Subscribe: Comments for this is my defective kit.
http://defectivekit.com/comments/feed/
Preview: Comments for this is my defective kit.

Comments for Defective Kit



it's not broken.



Last Build Date: Mon, 06 Feb 2017 04:53:06 +0000

 



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ian

Mon, 06 Feb 2017 04:53:06 +0000

Just a tip about where to keep the screws and a template of each layer you are working on. Use a small sheet of polystyrene and a cd marker pen, then simply draw a box and any panel spaces from the underside of the laptop. Remove the screws and push them into the polystyrene in the appropriate places, if there are missing screws note them on the template. Remove the underside plastic casing using credit cards to hold open and splice the casing apart and then draw another box for the inside where the motherboard meets the topside. To locate the screws that attach the motherboard to the topside when reassembling I always colour marker pen on the motherboard where the screws are before removing them, as frequently there are holes on the motherboard that either are not used or the underside case screws go through them. Write on the wifi card the aerial connection colours. Always use a torque screwdriver to prevent over-tightening as this can cause a lot of damage. Seeing as the laptop is open, clean all the vents and the fan and re-heatsink paste the CPU. Using the polystyrene template means you can keep the disassembled laptop stored for sometime and rebuild it easily without having to remember or think, which is always a bonus.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 17:46:10 +0000

Its probably shorted inside the plug or the socket is loose and causing solder to heat up the motherboard and eventually it will smoke or catch fire. First try a different adaptor to see, then you are best to have the socket repaired. With the plug out of the socket, wiggle and flex the end of the plug, if you hear snapping sparks, or it stays hot then adaptor is bad and should replace it BEFORE it catches on fire and burns down the house!. Plus all the stress it placed on the adaptor means you probably should not trust it anymore. They are dirt cheap universal or otherwise under $20.00 I bet your wanting to see sparks and flames is not worth that much risk.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 17:40:44 +0000

Actually the third pin is as you say a sense voltage. It tells the charger the battery condition. It is not an OK thing for the Dell. Heres why. Even 2 pin Dell notebooks as well as HP notebooks have sensing of the voltages coming into the notebook. If the voltage dips under demand that triggers the bios and detection circuits to stop charging the battery as it would collapse the power supply. Usually the problem is the charger is not the correct wattage. I.E. 45 watt or 65 watt when unit requires 90 watt. The transistor you mention is actually a diode used to provide a voltage drop and prevent battery to feed voltage back to the adapter when it is not plugged into AC. Universal models do bypass this and tie the third pin to + line. This allows it to never see a voltage drop as long as the universal supply can provide enough amps/wattage to power the unit.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 17:31:45 +0000

The clicking you mentioned is a sing of the hard drive failing. I would create a backup of your entire computer, ASAP to another external hard drive perhaps or at least to a DVD or Cloud Storage for the important stuff. Its going to eventually quit on you however (maybe).



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 06:15:36 +0000

Is this the very thin and lightweight XPS? Those have a very flimsy jack, but even more they have flaky AC adapters. On the one I looked at the DC jack is not soldered to the board, but plugs into the board via a 3 inch small cable, and sits over near the edge of the lower left corner of the notebook. Most likely it may have a broken trace, but often you can fix it by jumpering a wire over to the point where power is fed into the board where the surface mount fuses are located. Finding this point however can be tricky. It may be on the bottom side of the board. First is the LED on the adaptor lit up? And you can measure voltage with a cheap multimeter to verify it is getting a good connection. Sadly dell made very cheap power sockets for these small notebooks. Make sure it is at least 45 watt also. If it is the small XPS I speak of then be sure to check you got the plug pushed into the motherboard properly oriented and secure. It might be in backwards flipped over. On the one I fixed it has the plug with 4 tiny pins. The plug should fit in snug but not force. The pins are offset to fit only 1 way. Also on the one I fixed the metal tab on the power jack may need to be very slightly bent, you can see it which is the contact to the outside part of the jack.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 05:48:52 +0000

No. you probably need to reseat the video cable and or power cable running to the inverter that sits below the LCD display. Can you see a pciture if you shine a desk lamp or flashlight onto the screen? If so the inverter has failed or not making connection. You normally would not take apart the display when fixing the power jack however.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 05:42:51 +0000

Oh they do but not so easily. You can still break the plug easily, and or short it out to fry the adapter. Those who can afford a MAC congrats, but what happens when you want to run software written only to work with the hardware of a PC? HAHA your screwed.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 05:40:04 +0000

Several companies sell adapters to allow you to remove the hard drive out of the notebook, and connect it to any other computer via USB port. Then you can just copy over all needed data. If it is a SATA drive, you MIGHT be able to just hook it up into a desktop computer using a spare SATA cable and possibly may need a IDE to Sata power adapter cable. The one I have cost me $25.00



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 05:33:41 +0000

Did you have them test it with your adaptor? Maybe the adaptor is wrong wattage or has failed. Otherwise they did not fix it. It has to at least run without the battery.



Comment on Guide to fixing a laptop power jack. A Do-it-yourselfer by Ken Bouchard

Fri, 03 Jan 2014 05:31:27 +0000

Has anyone ever heard of "Chip Quick"? Its a special flux paste that will lower the normal melting point of solder so you can easily remove without melting plastic or destroying traces. Google it online and order a small bottle and all your troubles will go away.