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Preview: Ohioana Authors

Ohioana Authors



52 radio features celebrating Ohio's rich literary and historical heritage and Ohio's contribution to American culture through the written word.



Published: Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:52:57 -0500

Last Build Date: Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:52:57 -0500

Copyright: Copyright 2000-2005 - WOSU
 



Angela Johnson

Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:52:57 -0500

From humble beginnings in Tuskegee, Alabama, to a reading-centric family life in small-town Ohio, Angela Johnson is living her dream. Johnson's deep love for children and her early-life inspiration to write joined forces to steer her career. Giving up her pursuit of a college degree at Kent State University and a career in special education, Johnson turned wholeheartedly to writing and working in childcare in the 1980s. Through a stroke of luck and the help of a fellow writer, Johnson has gone on to publish nearly 40 books for children. Her award-winning work ranges from board books for young readers to gritty young adult novels.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/johnson.mp3




Elsie Janis

Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:39:53 -0500

Elsie Janis—child actor, Vaudevillian, stage and film performer, writer, director, songwriter—was born Elsie Jane Bierbower in Columbus, Ohio. Janis's career in the performing arts was long and varied—from her childhood when she began doing imitations of celebrities in Vaudeville, to her starring roles on the stages of New York, London, and Paris, to the battlefield where she entertained troops in France and England during World War I, to Hollywood where she acted, wrote for film, and supervised productions.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/janis.mp3




Louis Bromfield

Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:26:00 -0500

Mansfield native Louis Bromfield attained worldwide acclaim in the 1920s as the author of Early Autumn, his third novel and winner of the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. At age 29, Bromfield was regarded as one of America's most promising young novelists, compared to the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. His books created a path to the world of Hollywood — Bromfield's novels were among the first adapted for feature-length sound films.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/bromfield.mp3




Rod Serling

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

As one of television's most gifted writers, Serling used science fiction to challenge the prejudices he saw in America.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/serling.mp3




Nikki Giovanni

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Nikki Giovanni began a distinguished career as a poet, teacher, and speaker that has spanned three and a half decades. Gloria Naylor calls her "one of our national treasures." She is one of the most highly regarded'and'controversial, poets alive today.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/giovanni.mp3




Joan Chase

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

As a young girl, Joan loved to visit her Ohioan relatives on their farms, and this may have led her to base her first and most highly regarded book, During the Reign of the Queen of Persia, on an Ohio farm.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/chase.mp3




Sherwood Anderson

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Sherwood Anderson was a man who demonstrated all sides of the American dream: a working boy, a businessman, and a worldly artist in the same lifetime.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/anderson.mp3




Charles Chesnutt

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Sylvia Lyons Render points out in her introduction to "The Short Fiction of Charles W. Chesnutt," because of his fair complexion, Chesnutt could have "passed" for white; instead "he chose to remain identified as an Afro-American and sought to remove rather than to avoid various forms of discrimination."


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/chesnutt.mp3




Karen Harper

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Karen Harper is the acclaimed author most noted for her historical mystery novels, with a young Queen Elizabeth I as their central character. But before she reached this genre, she was a high school English teacher in Columbus, Ohio.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/harper.mp3




Harriet Beecher Stowe

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Speak the name of Harriet Beecher Stowe and one's thoughts immediately go to Uncle Tom's Cabin'one of the few works by a nineteenth-century American woman writer still read and taught in American universities today.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/underground_rr.mp3




Ann Hagedorn

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Ann Hagedorn's Beyond the River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad tells the remarkable story of the participants in the Ripley line of the Underground Railroad, bringing to life the struggles of the men and women, black and white, who fought "the war before the war" along the Ohio River.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/underground_rr.mp3




Katherine Ayres

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Katherine Ayres's novels revolve around the moral and ethical dilemmas experienced by boys and girls living along the Underground Railroad, and in doing so, she highlights the fact that the decisions we make in life are never easy ones.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/underground_rr.mp3




Lois McMaster Bujold

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Bujold is best known for her science fiction series centered upon the character of Miles Vorkosigan, a brilliant military leader with physical disabilities, who lives in a world that values physical perfection.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/bujold.mp3




Dawn Powell

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Dawn Powell's eye for paradox may be what made her novels such accurate portrayals of upper-middle-class life in New York and small-town Ohio from the 1920s to the mid-60s. Her characters are painfully realistic, full of flaws, at once sympathetic and despicable.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/powell.mp3




Erma Bombeck

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Erma Bombeck's best-selling books and syndicated newspaper column, At Wit's End, satirized the suburbs and the tedium of motherhood and housewifery. Housewives in "typical" homes across the country claimed that Bombeck understood them like no one else; they laughed at her columns with both delight and relief.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/bombeck.mp3




Hart Crane

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Harold Hart Crane lived a tumultuous life. Over the course of his 33 years, he traveled frequently between Cleveland and New York City, searching for love and companionship from men and women, longing to return to the "home" he'd never really had. He published several well-received poems including The Bridge, and made notable, devoted friends like William Carlos Williams, Sherwood Anderson, and Allen Tate. Tragically, the alcoholic tendencies which sometimes inspired his work also led to his early demise.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/crane.mp3




Lois Lenski

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Believing that books for children were under a greater obligation than to merely entertain, Lenski wrote that they "should illumine the whole adventure of living." Many of her books focus in on daily life for children in carefully researched historical time periods or regions of the country she experienced first-hand. Lois met and wrote about children in poor, rural communities underrepresented in children's literature in a realistic, unsentimental way. She said, "Life is full of amazing drama if we have the awareness to see and understand it."


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/lenski.mp3




Ambrose Bierce

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Ambrose Bierce, also called "Bitter Bierce," was known for his biting wit. Born in Meigs County, Ohio, he became the only war writer of his time to have actually experienced battle, after enlisting in the Indiana Infantry to fight the Civil War and sustaining a bullet wound to the head. His wartime experiences inspired much of his writing; his injury might have inspired much of his cynicism. His best known works include An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, which took place during the Civil War, and The Devil's Dictionary, an encyclopedia of sarcasm, from which the headings for his "Highlights of a Life" were taken.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/bierce.mp3




Mary Oliver

Tue, 06 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Cleveland native Mary Oliver has won many awards for her poetry, including the National Book Award, and in 1984, the Pulitzer Prize. When news of the award arrived, however, there was no fanfare, no interruption of her daily life. Mary Oliver accepted congratulations from friends around the country and quietly went back to work. "I suppose it would be more interesting if I were different," she was quoted in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, April 19, 1984. "I simply do not distinguish between work and play."


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/oliver.mp3




James Wright

Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

James Wright, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, was born in Martins Ferry, Ohio. A newspaper editor once expressed astonishment that the Depression-era, dilapidated steel and coal mining town, between the Midwest rust belt and Appalachia, could have produced such a refined poetic voice.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/wright.mp3




Mark Winegardner

Mon, 26 Dec 2005 00:00:00 -0500

Mark Winegardner grew up among the Dum Dum suckers and Etch A Sketch toys of Bryan, Ohio, where he learned to love road trips from his RV-dealing father, baseball from his sports fan granddad, and reading from a friendly Williams County librarian. Who would have known, when he was booted from his Little League team and rejected from five creative-writing programs, that he would one day direct a creative writing department, publish several books about baseball, and win the nomination to write one of the most talked-about books of the new millennium, The Godfather Returns.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/winegardner.mp3




Rita Dove

Tue, 28 Feb 2006 00:00:00 -0500

Rita Dove is a rarity in many ways, one being that she's a poet with a high public profile. She was the youngest and first African-American Poet Laureate of the United States, and one of the few to carry the post for two years, from 1993 to 1995.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/dove.mp3




Alix Kates Shulman

Tue, 28 Feb 2006 00:00:00 -0500

Alix Kates Shulman's appetite for challenge has motivated her writing and her life, whether she was taking on math and philosophy graduate work, questioning restrictions on women in the 1950s and 60s, or surviving alone on a desert island.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/shulman.mp3




Mildred Wirt Benson (Carolyn Keene)

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Hired in 1930 to ghostwrite a new series about a female teen detective, Mildred Wirt Benson defined a character, Nancy Drew, that was a striking contrast to the dull, demure heroines of the early 1900s.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/benson.mp3




Thomas Berger

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

While Thomas Berger is well enough liked for his most popular novels such as Little Big Man, Neighbors, and The Feud, many critics claim that he doesn’t get the attention he deserves.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/berger.mp3




Kay Boyle

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Always blending her devotion to art and social justice, Kay Boyle published prolifically in fiction, and wrote about the compelling issues of the day: the war against fascism, the struggle against McCarthy, the fight for racial and sexual equality, and the war in Vietnam.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/boyle.mp3




David Catrow

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

David Catrow’s day job is with the Springfield News-Sun; he creates popular editorial cartoons, now syndicated in more than 900 newspapers. Beyond the editorial pages, his signature zany illustrations delight a much younger audience that has come to love Catrow for his picture books.



Peter Morton Coan

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Peter Morton Coan won a spot on the New York Times best-selling list for his 1998 release of Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words (reprinted in 2004). Considered the definitive work on the subject of Ellis Island, Coan’s book contains the stories of more than 130 people who were among the millions of immigrants who came through New York’s infamous “Golden Door” between 1892 and 1954.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/coan.mp3




Jenny Crusie

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Jenny Crusie is the pseudonym for Jennifer Smith, a Wapakoneta, Ohio-born writer of romances.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/crusie.mp3




Michael Dirda

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Michael Dirda has been a writer and senior editor for "The Washington Post Book World" for more than 25 years. He writes a Sunday column about books, from new-book reviews to reflections on neglected masterpieces. His work earned him the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/dirda.mp3




Paul Laurence Dunbar

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Born to ex-slaves in 1872, Paul Laurence Dunbar became the first African American to achieve prominence as a poet. Though he lived only 33 years, Dunbar rose to international fame for his signature dialect verse or “plantation talk.”


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/dunbar.mp3




Allan Eckert

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

A resident of Bellefontaine, Ohio, 74-year old Allan Eckert has won distinction as a historian, naturalist, novelist, poet, screenwriter and playwright. His 1967 historical novel, The Frontiersmen, was adapted to the popular outdoor drama, TECUMSEH.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/eckert.mp3




Wil Haygood

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Wil Haygood’s books include Two on the River, which chronicles a 2,000 mile journey down the Mississippi, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and In Black and White: The Life of Sammy Davis Jr. But Haygood is best known for his 1997 biography, The Haygoods of Columbus: A Family Memoir.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/haygood.mp3




O. Henry

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

From 1898 to 1901, William Sydney Porter completed some of his best work while living in Columbus – behind bars at the federal penitentiary. Sentenced to serve five years for embezzlement, Porter used the time to write short stories under the pseudonym, O. Henry, and lived to become one of the finest storytellers in American literature.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/o_henry.mp3




Ronald Himler

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Artist and Cleveland native Ronald Himler has illustrated more than 150 children’s books. The award-winning picture books The Wall, and Fly Away Home, were illustrated by Himler and written by Eve Bunting.



William Dean Howells

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

With his prolific output and his love for literature and humanity, William Dean Howells certainly earned his title, “The Dean of American Letters.” He spent fifteen years as editor of the Atlantic Monthly, transforming the publication into a highly-regarded magazine. He introduced British and European writers to American audiences, and helped jump-start the careers of such important American writers as Henry James and Mark Twain. Howells also published his own poetry, literary criticism, plays, short fiction, and novels.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/howells.mp3




Langston Hughes

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Langston Hughes (1902 – 1967) went from the uncertainty and obscurity of being black and poor into the world of artistic and material success, without much but a love of words and boundless energy to make something of himself.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/hughes.mp3




Fannie Hurst

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Hamilton, Ohio-born Fannie Hurst was a prolific writer and best-selling novelist for more than 40 years. Hurst produced nearly a title a year in the 1920s and wrote until her death in 1968. Accenting her career as a novelist, Hurst also found success as a playwright, screenwriter, television personality, lecturer and activist.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/hurst.mp3




John Jakes

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

John Jakes hit pay-dirt in 1974 with his series of historical fiction novels that traces the lives of one family from 1776 forward. The assignment turned out to be one of the most successful series of mass-market fiction ever published, the Bicentennial Series, also known as The Kent Family Chronicles.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/jakes.mp3




Josephine Johnson

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

While Conrad Richter’s books portrayed – and glorified – the conquest of the land by pioneers, Josephine Johnson’s work acknowledged nature’s ultimate power over man, and advocated letting the land return to its natural state.



Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee are best known as the team that wrote Inherit the Wind, Auntie Mame and The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. Together they wrote 39 shows for the stage, including 14 Broadway productions, over and above an award-studded body of work that includes radio drama, screenplays, television shows and books.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/lawrence_lee.mp3




Jack Matthews

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Novelist, poet and, most recently, playwright, Jack Matthews is the author of six novels, five short story collections, three books of essays and one book of poems.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/matthews.mp3




Robert McCloskey

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Beloved children’s book author and illustrator, Robert McCloskey, captivated generations of readers with his award-winning books including Make Way for Ducklings, Lentil, and Blueberries for Sal. Born and raised in Hamilton, Ohio, McCloskey was the first two-time winner of the prestigious Caldecott Medal for children’s book illustration.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/mccloskey.mp3




Toni Morrison

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Nobel prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison is one of the most prominent authors in world literature. Born Chloe Anthony Wofford, her most widely read novel is Beloved (1987), which won the Pulitzer Prize and was adapted for a TV movie series. In 1993 she became the 11th American writer to win the Nobel Prize.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/morrison.mp3




Mary Orr

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Given her beginnings as an actress, however, it fits that Mary Orr should be best known for writing the short story on which the Academy Award-winning film “All About Eve” was based. “The Wisdom of Eve,” Mary Orr’s short story, is a Broadway satire, published in Cosmopolitan magazine a few years after she began co-writing plays with her husband, Reginald Denham.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/orr.mp3




Norman Vincent Peale

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Ohio native Norman Vincent Peale broke new ground in Christian ministry when he discovered mass media as a means to spread his gospel beyond the pulpit to the homes of millions. His 1952 best-seller, The Power of Positive Thinking, is considered the ancestor for a generation of inspirational self-help books.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/peale.mp3




James Purdy

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

A native of Fremont, Ohio, Purdy’s fiction continues to be more highly-respected in Europe than in the U.S. Since he began writing in the 1940s, Purdy has composed countless poems, short stories, and has written 19 novels, including the 1959 underground classic, Malcolm.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/purdy.mp3




James Reston

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

In his first assignment as a New York Times Washington correspondent, James (Scotty) Reston won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for reporting. The exclusive series of articles outlining plans to create the United Nations prompted an FBI investigation, and put Reston on the map as a powerful foreign policy journalist.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/reston.mp3




Conrad Richter

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Conrad Richter won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, The Town, in 1951. The book was the third in what became known as Richter’s Ohio Trilogy, later published in one volume entitled The Awakening Land: The Trees, The Fields, The Town.



Michael J. Rosen

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Michael J. Rosen has been the literary director of the Thurber House in Columbus since 1983. Rosen edited Collecting Himself: James Thurber on Writing and Writers, Humor, and Himself. He’s also written numerous silly and charming children’s books of his own.



Julie Salamon

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Within the past decade, journalist and author Julie Salamon has won acclaim for her compelling and insightful works of nonfiction. Born and raised in the Appalachian community of Seaman, Ohio, Salamon has written a series of award-winning titles, including Facing the Wind (2001), The Net of Dreams (1996), and, most recently, Rambam’s Ladder (2003).


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/salamon.mp3




Helen Hooven Santmyer

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Helen Hooven Santmyer gave hope to late bloomers when she became a best-selling author at the age of 88. The nursing home resident of Xenia, Ohio was nearly blind and confined to a wheelchair when she wrote the final pages of “…And Ladies of the Club.”


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/santmyer.mp3




Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

In scholarly circles, 88-year-old Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. has been a distinguished contributor to American history since, at the age of 20, he wrote his first critically-acclaimed book. The two-time Pulitzer Prize winner has written 18 books and countless essays on liberal theory. He is one of America’s most influential historians, as well as a champion of Democratic and liberal policies.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/schlesinger.mp3




Gloria Steinem

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Toledo native Gloria Steinem is one of the most influential feminists of our time. In 1972, Steinem co-founded Ms. Magazine, and later established the Ms. Magazine Foundation, which promotes self-esteem among girls with initiatives like the “Take Your Daughter to Work Day.” In addition to her work as a journalist, Steinem is the author of several books, including the best-selling Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions (1983) and Revolution from Within: A Book of Self-Esteem (1992).


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/steinem.mp3




R.L. Stine

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Columbus native R.L. Stine went from being an obscure magazine editor to the best-selling children's author in history, passing such prolific novelists as Stephen King, John Grisham and Tom Clancy. Stine rose to fame in the early nineties, when he launched the wildly popular Goosebumps, a series featuring spooky tales for ages eight to eleven.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/stine.mp3




Peter Taylor

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

Peter Taylor won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, A Summons to Memphis, late in his career. A Summons to Memphis contained the qualities that Taylor was best known for: a natural ear for dialogue, a smooth, well-paced style, and a sensitive character portrayal.



James Thurber

Tue, 29 May 2007 00:00:00 -0500

The most celebrated author to hail from Columbus, Ohio, James Thurber is generally regarded as the greatest American humorist since Mark Twain. Thurber's best-known characters are Walter Mitty, his snarling wife, and silently observing animals. Despite an accident in childhood that left him with one eye, Thurber wrote close to 40 books, including collections of essays, short stories, fables, and children's stories.


Media Files:
http://www.ohioana-authors.org/radio/thurber.mp3