ended up winning second place in the votes, and it just motivated us to keep doing games.Interviewer: After that demo, were you thinking about doing another casual game or experimenting with another type of genre?Aaron: We had the goal of taking that game and finishing it and releasing it on the portals, but a couple of days after that show we got contacted by a company called Critical Mass. They wanted us to do an advergame based on that game which we did. Interviewer: Was it pretty much then reskinning the game for a specific advertisement, or was it a new game plan entirely or how did that work?Aaron: The way it was pitched to us was a reskin. We thought that would be a great idea, and we started the reskin and decided that we didn't want to use up our idea on this advergame. So, we changed functionally how the player advanced through the game. So, it's kind of a hybrid.Interviewer: Once you finished the advergame, were you thinking about, "Hey, I could, maybe, start an Indie game studio around advergaming" or what were your thoughts then?Aaron: I was definitely against continuing down the road of contract work. That's been the major downfall of games. You get locked in contract mode and as soon as there are a few months where you're waiting on a publisher or something, the whole company can collapse. So, because of that I really wanted to self-fund and be stable.Interviewer: Were you even hesitant to take the adware gaming thing because what I've seen is that some Indie game studios will be like, "I want to do Indie game development", and then they kind of get sucked into the whole contract gig cycle. And it's like an addiction to an extent because you... It's good pay. It can be good pay or it's a good experience or whatever. But at the same time, you know, to do a good job there you are kind of cutting resources on, maybe, your own projects or something else like that. Aaron: It was enticing. The reason we took it was because the company we did the game for - they are giving the game away for free on USB key chains at the GDC.Interviewer: Cool.Aaron: We thought that was kind of cool to have our game be schwag. But, then we did get, man, probably three or four more offers right after that game for other games and turned them all down because of, like you said, doing those games means we can't do our own games. Doing stuff that I don't want to do is like a normal job, and I have a normal job.Interviewer: Did you start going to GDC then around the time where you started developing these demos, or did you just focus on the local community where you were at to get game development inspiration and stuff like that?Aaron: I went to the GDC in San Francisco last year for the first time in 2007 - 2008, sorry. Then, I wen[...]



Podcast Interview: Tom, developer of the Google Maps Real World Racer Game...

2009-01-20T22:48:41.224-08:00

Tom, developer of the Real World Racer game, talks about the challenges of making a game for Google Maps and the creative process behind making indie games...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/real-world-racer-podcast.mp3or listen to it here... Here is a video of the game...Show Notes: Tom Scott. Hello.Interviewer: Hi. Welcome to the Indie Game Development Podcast show. How about you introduce yourself?Tom: Well, hello. My name is Tom Scott. I am from York in England. I designed Real World Racer and a load of other games. I am currently and accidentally Student Union President at the University of York.Interviewer: How did you get into Indie Game Development?Tom: Mostly by accident as with most things I do. I tend to get ideas rather than trying to go into certain fields. One day some idea will spark itself into my head, and I'll think, OK, I'll build that. I'll spend a few hours or a few days putting something together. If it works, great. If it doesn't, well such is life. Something else will be along in a minute.Interviewer: So, you got some game ideas, then, I take it? How did you motivate yourself to do stuff quickly because I know that some other game developers, they get an idea. They'll put it on hold, or they'll just work on other stuff instead of the actual idea that they had. Tom: I tend to find that's a good barometer for whether the idea is good enough. If it's a good idea and it's something that I should go with, then generally I find myself kind of compelled to code it.I'll sit down and just type for a while and test it and in this case swear it and Javascript for a very, very long time. But, after a few days I'll put it together. The really handy thing when I was designing Real World Racer is I was actually on vacation. I was in Helsinki for three months and found myself with a week to spare with a laptop, an Internet connection and a nice, sunny beach to sit on for a while. And so, that's where I did it when I had very little else to do for a while. Interviewer: For the audience, can you talk about what Real World Racer is?Tom: It is a racing game designed around the Google Maps engine. It's got a Google Maps interface. You normally see those little red spikes that get driven into the ground on Google's maps. They are replaced with cars, and the poly lines that normally make up street directions become the actual race track. So, you go along; you hit checkpoints; you reach the end. And at the same time there is very, very rudimentary Javascript AI cars racing against each other.Interviewer: So, you were in Helsinki. When did you get inspired by this idea, and what compelled you? Why did you feel that it was going to be really interesting to do?Tom: I'm not entirely sure. I never am with ideas like this. I had been working on the Google Maps API for something else.Actually, I do remember. I was trying to find the Javascript routine required to move markers on the map rather than sort of destroy them and recreate them. Google added this really, really efficient move marker thing, and so it just popped into my head that I could use this as a game.The initial thought was a kind of a battleships Risk-type game, Naval Command. After a couple of minutes it changed itself into a car racing game because that was sort of the driving directions, API and all these other things. And everything just came together. I thought, ""Yes, I'm going to build that. It's going to be great."" Interviewer: And so, you had a week there and you just spent a week then building it or what was the process?Tom: Pretty much. Where I was, my girlfriend at the time had gotten an internship at a company in Helsinki because I'm from England. She said, ""Do you want to go for the ride?"" I thought, may as well. So, I basically had an apartment to myself 9 to 5 eac[...]



Podcast Interview: Developer of Galaxy Scraper, IGF Student Finalist...

2008-11-28T13:36:23.992-08:00

Carlos, developer from Galaxy Scraper, talks about developing the game...

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/galaxy-scraper-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Game Video:
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Take care,
Action



Podcast Interview: Developer from Empyreal Nocturne, IGF Student Finalist

2008-11-05T21:27:48.055-08:00

Reed, one of the developers of Empyreal Nocturne, talks about developing the game...

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/empyreal-nocturne-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Podcast Interview: Arist for Snapshot Adventures: Secret of Bird Island...

2008-11-05T21:30:20.529-08:00

Diane, from Large Animal Games, talks about developing Snapshot Adventures: Secret of Bird Island

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/snapshot-adventures-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Game Video:
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Podcast Interview: Developer of Goo

2008-11-09T16:43:02.372-08:00

Tommy, from Pillowfort Games, talks about developing Goo!

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/goo-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Game Video:
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Podcast Interview: Developer of Flashback, IGF Student Finalist...

2008-11-09T16:43:26.814-08:00

Developer of Flashback, talks about developing the game

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/flashback-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
(embed)

Screenshot:
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You can download the game here...

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Podcast Interview: Producer of Polarity, IGF Student Finalist...

2008-11-09T16:44:01.684-08:00

Dan, producer of Polarity, talks about developing the game

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/polarity-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Podcast Interview: Developer of Cinnamon Beats, IGF Finalist...

2008-11-09T16:44:36.283-08:00

Jani, from Secret Exit, talks about developing the innovative audio/physics game...Cinnamon Beats

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/cinnamon-beats-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Check out a video of the game here...
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Podcast Interview: Kodo, IGF Mobile Finalist...

2008-11-09T16:45:20.419-08:00

Jonas, from Jadestone, talks about mobile game development...

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/jadestone-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
(embed)

Here is a rough idea of how the gameplay works...
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Podcast Interview: Nom 3, IGF Mobile Finalist

2008-11-09T16:46:00.323-08:00

A discussion with the developers of Nom 3 about mobile game development and the game market in Korea...


You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/nom3-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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You can see a demo here...
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Podcast Interview: 3D Lawn Darts...IGF Mobile Finalist

2008-11-09T16:47:09.689-08:00

Andrew, from Lightning Toads, talks about developing games for mobile phones...

You can download the podcast here...
http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/3dlawndarts-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
(embed)

You can see a demo here...
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Podcast Interview: Some more Indie Game Developers from SF GDC...

2008-11-05T20:39:31.474-08:00

Some more indie game developers + a student game developer (developer of Mayhem Intergalactic) talk about developing games for the Internet among other things...You can download the podcast here...http://www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/mayhem-intergalactic-podcast.mp3or listen to it here...Show Notes: INDIEGAME DEVELOPMENT POD CAST SHOWYou are listening to Indie game pod cast show sponsored by curio soft kid’s game and the letter e visit the ww.indigamepod.com. Thanks again for listening to the show .this interview is inspired by quick meet up at the game developer’s conference.HOST: I m here at GDC and with me are two Indie game developers. How about you introduce you’re self? (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): Hi I am . I am a free lance game developer and next to me is Chris pelling also an Indie game developer.HOST: What types of Indie games do you guys develop? (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): I have in the past three years developed retail tittles with a teem of three or four its me together with the sitting up long and we take roughly 8-9 months for a game with three or four people and yes we have been doing that for the last 4 or 5 years or something and we really like it.HOST: Are you thinking of staying in retail I mean this is whole trance suppose to be a digital distribution. Is this something that you guys consider? (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): Yes it is very lankly that the games that we are selling at this GDC is going to be our last retail title or at least last title last title that we make that is predominantly retail even the title we are doing right now is also available as a downloadable and as again the play station the web browser so we are definitely also feeling that! OH my God we are not going to make retail games anymore. Just hanging around this conference lately.HOST: Sure are you guys sticking up other things that actually laborites to internet as a platform? Since not just about single player. It’s not about single player games on the internet but its about I am not all sir. Are you guys looking for that kind of stuff? (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): The online games can mean so much of like it could be a downloadable that you play against other people through other peoples it mean like a flash game. We are looking at most of that where like I guess everybody is looking at stuff like rune escape and plug cluppingwin and looking at OH my God looks at all the people playing those games. We got to do something like this well. So naturally we are I mean so us including we are looking at that but also at science like shockwave.com and congregate and just in browser games are also market that we are really interested in.HOST: Let me tell you about in browser games are you talking about stuff down in flash or THP stuff. (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): We actually develop a lot of stuff for the shockwave player. So that is mostly 3D action games and 3D adventure games and that’s really allot of other people are making consensive flash which is also great. So but we mostly are 3D games to deal .We mostly talk of the shockwave player.Host: A side from 3D the shockwave really offers a lot of benefits over flash it seems like flash is becoming a predominal platform for like Indie games on the web. (INDIE GAME DEVELOPER): It is. I mean you really have to pick the technology on what you want to do. I mean you could also do the other way around. Unfortunately I also have to realize that if you do not have to do 3D t[...]



Podcast Interview: Developer of Battleships Forever

2008-10-24T20:55:13.144-07:00

Sean, developer of Battleships Forever, talks about developing a game.

You can download the podcast here...
http//www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/battleshipsforever-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Podcast Interview: Michael from Akith Games

2008-10-24T20:56:27.145-07:00

Michael, from Akith Games, talks about the creative process behind his game designs.

You can download the podcast here...
http//www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/akithgames-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Podcast Interview: Andrew from IBeta Quality Assurance talks about QA for Indie Games...

2008-09-24T14:42:59.949-07:00

Andrew, from IBeta Quality Assurance, talks about QA for indie games...

You can download the podcast here...
http//www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/ibeta-podcast.mp3

or listen to it here...
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Podcast Interview: Ryan talks about student game development...

2008-10-07T11:11:56.579-07:00

Ryan, talks about student game development...You can download the podcast here...http//www.indiegamepod.com/podcasts/ou2-podcast.mp3or listen to it here...Show Notes (thanks to Grace):Interview with Ryan , on sound effects, gaming, and animation.Interview was held at the Austin Game Developer’s Conference. Ryan was part of team of 9 developing a platform, puzzle, interactive environment concept game called “Death by Design”. The team consisted of 3 designers, 2 programmers, 1 sound person, and 2 artists. [yes we’re missing somebody]The game started as a class project with a deadline of 20 weeks. The team started with a couple of different ideas. One idea was an incredible machine type game, the other was something called “Death Quest” where the idea was to get your avatar killed in the most extreme way.They did rapid proto typing using paper and a magnet board. They used this method along with design documents and had their idea pretty well done before beginning programming or artwork. Once they had their idea down they then let their imaginations go wild, taking the concept as far as they wanted without limitations of reality (programming concerns for example). If they hadn’t done this then they would have self-sensored and it wouldn’t have been as good. They ended with a fully realized concept.Most people who create platform games follow a standard formula: Run right, keep the character alive for as long as possible, pick up a few objects, and then move onto the next level. They chose a static world, still picked up a few objects, but then completed some crazy objectives, and then something really silly and stupid would happen to the avatar. It was a lot of fun.The team would have something called game jams every week at coffee houses. Here they would take 24 hours to work out concepts and levels to the point where they were complete. Initially they came up with 12 levels but in the end the game was completed with only 2 levels. They were working on it up until 3 hours to deadline. They felt successful that they had actually completed the game. During the whole process there was never a slow period where they felt like they were just finishing up. The whole time they were like “Oh my God! There are problems!! There are problems!!”. Once the game was done though, it was the best feeling. There were issues. One issue is that everyone wants to be a designer, so if you are on the design team you should roll with it and listen to all suggestions, take it in, because everyone has something to contribute. If these people are working in games, then their gamers, and they know what gamers like. All their input is useful. If you then get a chance to use testers outside of the team, listen to all of their suggestions too. As part of the design team you need to keep your team moving, but you also don’t want to beat them into the ground. Top 3 things Ryan learned:1) No matter what you think it’s going to look like in the beginning, it won’t look like that in the end – and that’s not a bad thing! It probably means you learned something. Also be open to outside input, it’s very valuable.2) Don’t take ALL the outside input! You can lose the integrity of your personal touch. 3) Working with people is challenging, but rewarding in the end. Advice to wanna be indy game developers – Come to Austin Game Developer’s Conference!Take care,Action[...]