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Preview: Lawyer2Lawyer - Law News and Legal Topics

Lawyer 2 Lawyer - Law News and Legal Topics





Published: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 19:18:27 +0000

Last Build Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 20:15:36 +0000

Copyright: Legal Talk Network
 



Legal Issues Facing Our Veterans

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 19:18:27 +0000

After our veterans return from combat or active duty, they can face a host of legal issues upon returning to the reality of home. From homelessness stemming from evictions and foreclosures to child custody disputes to problems with benefits, veterans can have various legal needs due to their lengthy separation from home and are in need of assistance. But there is help for these individuals and the legal community is making strides in assisting our veterans in these legal disputes.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join attorney Richard V. Spataro, director of training and publications for National Veterans Legal Services Program and Robert Liscord, veteran legal services outreach coordinator and paralegal for Pine Tree Legal Assistance, as they take a look at various legal issues facing our veterans. They will discuss legal needs and how attorneys and organizations are assisting veterans with their legal issues.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/legal-issues-facing-our-veterans.mp3?dest-id=171194




Law Enforcement and the Use of Robots

Fri, 02 Sep 2016 16:13:27 +0000

In July, a sniper, later identified as Micah Xavier Johnson, opened fire at a march against fatal police shootings, held in downtown Dallas, Texas, killing 5 police officers and wounding many others. After a 45 minute gun battle and hours of negotiation with the sniper, who was holed up in a parking garage, Dallas Police Chief David Brown gave an order to his SWAT team to come up with a plan to end the mayhem before more police officers were killed.  

This led to the use of as robot, the Remotec Androx Mark V A-1, manufactured by Northrup Grumman and a pound of C-4 explosive, which was sent in eventually killing the sniper.

Today on Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi  join attorney Edward Obayashi, deputy sheriff and legal advisor for the Plumas County Sheriff's Office and Dr. Peter Asaro,  assistant professor and director of graduate programs for the School of Media Studies at the New School for Public Engagement, as they take a look at the recent tragedy in Dallas,  the use of robots by law enforcement, criticism, ethics, policy, and regulation when it comes to the use of robots.

Attorney Edward Obayashi is deputy sheriff and legal advisor for the Plumas County sheriff's office and a licensed attorney in the State of California. Ed’s law office specializes in providing law enforcement legal services to California law enforcement agencies and he also serves as the legal advisor and a legal consultant for numerous law enforcement agencies in California. His duties include patrol, investigations, administration, training, and providing legal advice to department management and personnel.

Dr. Peter Asaro is a philosopher of science, technology, and media. Dr. Asaro is assistant professor and director of graduate programs for the School of Media Studies at the New School for Public Engagement in New York City. He is the co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control and has written on lethal robotics from the perspective of just war theory and human rights. Dr. Asaro's research also examines agency and autonomy, liability and punishment, and privacy and surveillance as it applies to consumer robots, industrial automation, smart buildings, and autonomous vehicles.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/law-enforcement-use-robots.mp3?dest-id=171194




Inside “Making a Murderer” and the Steven Avery Trial

Wed, 17 Aug 2016 19:25:19 +0000

Update: Brendan Dassey, nephew to Steven Avery, the primary defendant from the "Making a Murderer" series on Netflix had his conviction for murder, rape, and mutilation of a corpse overturned by U.S. Magistrate Judge William E. Duffin of the US District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin last Friday. This episode was recorded shortly before the development.

Back on October 31st of 2005, a young photographer named Teresa Halbach went missing. Teresa’s last meeting had been with Steven Avery, on the grounds of Avery's Auto Salvage in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Teresa’s remains were later found on the grounds of Avery’s home and family business. Avery was well known to law enforcement and had previously served a lengthy prison sentence for rape and attempted murder from which he  was later exonerated on DNA evidence.

What transpired inspired the extremely popular Netflix series “Making a Murderer,” directed by Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos. The series spotlights Steven Avery and his quest for justice after claims that he was wrongfully accused in the murder of Teresa Halbach.

In 2005, Steven Avery was arrested for the murder of Teresa Halbach, and was ultimately represented by Wisconsin attorneys, Dean Strang and Jerry Buting. Strang and Buting presented their case and their defense strategy, bringing to light alleged tampering and planting of evidence by police. After a whirlwind of a trial, the verdict came back guilty, sending Steven Avery to jail for life without the possibility of parole. As Steven Avery sits in jail, a new attorney has taken over his case and Steven hopes for a new trial and maybe one day his freedom.

On this special episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi joins Dean Strang, former defense attorney for Steven Avery, and Peter Linton-Smith, a former television news reporter who covered the Avery trials, as they discuss the popular Netflix series, “Making a Murderer.” Dean and Peter  offer inside perspectives and get the latest on Steven Avery and his quest for a new trial and justice under a new attorney.

Dean Strang is a lawyer in Madison, Wisconsin, at the firm Strang Bradley, LLC. He is best known for his work as one of Steven Avery's trial lawyers, as well as for his first book, "Worse Than the Devil: Anarchists Clarence Darrow, and Justice in a Time of Terror." Mr. Strang served five years as Wisconsin’s first federal defender and co-founded Strang Bradley, LLC. He is an adjunct professor at Marquette University Law School, the University of Wisconsin Law School, and University of Wisconsin's Division of Continuing Studies. Mr. Strang is a member of the American Law Institute and serves on several charity boards, including the Wisconsin Innocence Project. His second book will be published in early 2018.

Peter Linton-Smith was a television news reporter for 24 years covering primarily courts (1988-2012). Peter has covered cases ranging from first degree murder, wrongful death, products liability, copyright dispute, employment and labor disputes. Peter has covered Steven Avery, both his civil and criminal case from 2003-2007. Peter is currently employed at Leventhal & Puga in Denver, Colorado.

If you want more on "Making a Murderer," check out the Defending Brendan Dassey of “Making a Murderer” Planet Lex episode, when Dassey's appeal attorneys discuss what it was like defending him.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/inside-making-a-murderer-steven-avery-trial.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Legal Issues Surrounding Pokémon Go

Fri, 05 Aug 2016 16:00:00 +0000

The Pokémon Go App developed by Niantic is the latest craze sweeping the world. The location-based augmented reality mobile game/app produced 15 million downloads in just the first week. The game allows players to capture, battle, and train virtual creatures, called Pokémon, who appear on device screens as though in the real world.

Unfortunately, this popular app has caused some trouble amongst gamers and has created a big threat to public safety. Trespassing on property, muggings, driving distracted, walking into traffic, and falling from cliffs are just some of the incidents stemming from the use of this app. In addition, businesses are attracting customers by adding fantasy characters to their stores, so the implications for liability have increased.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join professor Adam Thimmesch, an assistant professor of law at the University of Nebraska College of Law and attorney Brian Wassom from the firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP as they discuss the Pokémon Go App. They look at the very real legal implications surrounding this popular app, incorporating reality into a fantasy world, and whether Pokémon Go is here to stay or simply a passing fad.

Professor Adam Thimmesch is an assistant professor of law at the University of Nebraska College of Law. Adam focuses his research on the impact of modern technology and markets on existing legal doctrines, with a particular emphasis on tax policy and the regulation of interstate commerce

Attorney Brian Wassom is from the firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP. Brian is the leader of the firm’s social, mobile and emerging media industry group and is a litigator with 15 years of experience focusing his practice on intellectual property matters related to copyright, trademark, trade dress, and publicity rights. He also handles many other types of complex commercial litigation cases, including invasion of privacy, defamation, false and deceptive advertising, data security, and product liability issues.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/legal-issues-surrounding-pokemon-go.mp3?dest-id=171194




The American Bar Association: A Look Ahead Under New President, Linda Klein

Fri, 22 Jul 2016 17:21:56 +0000

The American Bar Association is one of the world’s largest voluntary professional organizations, with nearly 400,000 members and more than 3,500 entities. It is committed to doing what only a national association of attorneys can do: serve members, improve the legal profession, eliminate bias and enhance diversity, and advance the rule of law throughout the United States and around the world.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Linda Klein, president-elect of the American Bar Association, as she takes a look back at the past year as president-elect and looks ahead to her initiatives and mission under her presidency at the American Bar Association.

Linda Klein is president-elect of the American Bar Association. Linda, senior managing shareholder at Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, assumed the role of president-elect of the American Bar Association in August 2015 at the ABA Annual Meeting in Chicago. She is presently serving a one-year term as president-elect then will become ABA president in August 2016.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/american-bar-association-new-president-linda-klein.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Supreme Court End of Term Wrap-Up

Fri, 08 Jul 2016 15:37:01 +0000

On June 27th, the Supreme Court wrapped up its term with some standout cases. Immigration, affirmative action, abortion clinic restrictions, guns and domestic violence, and public corruption are only a few cases that have ended an eventful and, at some times, controversial Supreme Court term. These cases alongside a vacant seat on the Supreme Court have made this term an interesting one to say the least.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Tony Mauro, Supreme Court correspondent for the National Law Journal and Suzanna Sherry, the Herman O. Loewenstein professor of law at Vanderbilt University Law School, as they discuss the Supreme Court's end of term. They will take a look back at the standout cases, the last cases before the term ended, the impact of the loss of Justice Scalia and one less justice, and look forward to the start of next term in October.

Tony Mauro is the Supreme Court correspondent for the National Law Journal. Tony has covered the Supreme Court for over 30 years. During his tenure, Tony has also written about the First Amendment and food, reviewing restaurants for various publications. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife, Kathy Cullinan, and his daughter, Emily Mauro, lives nearby in Arlington.

Suzanna Sherry is the Herman O. Loewenstein professor of law at Vanderbilt University Law School. Her writing focuses primarily on constitutional law and procedures and doctrines of the federal courts, including the Supreme Court. She is the author of seven books, including four textbooks, and more than 75 articles. She received her A.B. from Middlebury College and her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/supreme-court-end-term-wrap-up.mp3?dest-id=171194




Orlando Shooting and Gun Laws

Fri, 01 Jul 2016 19:25:29 +0000

On June 12, 2016, tragedy struck at Pulse, a popular nightclub within the LGBT community in Orlando, Florida, after a gunman, Omar Mateen fatally shot 49 people and injured 53. This tragedy is one of  the deadliest mass shootings in the United States and the nation's worst terror attack since 9/11. In a Father's Day address, President Obama said gun violence was "preventable" and too common. "It's unconscionable that we allow easy access to weapons of war in these places,"  he said.  And just yesterday, a divided Senate voted down 4 gun control measures.

So what needs to change when it comes to gun laws, all while protecting the Second Amendment? And can bipartisan gun legislation curb gun violence and prevent future mass shootings?

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join attorney Steven W. Dulan, first vice chair of the Michigan Coalition of Responsible Gun Owners and Arkadi Gerney, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, as they take a look at gun laws and the tragedy in Orlando. They will talk reaction, the gun control debate, the Second Amendment, Florida gun laws and potential legislation. 

Attorney Steven W. Dulan is first vice chair of the Michigan Coalition of Responsible Gun Owners. MCRGO is the largest state-based firearms advocacy organization in America and its mission is to promote safe use and ownership of firearms through education, litigation, and legislation. Steve has appeared on various media outlets to discuss gun ownership, including CNN (with Christiane Amanpour and Piers Morgan), FOX and Friends, NPR, and HuffPost Live.

Attorney Arkadi Gerney is senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, where he focuses on crime and gun policy. Arkadi previously worked as special advisor and first deputy criminal justice coordinator to former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, where he managed Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a national coalition that Mayor Bloomberg co-chairs. During four and a half years in the New York City mayor’s office, Gerney oversaw the coalition’s growth to more than 600 mayors, led successful campaigns to influence federal legislation, partnered with Walmart to develop a landmark gun seller code of conduct, and led New York City’s undercover investigation of out-of-state gun shows.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/orlando-shooting-gun-laws.mp3?dest-id=171194




Tribal Law, Indian Child Welfare Act, and Custody

Fri, 17 Jun 2016 23:25:22 +0000

In a highly publicized custody case involving a 6-year-old girl, the use of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, a federal law that seeks to keep American Indian children with their American Indian families, has come into play.

The child was recently removed from her foster home after a lower court judge ruled that Lexi’s Choctaw Indian bloodline requires her to live with relatives in Utah.  According to court records, Lexi was moved to foster care four years ago due to her birth mother’s substance abuse problems, her birth father’s criminal history, and custody issues involving both birth parents and other children. Lexi’s foster parents, have since filed an appeal to the California High Court

In this episode of  Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join attorney Lori Alvino McGill, partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Wilkinson Walsh + Eskovitz and Chrissi Nimmo, assistant attorney general for Cherokee Nation, who has represented the nation in tribal, state, and federal courts since 2008, as they take an inside look at this case, tribal law, the Indian Child Welfare Act, and overall child custody cases.

Attorney Lori Alvino McGill is partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Wilkinson Walsh + Eskovitz. Lori’s practice focuses on all aspects of appellate strategy, including issue preservation, briefing, argument, and obtaining (and opposing) Supreme Court review. She has handled high-profile civil and criminal appeals involving a wide range of constitutional and statutory issues in state and federal appellate courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States. Lori is presently representing the foster parents of Lexi and has appealed to the California’s highest court.

Chrissi Nimmo is assistant attorney general for Cherokee Nation and has represented the nation in tribal, state, and federal courts since 2008. Chrissi primarily focuses on the Indian Child Welfare Act and in-house counsel duties for the nation. She represented Cherokee Nation in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl before both the United States Supreme Court and the South Carolina Supreme Court and in Nielson v. Ketchum before the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Chrissi also serves as the Adam Walsh Act Sex Offender Registration and Notification Compliance Office for Cherokee Nation.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/tribal-law-indian-child-welfare-act-custody.mp3?dest-id=171194




Overtime Rule Changes: Impact and Reaction

Fri, 03 Jun 2016 22:12:25 +0000

The Labor Department recently announced regulation changes pertaining to overtime pay for employees and their employers. Under these new rules, those who earn salaries of less than $47,476 a year will automatically qualify for overtime pay of time-and-a-half if they work more than 40 hours a week.

Once the new rules go into effect on December 1, 2016, they will impact 4.2 million workers in the United States.  So what does this mean for business owners and their employees?

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Jane Lauer Barker, a partner at the New York labor and employment firm Pitta & Giblin LLP and Thomas Wassel, a labor and employment partner with the New York firm Cullen and Dykman, as they take a look at these recent overtime rule changes and the impact, pros and cons, and reaction from business owners and the workforce.

Jane Lauer Barker is a partner at the New York labor and employment firm Pitta & Giblin LLP.  Jane concentrates in labor, employment, and employee benefits law and litigation and labor union representation.  Previously, Barker headed up New York State Attorney General's Labor Bureau where she oversaw civil and criminal enforcement of state labor laws and handled appellate litigation.

Thomas Wassel is a labor and employment partner with the New York firm Cullen and Dykman. Tom has been advising employers on a wide range of labor and employment law matters since 1983.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Overtime_Rule_Changes_Impact_and_Reaction.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Panama Papers

Fri, 06 May 2016 17:41:22 +0000

An offshore investment scandal known as the Panama Papers has taken the world by storm. The controversy centers around the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca and its connections to high-ranking political figures, their relatives, celebrities, and business figures, including Iceland Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson.

Recently, a German newspaper announced that 11.5 million confidential documents between 1970 and 2015 had been leaked from the firm to journalists. These "Panama Papers" revealed how clients hid billions of dollars in offshore tax shelters.  There are many issues at hand here: establishing these offshore entities, evading taxes, fraud, laundering money, and overall corruption.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join Jessica Tillipman, the assistant dean for field placement at George Washington Law School and Professor William Byrnes, a member of the law faculty and an associate dean with Texas A&M University School of Law, as they take an inside look at the Panama Papers. They will discuss Mossack Fonseca’s role, shell companies and offshore bank accounts, the issue of data security, tax evasion, investigations into these clients, and future of Mossack Fonseca.

Jessica Tillipman is the assistant dean for field placement at George Washington Law School and an expert in corruption, government ethics, and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. She is a senior editor of the FCPA Blog, which has been following the Panama Papers revelations.

Professor William Byrnes is a member of the law faculty and an associate dean with Texas A&M University School of Law. William held a senior position of international tax for a Big 6 firm and has been commissioned on fiscal policy by a number of governments. He is currently developing a tax and legal risk management online curriculum for professionals. Texas A&M University is the fifth largest U.S. public research institution and one of only 62 institutions to be designated a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/panama-papers.mp3?dest-id=171194




North Carolina's HB2 Controversy, Transgender Legislation, and Litigation

Mon, 25 Apr 2016 18:03:17 +0000

North Carolina’s House Bill 2, better known as the “Bathroom Law”, has taken center stage and has created a great debate. On March 23, 2016, Gov. Pat McCrory signed the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, also known as House Bill 2 or HB2. The law bans people from using bathrooms that don't match the sex indicated on their birth certificates, which opponents argue is discriminatory toward the transgender community.

Supporters of the new law say it is a safety and privacy issue, protecting women and children from men who use the law as a pretense to deliberately enter the wrong restroom. Legislation involving the transgender community is not only happening in the state of North Carolina, but Mississippi and Tennessee have pushed similar legislation as well.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Ilona Turnerlegal director at the Transgender Law Center, Andrew Beckwith, president of the Massachusetts Family Institute and Professor Katie Eyer from Rutgers Law School as they take a look at North Carolina's HB2 controversy, reaction, litigation surrounding HB2, anti-LGBT discrimination bills and LGBT protections nationally, and the quest for equal rights for the transgender community.

Ilona Turner was a staff attorney at the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR), where her work frequently focused on issues affecting transgender clients. She previously practiced law at Cohen, Weiss, & Simon LLP in New York City, representing unions, union-run health and retirement plans, and employees. In the early 2000s she worked as the lobbyist for Equality California, where she helped to shepherd groundbreaking legislation that prohibited housing and employment discrimination against transgender people and dramatically expanded the rights of domestic partners in California.

Andrew Beckwith is a graduate of Gordon College and the University of Minnesota Law School. Andrew is a judge advocate in the United States Marine Corps Reserve where he holds the rank of major. He has also served as an immigration trial attorney for the Boston office of the Department of Homeland Security.

Katie Eyer joined the Rutgers law faculty as an assistant professor in June 2012. Katie also litigated civil rights cases prior to entering academia full time, and secured a number of precedents in the Third Circuit expanding the legal rights of LGBT and disabled employees.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/north-carolina-hb2-transgender-legislation-litigation.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Latest on the FBI/Apple Legal Battle

Fri, 01 Apr 2016 19:11:19 +0000

The FBI and Apple, Inc. have been immersed in an ongoing legal battle over privacy and security. The legal battle reached a boiling point when the FBI and Apple engaged in a dispute over whether the federal court may compel Apple to create new software that would enable the FBI to unlock an iPhone 5C it recovered from one of the shooters in a terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California. So, is this a threat to our data security or will Apple’s assistance to the FBI provide key information needed to prevent future terrorist attacks?

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join David O’Brien, a senior researcher at the Berkman Center and Robert E. Cattanach, a partner with the international law firm Dorsey & Whitney LLP and a former justice department attorney, as they take a look at the latest on the FBI/Apple Legal Battle. They will discuss San Bernardino, encryption, privacy, national security and the future impact of this case.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

 


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/latest-fbi-apple-legal-battle.mp3?dest-id=171194




Justice Antonin Scalia: His Legacy and the Impact of his Death

Fri, 11 Mar 2016 17:02:32 +0000

Last month, Justice Antonin Scalia passed away unexpectedly sparking a huge reaction from the legal and political world. Justice Scalia was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1986 and is known for his conservative position in his rulings. Since his death, there has been great controversy over his replacement on the High Court and the nomination process under President Obama.

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams join Tony Mauro, the Supreme Court correspondent for the National Law Journal and Kevin P. Martin, an appellate and regulatory litigation partner and co-chair of Goodwin Procter’s Appellate Litigation Group and Justice Scalia’s former law clerk, as they discuss the passing of Justice Scalia, his legacy, the controversy over a replacement, and the impact his death will have on the future of the Supreme Court and the laws of the land.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/justice-antonin-scalia-legacy-death.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Flint Water Crisis

Tue, 01 Mar 2016 18:47:21 +0000

There is presently a public health crisis plaguing Flint, Michigan. Lead contamination in the water has led to a major public health danger. Back in 2014, Flint changed its water source from the treated Detroit Water and Sewerage Department water to the Flint River. Since then, Flint’s drinking water has had a host of problems.

This Flint River water then caused lead from aging pipes to seep into the water supply, causing extremely high levels of lead. Between 6,000 and 12,000 children have been exposed and they may experience a range of serious health problems. On January 21, 2016, the E.P.A. issued an emergency administrative order finding that “the city of Flint’s and the state of Michigan’s responses to the drinking water crisis in Flint have been inadequate to protect public health and that these failures continue.”

On Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join professor Peter Jacobson, professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan and professor Peter J. Henning from Wayne State University, as they take a look at the Flint water crisis, the violation of public health laws, liability, the impact on the Flint community and their health, litigation and long-term effect.

 

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/flint-water-crisis.mp3?dest-id=171194




New Rulings for Juvenile Life Sentences by the Supreme Court

Tue, 23 Feb 2016 17:23:53 +0000

On January 25, 2016, in a 6-3 opinion written by Justice Kennedy, the Supreme Court ruled that those sentenced as juveniles to mandatory life imprisonment for murder, “should have a chance to be resentenced or argue for parole.”

This ruling plays off of the 2012 decision in Miller v. Alabama, which struck down mandatory life terms without parole for juveniles. This now must be applied retroactively and could affect at least 1,000 inmates in similar situations across the country.

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi joins Emily C. Keller, a supervising attorney at Juvenile Law Center, and professor Christopher Slobogin from Vanderbilt Law School as they look at the recent Supreme Court decision, inside Montgomery v. Louisiana and Miller v. Alabama, the impact on past and future cases involving juveniles, the decision’s impact on the families of victims and juvenile justice reform.

Emily C. Keller engages in litigation and policy efforts to improve the child welfare and justice systems, including efforts to eliminate juvenile life without parole. Emily served as co-counsel for Henry Montgomery in Montgomery v. Louisiana before the U.S. Supreme Court and co-authored an amicus brief in Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2012 case banning mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles. Emily has also submitted amicus briefs in cases around the country challenging the imposition of life without parole and other extreme sentences on juvenile offenders.

Professor Christopher Slobogin occupies the Milton Underwood Chair at Vanderbilt Law School, where he directs the criminal justice program.  He has authored several books, including Juveniles at Risk: A Plea for Preventive Justice, published by Oxford University Press.

Links:

http://www.jlc.org/

http://www.jlc.org/about-us/who-we-are/staff/emily-keller

http://law.vanderbilt.edu/bio/christopher-slobogin


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/New_Rulings_for_Juvenile_Life_Sentences_by_the_Supreme_Court.mp3?dest-id=171194




President Obama’s Executive Order to Reduce Gun Violence

Fri, 22 Jan 2016 18:21:38 +0000

On January 5, 2016, President Obama announced he would be taking executive action to reduce gun violence. Surrounded by families of the Sandy Hook tragedy and other mass killings, he vowed to not allow guns to get in the wrong hands. In the past decade, more than 100,000 people have died as a result of gun violence. So, will the President’s recent action impact gun control or will all remain the same?

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi joins David B. Kopel, adjunct professor of advanced constitutional law at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and Laura Cutilletta, senior staff attorney at the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence as they take a look at this executive order on guns, “smart guns”, state laws, public reaction, and the impact this executive order could have on gun violence.

 

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/president-obama-executive-order-reduce-gun-violence.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Prosecution and Defense of Bill Cosby

Fri, 15 Jan 2016 19:25:20 +0000

When many of us think of actor and comedian Bill Cosby, we think of the jovial dad, Cliff Huxtable from the Cosby Show. Over the past year, at least 58 women have come forward alleging that Bill Cosby had drugged and sexually assaulted them at different times and in various locations.

Amidst a multitude of allegations from these women over the years, now, Bill Cosby faces criminal charges for allegedly drugging and sexual assaulting former Temple University staffer Andrea Constand back in 2004.

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi joins attorney Scott Greenfield, criminal defense attorney out of New York, and attorney Murray Newman, a former prosecutor and criminal defense attorney out of Houston as they take a look at the legal issues surrounding Bill Cosby. We will discuss the allegations, prosecution vs. defense strategy, his arrest, the recent criminal charge of sexual assault, the statute of limitations on sexual assault, the impact on his public image, and what the future holds for Mr. Cosby.

For more than 30 years, Scott Greenfield has represented clients charged with crimes or the targets of investigations in state and federal courts across the United States. Scott also writes the Simple Justice blog, a criminal defense blog.

Since graduating from the University of Houston Law Center in 1999, Murray Newman has handled criminal cases ranging from driving while intoxicated to capital murder. He served as an assistant district attorney until 2008, leaving the Harris County District Attorney's Office as a felony chief prosecutor. In private practice since 2008, Murray continues to represent clients charged with criminal offenses in the State of Texas.  In addition, Murray works as a legal consultant for the TNT television show Cold Justice and author of the well-known blog, Life at the Harris County Criminal Justice Center​.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/prosecution-defense-bill-cosby.mp3?dest-id=171194




Lawyer 2 Lawyer’s Holiday and 10th Anniversary Show

Mon, 21 Dec 2015 18:21:09 +0000

Back in 2005, Legal Talk Network created a weekly show spotlighting current legal topics.  That show became Lawyer 2 Lawyer. The masters-that-be plucked two lawyers from obscurity, one from the east, one from the west, turning them into overnight sensations.

Back then, podcasting was just starting out and eventually took the world by storm. Fast forward to 2015, and Lawyer 2 Lawyer is still going strong, reaching listeners around the globe. From the debate over the death penalty, to Steve Jobs’ impact on the legal profession, to DOMA and Prop 8 rulings, we have covered a wide range of topics and have enjoyed ourselves in the process.

So, today on Lawyer 2 Lawyer, we will visit with an old lawyer friend and musician and get in the holiday spirit, then we will take a look back at 10 years of podcasting with some special guests!

​Lawrence Savell is a New York lawyer, writer, musician, and songwriter. In 2012, after 30 years at Chadbourne & Parke, Larry moved with a number of his colleagues to form the first U.S. office of the international law firm ​Herbert Smith Freehill​s. He continues to concentrate on litigation defense and counseling.

Larry’s musical take on the legal world started with performances at the University of Michigan Law School’s “Law Revue” (alleged) talent show in the early 1980s. It continued with solo and in-house band performances at summer and holiday functions at his former law firm, where his poking good-natured fun at lawyers and the legal profession was (thankfully) well received and encouraged. Over the years he recorded many of these songs, producing vinyl records, cassette tapes, and then ‘CDs’ which he gave each holiday season to family, friends, colleagues, clients, and people he met on airplanes. You can find out more about Larry and his music at lawrencesavell.com.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/lawyer-2-lawyer-tenth-anniversary.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Paris Attacks, Terrorism, and International Law

Mon, 14 Dec 2015 17:45:17 +0000

On the evening of November 13, 2015, a series of coordinated terrorist attacks occurred in Paris, France, killing and maiming hundreds of people. Ultimately, the terror organization ISIS took responsibility for the attacks in retaliation of French airstrikes targeting ISIS on Syrian and Iraqi soil. These attacks rattled the world and put a spotlight on terrorism. So, with a complete and utter disregard for the rules of war by terror organizations, what needs to change?

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams join Dr. Lyal S. Sunga, head of the Rule of Law program at the Hague Institute for Global Justice in The Netherlands. They take a look at the recent Paris attacks, terrorism today vs. the terrorism of yesteryear, the Geneva Conventions and international law’s role, and what needs to be done legally to stay current in our fight against terrorism.

Dr. Lyal S. Sunga has conducted monitoring, investigation, reporting, technical cooperation, education and training in some 55 countries over the last 25 years in human rights, humanitarian law, and international criminal law. He is head of the Rule of Law program at the Hague Institute for Global Justice in The Netherlands and visiting professor at the Raoul Wallenberg Institute for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law in Lund, Sweden.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/paris-attacks-terrorism-international-law.mp3?dest-id=171194




Revisiting the Death Penalty Debate

Tue, 24 Nov 2015 18:31:04 +0000

Back in August of 2014, Lawyer 2 Lawyer hosted a show on the death penalty where we explored whether the death penalty was considered cruel and unusual with standout guests Judge Alex Kozinski from the United States Court of Appeals for The Ninth Circuit, exonerated death row survivor Ronald Keine from Witness to Innocence, and M*A*S*H actor Mike Farrell from Death Penalty Focus.  That episode focused on the merits of firing squads vs. lethal injections and corruption in the judicial system. Presently, the death penalty is the law in in 31 states and the debate continues.

Today on Lawyer 2 Lawyer, we revisit the death penalty debate. Host, J. Craig Williams joins attorney Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center and Judge Alex Kozinski, who sits on the bench of the United States Court of Appeals for The Ninth Circuit. Robert and Judge Kozinski take a look at the death penalty debate within our society and in our courts, exploring forensics, the fate of the death penalty, and whether we will see the constitutionality of death penalty argued before the Supreme Court.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/revisiting-death-penalty-debate.mp3?dest-id=171194




Fair Use in Authors Guild v. Google, Inc.

Fri, 13 Nov 2015 18:32:24 +0000

Ten years ago, the Authors Guild filed a lawsuit against Google, Inc. in an alleged copyright infringement case involving Google’s book scanning project. This project involved creating a searchable database that allows a user to search the content of all books that have been scanned into that database.

After many years in the courts, a federal appeals court recently ruled that the project is fully protected by fair use and does not infringe on the copyrights of authors.

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi joins Attorney William H. Frankel from Brinks Gilson & Lione, Attorney Kenneth D. Crews from Gipson Hoffman & Pancion and Attorney Jeremy S. Goldman from Frankfurt Kurnit Klein + Selz, PC. Together, they discuss the ruling in Authors Guild v. Google, Inc., explore fair use, review the case, evaluate the Authors Guild’s potential appeal and analyze how this landmark ruling will impact the book industry and the general public of readers.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/fair-use-authors-guild-google.mp3?dest-id=171194




Legalities, Legislation, and Initiatives Surrounding Sexual Assault on College Campuses

Fri, 30 Oct 2015 16:26:22 +0000

Over the years, sexual assault on college campuses has been a huge problem and Washington has taken notice through various legislation and initiatives. Between the Clery Act, pending legislation of the Campus Accountability and Safety Act (CASA) and the Safe Campus Act, and Vice President Biden and President Obama’s “It’s On Us” Campaign, there has been a call to action implementing specific guidelines that colleges and universities need to adhere to when faced with allegations of sexual assault. But it is not all black and white—so, how are colleges handling allegations? Once accused, are those students receiving due process within administrative hearings? And are the alleged victims receiving the maximum protection from colleges?

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Attorney Laura Dunn, executive director of SurvJustice and Attorney Brett A. Sokolow, the president and CEO of The NCHERM Group, as they take a look at the latest on sexual assault on college campuses, how colleges across the country are handling allegations, due process of accused students, victim protections and the importance of educating students and faculty on sexual assault.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/legalities-legislation-sexual-assault-college.mp3?dest-id=171194




Inside O'Bannon v. NCAA

Wed, 21 Oct 2015 18:59:42 +0000

Back in 2009, former UCLA basketball player Ed O'Bannon filed a lawsuit on behalf of the NCAA's Division I players. O’Bannon challenged the NCAA’s use of the images of its former student athletes for commercial purposes. Later, District Judge Claudia Wilken found for O'Bannon stating that the NCAA's rules violate antitrust laws.  However, on September 30, 2015, a three-judge panel upheld Judge Wilken's ruling, but threw out the proposal that the NCAA should pay athletes $5,000 per year in deferred compensation.

On Lawyer 2 Lawyer host, J. Craig Williams joins Attorney Swathi Bojedla from Hausfeld Law firm and Attorney Scott D. Schneider from Fisher & Phillips LLP, as they take a look at O’Bannon v. NCAA, amateurism and anti-trust laws, the appeal and how this opinion will impact future cases.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/obannon-v-ncaa.mp3?dest-id=171194




Legal Writing that Moves Gavels

Fri, 02 Oct 2015 17:43:08 +0000

J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi interview Judge Alex Kozinski from the United States Court of Appeals for The Ninth Circuit and Judge Richard Kopf from the U.S. District Court, District of Nebraska. Together, they discuss the essential elements that go into persuasive legal writing and how lawyers might be selling their clients short.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/legal-writing-moves-gavels.mp3?dest-id=171194




Robert Blagojevich’s Fight for Justice and Freedom

Fri, 18 Sep 2015 17:32:31 +0000

J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi interview Robert Blagojevich. Together they discuss they his experiences with the FBI and U.S. Attorneys Office as well as his new book “Fundraiser A: My Fight for Justice and Freedom”. Tune in to hear about his million dollar legal fight to save his name and stay out of prison.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/robert-blagojevich-fight-justice-freedom.mp3?dest-id=171194




Justified Shooting or Police Misconduct? A Year In Review After Ferguson

Fri, 04 Sep 2015 17:40:11 +0000

J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi interview Dean Erwin Chemerinsky from University of California, Irvine School of Law and Sergeant John Rivera from the Dade County Police Benevolent Association. Together they discuss the merits of using Ferguson to analyze police procedures, culpability of elected officials, and growth of murder rates around the country. In addition, they talk about attacks on police as well as the use of military equipment. Tune in hear about body cams, protests by Black Lives Matter, and the benefits of community-based policing.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/justified-shooting-police-misconduct-year-review-ferguson.mp3?dest-id=171194




Lawyers, Weed, and Money: H.R. 2076 Found Some Fans

Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:36:28 +0000

House Resolution 2076 would permit banking for marijuana businesses if they follow certain guidelines. But what does that mean for the banks and the existing federal laws? Wouldn’t they still be aiding and abetting criminal activity?

J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi interview Tom Downey from Ireland Stapleton, Professor Sam Kamin from the University of Denver, and Leonard Frieling from NORML. Together they discuss existing federal restrictions, criminal penalties, and how H.R. 2076 might change the landscape. Tune in to hear about the Supremacy Clause, money laundering, and much more.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/lawyers-weed-money.mp3?dest-id=171194




Uber vs. Taxi: The Sharing Economy’s Power over Workers and Liability

Fri, 14 Aug 2015 18:53:23 +0000

Despite its popularity, not everyone is so enamored with Uber. Recently, it has fallen under scrutiny for its utilization of independent contractors and been accused of violating local regulations for taxi services. Perhaps the most visible challengers to Uber’s ride sharing service are the taxicab companies and unions who are crying fowl in major metropolitan areas. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi discusses these issues and more with guests Jonathan Handel from University of Southern California and Matthew Feeney from the Cato Institute. Tune in to hear about categories for workers and liability for accidents in the new sharing economy.

Special thanks to our sponsor Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/uber-taxi-workers-liability.mp3?dest-id=171194




Supreme Court of the United States: 2015 Session in Review

Sat, 25 Jul 2015 00:55:56 +0000

J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi discuss the latest Supreme Court decisions with Tony Mauro from the National Law Journal and Tejinder Singh from SCOTUSBlog. Together they review the fundamental rights in Obergefell v. Hodges, interpretation of legislation under King v. Burwell, and free speech in Walker v. Sons of Confederate Veterans. Tune in to hear a detailed analysis of decisions as well as predictions for the future. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/supreme-court-united-states-2015-review.mp3?dest-id=171194




Orange County’s Jailhouse Informant Program

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 19:31:32 +0000

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, producer Laurence Colletti interviews Professor Alexandra Natapoff from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles and Rudolph Loewenstein, a recommendation directly from the Orange County Public Defenders Office. Together they discuss the constitutionality of Orange County’s Jailhouse Informant Program, why there’s such uproar in its use, and why Texas might be turning away from such practices in death penalty cases. Tune in to hear about the “papering” of Judge Thomas M. Goethals and likely punishments for alleged abuses of the system.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/orange-county-jailhouse-informant-program.mp3?dest-id=171194




‘FOSS+beer’ at Beryl’s Beer Co.

Thu, 21 May 2015 18:47:06 +0000

During a recent trip, Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi visited Legal Talk Network headquarters in Denver, Colorado. While there, he interviewed hosts from another legal podcast called ‘FOSS+beer’. With their general focus on law, technology, and open source software, hosts Mark Donald, Jilayne Lovejoy, and the mysterious Boups the Beerman navigate potentially irreverent topics while sampling local libations on each episode. In an effort to respond in kind, we decided to adjourn from our comfy studio in favor of our neighbor’s craft brewery establishment, Beryl’s Beer Co.

Tune in to hear this spirited discussion about the indemnification, intellectual property, and ethical issues associated with open source software and the practice of law. In addition, listen to our very own Trent Carlyle, owner and chief technology officer of Legal Talk Network, and Chad Jolly, senior software developer, as they join the conversation and talk about the world of modern software development while Eric Nichols, head brewer from Beryl’s Beer Co., gives the rundown on the craft brewery industry sweeping the RiNo arts district in downtown Denver.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/lawyer-2-lawyer-foss-beer.mp3?dest-id=171194




Mandatory Vaccines vs. Individual Rights

Fri, 01 May 2015 18:54:37 +0000

Credited with saving millions of lives per year, few health programs can boast the success of vaccinations. Even for those who, for health reasons, can’t be inoculated, vaccines provide a type of community immunity by preventing dangerous outbreaks in densely populated areas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention call vaccinations the greatest public health achievement in 100 years. But does that mean we should make vaccines mandatory? In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Drew Trimble, John Tocci, and Jeremy Byellin. Together they discuss federal authority and the police power of the states when it comes mandatory vaccinations and quarantine. Tune in to hear what exemptions exist for citizens opposed or unable to comply.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/mandatory-vaccines-individual-rights.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Legal Ethics and Morality of 'Better Call Saul'

Fri, 17 Apr 2015 17:58:02 +0000

His name is James McGill, but most of us know him as Slipping Jimmy, or Saul Goodman, an ethically conflicted advocate for the unlawful. Making his debut in season two of 'Breaking Bad', actor Bob Odenkirk brought life to his loveably shady character, providing comedic relief in an otherwise dark show. Today, Saul Goodman returns to fans in a spin off show titled 'Better Call Saul' which is set in 2002, long before he meets Walter White and Jesse Pinkman. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Nicole Hyland author of The Legal Ethics of Better Call Saul blog. Together they discuss the ethical blunders of Saul Goodman, why he’s so likeable, and whether or not he’s a good person. Tune in to hear how Saul’s questionable antics stack up against real life rules of professional conduct and how what’s technically legal isn’t always what’s right. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/legal-ethics-morality-better-call-saul.mp3?dest-id=171194




Ellen Pao v. Kleiner Perkins: A Discussion about Gender Equality in Law

Fri, 03 Apr 2015 18:35:24 +0000

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts J. Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi interview Laurel Bellows, former president of the American Bar Association, Renwei Chung, featured columnist and contributor to Above the Law, and Professor Melissa Hart from the University of Colorado Law School. Together they discuss why they believe Ellen Pao (now interim CEO for reddit) was a victim of gender discrimination and how the legal industry is still affected by gender bias. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/ellen-pao-kleiner-perkins-gender-equality-law.mp3?dest-id=171194




Driving While Intoxicated: Prescription Drugs, Recliners, Wheels, and Hooves

Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:17:30 +0000

We all know that drinking and driving is a serious and dangerous offense. But it may surprise you that drivers are being charged with DWI for taking prescription drugs while riding bicycles, horses, and yes Segways. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Douglas Kans and Robert Ambrose from the Kans Law Firm. Together they discuss the disparate treatment of controlled substances, your rights while being charged with an offense, and modes of transportation to stay away from while intoxicated. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/driving-while-intoxicated.mp3?dest-id=171194




Same Sex Marriage: Civil Right or State Right?

Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:38:55 +0000

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Harry Mihet from Liberty Counsel, Elliot Mincberg from People For the American Way, and Professor Ronald Krotoszynski from the University of Alabama School of Law. Together they debate the duties of Alabama’s probate judges and the enforcement of existing same sex marriage licenses. Is same sex marriage a civil right? Who will win the tug-of-war between federal oversight and self governing states? Tune in to hear about this landmark issue and more. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/same-sex-marriage-civil-state.mp3?dest-id=171194




Driverless Cars: Who’s “Driving” and Who’s Responsible?

Fri, 20 Feb 2015 20:02:53 +0000

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews attorney and author of Robots Are People Too John Weaver, researcher and writer for Michigan Auto Law Todd Berg, and litigator and author of Motorista Anna Eby. Together they discuss liability for passengers, possible federal regulations, and risks associated with vehicle hacks. In addition, they debate when the government might pilot your driverless car, how medical emergencies in autonomous vehicles will be handled, and the possibility of the repo man summoning your automobile. Tune in to hear about existing driverless car laws and much much more!


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/driverless-cars.mp3?dest-id=171194




Breaking Down The Serial Podcast: Attorneys Dissect Adnan Syed's Case

Fri, 13 Feb 2015 21:15:08 +0000

On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams discuss Serial and the case it made famous with three attorneys: Director of Investigation for University of Virginia School of Law's Innocence Project Clinic Deirdre Enright, featured on episodes 7 and 12 of Serial and currently working on Adnan's appeal, Erica Zunkel from the Federal Criminal Justice Clinic at the University of Chicago Law School, and Markus Kypreos from the Fort Worth civil litigation firm Pennington Hill. Together, they analyze the case against Adnan from both sides, offering expert insight on criminal defense and prosecution, the testimony of Jay Wilds, and the portrayal of this case on Serial, all while tackling some of the tougher questions raised regarding DNA evidence, potential alibis, shaky timelines, and the overall defense strategy.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/attorneys-dissect-serial-podcast.mp3?dest-id=171194




Soto v. Bushmaster

Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:45:00 +0000

In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Elliot Fineman from the National Gun Victims Action Council, Charles Heller from Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership, and Professor Nicholas Johnson from Fordham University School of Law. Together they discuss the merits of this case, the Second Amendment, and the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Tune in to hear outcome predictions as well as debates regarding self-defense and gun control. Where do you stand on the ownership of firearms and how responsible should companies be for the actions of others?


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/soto-bushmaster-firearms.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Senate Committee Study of the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program

Fri, 09 Jan 2015 20:03:09 +0000

In December 2014, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence released its study on the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program. Among the many infractions alleged were unlawful torture, coverups, wrongful detention, and unauthorized dissemination of classified information. Since its release, there have been many critics of that report including the Senate Republican Minority, former Vice-President Dick Cheney, the CIA, and its former directors. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Guantanamo Bay (GTMO) attorney Professor Mark Denbeaux, Project 21 Chair Horace Cooper, and Cato Institute Policy Analyst Patrick Eddington. Together, they discuss the legalities of enhanced interrogation, whether or not it's effective, and the morality of its use in the theatre of war.

Professor Mark P. Denbeaux is the director of the Seton Hall Law School Center for Policy and Research, which is best known for its distribution of the internationally recognized series of reports on the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp. Professor Denbeaux's interest in the conditions of detainment arose during his representation of multiple detainees including Abu Zubaydah, who was held in a CIA dark site, as well as two Tunisian detainees from GTMO.

Horace Cooper is co-chairman for Project 21's National Advisory Board and adjunct fellow with the National Center for Public Policy Research. In addition to having taught constitutional law at George Mason University, Mr. Cooper was general counsel to U.S. House Majority Leader Dick Armey.

Patrick Eddington is a policy analyst in Homeland Security and Civil Liberties at the Cato Institute. A former senior policy advisor to U.S. Representative Rush Holt from New Jersey, Mr. Eddington's legislative portfolio includes security, intelligence, and detainee interrogation issues.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/The_Senate_Committee_Study_of_the_CIAs_Detention_and_Interrogation_Program.mp3?dest-id=171194




Animals’ Writ of Habeas Corpus: Autonomy, Self Determination, and Chimpanzees

Fri, 26 Dec 2014 18:45:00 +0000

On December 2, 2013, the first ever lawsuit on behalf of captive chimpanzees was filed in the New York Supreme Court. The objective of that lawsuit was to grant Tommy (a chimpanzee) bodily freedom through a common law writ of habeas corpus. Since then, two similar lawsuits have been filed. Leading the charge in all three actions is world-renowned animal rights lawyer Steven M. Wise from the Nonhuman Rights Project. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams welcomes back Mr. Wise to discuss the legal theories behind his cases as well as other animals that could potentially benefit. Tune in to hear why Steven is not deterred by the recent loss in Tommy's appeal and the difference between legal personhood and being human.

To hear more from Steven M. Wise on this topic, please listen to "Should a Chimpanzee Have Human Rights?" which was recorded before Tommy's case was filed.

Steven M. Wise is the president of the Nonhuman Rights Project and has been practicing animal protection law nationwide for 30 years. He currently teaches Animal Rights Jurisprudence at Lewis and Clark, University of Miami, and St. Thomas Law Schools and has previously taught Animal Rights Law at the Harvard and John Marshall Law Schools. Wise has published four books on animal rights, including Rattling the Cage - Toward Legal Rights for Animals, and is currently heading three simultaneous lawsuits in the State of New York to free Chimpanzees.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Animals_Writ_of_Habeas_Corpus_Autonomy_Self_Determination_and_Chimpanzees.mp3?dest-id=171194




Senators Weigh In on Immigration, The Constitution, and Obama's Executive Order

Fri, 12 Dec 2014 18:30:00 +0000

On November 20, President Obama announced his intention to execute an Executive Order potentially offering deferred deportation for nearly five million illegal immigrants. Since that time, opposing forces have challenged the constitutionality of such actions. Perhaps the most significant challenge is a federal lawsuit filed by nearly 20 states. In it, they allege violations of Article 2 Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution as well as the Administrative Procedure Act. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews former United States Senator Byron Dorgan and current New Mexico State Senator Steven Neville. Also participating by pre-recorded interview is current Texas State Senator Jose Rodriguez. Together, they discuss the constitutionality of President Obama's recent actions on immigration as well as the viability of the federal suit filed by the various states. Tune in to hear opposing views on the separation of families, burdens on the social welfare system, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. If you find this topic interesting, you may also want to listen to an earlier show about unaccompanied minor immigrants titled "Unaccompanied Minor Immigrants: Push and Pull Factors of Immigration." Former US Senator Byron L. Dorgan served as a Congressman and Senator for North Dakota for 30 years before retiring from the U.S. Senate in 2011. He served in the Senate Leadership for 16 years and was Chairman of Senate Committees and Subcommittees on the issues of Energy, Aviation, Appropriations, Water Policy, and Indian Affairs. Today, Senator Dorgan is a senior policy advisor at Arent Fox where he co-chairs the firm's government relations practice. In addition, he is a visiting professor at Georgetown University lecturing on energy and environmental issues as well as a Senior Fellow with the Bipartisan Policy Center, a think tank in Washington DC. New Mexico State Senator Steven Neville is currently serving District 2 and has been in the New Mexico State Senate since 2004. Prior to that he served as County Commissioner in San Juan County from 1997 to 2004, the City Commission of the City of Aztec from 1995-1996, and County Chairman for the San Juan Republican Party from 1990-1991. Senator Neville has been self-employed with his own company, N-Vest, Inc., a real estate consulting and investment organization since 1985. Texas State Senator Jose Rodriguez represents District 29 which includes the counties of El Paso, Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, and Presidio. He represents both urban and rural constituencies, and more than 350 miles of the Texas-Mexico border. Senator Rodriguez currently serves as the Chairman of the Senate Hispanic Caucus, Vice Chairman of the Senate Jurisprudence Committee, and a member of the Senate Committees on Criminal Justice, Veteran Affairs and Military Installations, and Government Organization. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.[...]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Senators_Weigh_In_on_Immigration_The_Constitution_and_Obamas_Executive_Order.mp3?dest-id=171194




Net Neutrality

Fri, 28 Nov 2014 19:00:00 +0000

On the coattails of presidential support and possible regulations from the Federal Communications Commission, Net Neutrality makes its way back into public debate. Proponents claim it will keep the internet a level playing field while opponents believe the opposite. One side worries about oppressive corporations while the other is concerned about oppressive government. Not surprisingly, opinions for or against tend to follow political party lines. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Chris Fedeli from Judicial Watch and Professor Jonathan Askin from Brooklyn Law School. Together they discuss the meaning of net neutrality, the pros and cons of regulating, and what it takes to keep the internet innovative. Tune in to hear about free market principles, consumer protection, and data packet discrimination.

Chris Fedeli is a senior attorney with Judicial Watch where he has litigated multiple cases in state and federal courts concerning election integrity, ballot initiatives and referendums, and government transparency. Prior to joining Judicial Watch, Fedeli was a senior associate at Davis Wright Tremaine in Washington D.C., where he represented clients in communications law litigation and regulatory proceedings. In 2009, the ABA's Communications Lawyer published Fedeli's article criticizing the FCC for its net neutrality regulations, which have since been overturned twice by the DC Circuit.

Professor Jonathan Askin is a professor at Brooklyn Law School where he teaches technology, telecommunications, and entrepreneurial law and policy. He is also the Founder of the Brooklyn Law Incubator and Policy Clinic, which represents internet, new media, communications and other tech entrepreneurs on business development, policy advocacy, and law reform. During the 2008 Presidential Election, Askin chaired the Internet Governance Working Group for the 2008 Obama Presidential Campaign.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Net_Neutrality.mp3?dest-id=171194




Quarantine and Isolation: How Federal and State Powers Fight Ebola

Fri, 14 Nov 2014 19:15:13 +0000

Federal and State governing authorities have the power to quarantine an individual under the suspicion that person has Ebola and could possibly spread it to others. But what if the government is wrong? Is there redress for people held against their will? It might surprise you that your civil liberties can be subjugated for the common good. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Gary Phelan from Mitchell and Sheahan, P.C. and Professor John Thomas from Quinnipiac University School of Law. Together they discuss balancing tests that allow both Federal and State governments to quarantine individuals as well the possible criminal and tort liabilities for people who knowingly, recklessly, or through negligence infect others. Tune in to hear more about the power given to the Executive Branch, Governmental Immunity from suit, and International Health Regulations from the World Health Organization.

Gary Phelan is a shareholder at Mitchell and Sheahan, P.C. where he represents employees and employers in a wide range of matters, including disability and age discrimination, family responsibilities discrimination, wrongful termination, and severance negotiations. Mr. Phelan was recently the attorney for a Connecticut family whose little girl was not allowed to attend school for fear that she had been exposed to Ebola during her trip to a family wedding in Nigeria. The case received nationwide attention.

Professor John Thomas of Quinnipiac University School of Law teaches health law and intellectual property. He has been published over 170 times on topics such as gun violence, health policy, politics, autism, juvenile justice, and music. In addition, he has spoken on health law topics across the U.S. and internationally. Thomas is a freelance writer and guitar player with a recent literary work titled "Kalamazoo Gals: A Story of the Extraordinary Women and Gibson's "Banner" Guitars of WWII."

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Quarantine_and_Isolation_How_Federal_and_State_Powers_Fight_Ebola.mp3?dest-id=171194




Anniversary Show: Welcoming Our Tenth Year

Fri, 31 Oct 2014 18:26:56 +0000

Having started their tenth year in podcasting, Lawyer 2 Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams take time to reflect upon on past shows, guests, and favorite moments. In an exchange of roles, Bob and Craig are interviewed by their very first guest, Michael S. Greco from K and L Gates LLP, who was the President of the American Bar Association and originally joined the show to talk about his initiatives. Tune in to hear about how our hosts got started in law, who wins "Name That Guest," favorite shows of 2014, as well as bloopers and theme songs. Thank you to all of our listeners over the years. We hope you enjoy this episode.

Michael S. Greco is currently Of-counsel at K and L Gates LLP an international law firm that's 2,000 attorneys strong and represents large business interests. He is a commercial litigator, arbitrator, mediator, and appellate lawyer with more than 40 years of experience in resolving complex business issues and other disputes throughout the United States and internationally. In addition, Mr. Greco is a former President of the American Bar Association.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Anniversary_Show_Welcoming_Our_Tenth_Year_V2.mp3?dest-id=171194




Wrongfully Convicted: William Dillon and His Life in Prison

Fri, 17 Oct 2014 21:09:15 +0000

Imagine being 20 years old and being investigated for a murder you didn't commit. Would you know what to say or do? Failure to react correctly could cost you a lifetime in prison. Sound far-fetched? It might surprise you to learn that it happens more often than we think, and for somewhat predictable reasons. In this special edition of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews William Michael Dillon, a man who spent nearly 30 years behind bars in one of the country's most dangerous prisons for a crime he did not commit, and Seth Miller, one of the attorneys who helped overturn his conviction. Tune in to hear how false confessions, eyewitness misidentification, and corrupt jail-house snitches are costing innocent people their freedom, and learn why William isn't angry today and how finding a voice through writing music helped him find hope.

William Dillon served 27 years and 8 months of a life sentence for a murder he did not commit. The State of Florida released him in 2008 when DNA testing proved he was not linked to a key piece of evidence used to convict him. He is a singer and songwriter whose work was inspired by his long incarceration in Florida State Prison. Today, he advocates for organizations, including the Innocence Project of Florida, that were instrumental in setting him free.

Seth Miller is one of the attorneys who helped exonerate William Dillon. He works for the Innocence Project of Florida where he has dedicated himself to exonerating the innocent since 2006. His organization receives nearly 2,000 requests to review convictions per year. Mr. Miller's focus is on post-conviction cases that have DNA in evidence.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


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The Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame: Rainmakers Who Ran the Gauntlet

Fri, 03 Oct 2014 23:28:30 +0000

Famed legal writer John Grisham calls them Rainmakers. We've celebrated their legendary victories in cinematic works such as "A Civil Action" and "Erin Brockovich." In Hollywood, these plaintiffs attorneys are often portrayed as Davids to their opposing Goliaths of corrupt industry. But who are they in real life? In this special edition of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview titans of the courtroom Mike Papantonio, Howard Nations, Thomas Girardi, and Fred Levin. In the first segment of this show, they reveal their most respected defense counsel, discuss the traits of successful trial attorneys, as well as evaluate the contingency fee model. In the second segment, Bob and Craig interview Fred Levin about his new biography which covers his very colorful life and career. Tune in to hear about his victories and his defeats. Mike Papantonio was instrumental in the creation of The Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. In addition to being a senior partner at Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell, Rafferty and Proctor, Mike co-hosts his nationally syndicated talk show (Ring of Fire) with esteemed co-hosts Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and Sam Seder. Mr. Papantonio is also nationally known for his success in mass tort litigation, recipient of multiple prestigious awards (like Trial Lawyer of the Year and the Perry Nichols), and accomplished author of several motivational books for lawyers. Howard Nations is an inductee at The Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame whose national practice is currently working on litigation for Actos bladder cancer, defective hip implants, transvaginal mesh, Pradaxa, and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. As a pioneer in courtroom technology, Howard was the first attorney to have computer-generated liability and medical animations admitted into evidence at trial. Among his many awards, he is the recipient of the W. McKinley Smiley, Jr., Lighthouse Award; the Belli Society's Mel Award; and MTMP's Clarence Darrow Award. Thomas Girardi is an inductee at The Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame who's commonly known for his work in Anderson v. Pacific Gas and Electric (the case made famous by the Erin Brockovich film). Among his numerous headlines, Mr. Girardi secured a 4.85 billion dollar settlement from Merck for Vioxx, a 785 million dollar verdict from Lockheed for personal injuries, and a 1.7 billion dollar settlement from the State of California for manipulating natural gas prices. Fred Levin is commonly referred to as the man who brought down Big Tobacco by helping to secure the largest settlement in US history. To date, he has won over 100 jury verdicts and settlements worth at least one million dollars. During his very colorful career he represented heavyweight boxing champion Roy Jones Jr., helped start the national firm of Johnnie Cochran, be-friended multiple Preside[...]


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Fighting for Fifteen: Does Increasing the Minimum Wage Help the Economy?

Fri, 19 Sep 2014 20:15:17 +0000

Worker groups around the country are demonstrating for the purpose of increasing the minimum wage while experts and policy makers debate the effect of such change. Proponents say a higher minimum wage helps low-skilled workers and boosts the economy. Opponents say increasing the minimum wage decreases employment and raises the cost of living. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Dr. Antony Davies from George Mason University and Dr. David Madland from American Progress. Together they discuss discuss economic and social principles associated with the minimum wage as well as who ultimately ends up paying for it. Tune in to learn more about the effects on fixed incomes, morale of workers, and quality of work.

Dr. Antony Davies is an associate professor of economics at Duquesne University and a Mercatus Affiliated Senior Scholar at George Mason University. His primary research interests include econometrics and public policy. Davies has authored over 100 op-eds in over thirty newspapers including the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, New York Daily News, and Philadelphia Inquirer.

Dr. David Madland is the Director of the American Worker Project and the Managing Director of the Economic Policy team at American Progress. He has written extensively about the economy and American politics on a range of topics including retirement policy, labor unions, and the minimum wage. Madland has appeared on the the PBS News Hour and CNN's Crossfire. He has been cited in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post as well as been a guest on dozens of radio talk shows across the United States. David worked for Rep. George Miller (from California) and has testified before Congress and state legislatures.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


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Lawful Arrest or Excessive Use of Force: Today’s Perceptions about Militarized Police

Fri, 05 Sep 2014 22:50:51 +0000

In recent news, there have been several instances of demonstrations and riots resulting from allegations of police brutality. In cities like New York and Ferguson, there are many accounts and view points but there is still much to debate about the facts. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi interviews Amy Goodman from Democracy Now! and Sgt. Delroy Burton from DC Police Union. Together they discuss the perceptions and procedures of police as they use force to make arrests. Tune in to hear about why citizens shouldn't resist arrests as well as opinions about the use of military equipment for police work.

Amy Goodman is the host and executive producer of the award winning show Democracy Now! which airs on over 1,200 public television and radio stations worldwide. In addition, she has authored many best selling books including The Silenced Majority: Stories of Uprisings, Occupations, Resistance, and Hope. Ms. Goodman is the recipient of many prestigious awards such as the Right Livelihood Award, James Aronson Award for Social Justice Reporting, and many many more.

Sgt. Delroy Burton is the Chairman for DC Police Union and has been a police officer since August 1994. He worked many patrol assignments that required specialized training including alcohol enforcement, pulse Doppler radar, and police motorcycles. Sergeant Burton worked as a vice investigator prior to becoming detective and later became sergeant. He began working for DC Police Union in 2006 and was elected union chairman in 2013 with his term beginning in April of 2014.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


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Firing Squads and Lethal Injections: Is Today’s Death Penalty Cruel and Unusual?

Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:32:49 +0000

The Eighth Amendment protects people from cruel and unusual punishments in the United States but what does that mean? In the last 38 years, Americans used hangings, gas chambers, lethal injections, electrocutions, and firing squads to execute convicted murderers. Given the recent reports of botched lethal injections, some experts are calling for the return of the firing squad as the most humane form of capital punishment. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Judge Alex Kozinski from the United States Court of Appeals for The Ninth Circuit, exonerated death row survivor Ronald Keine from Witness to Innocence, and M*A*S*H actor Mike Farrell from Death Penalty Focus. Together they discuss the merits of firing squads vs. lethal injections, corruption in the judicial system, and the morality of western society. Tune in to hear about the 144 exonerated death row survivors as well as Ronald Keine's near miss with the gas chamber.

Judge Alex Kozinski sits on the bench of the United States Court of Appeals for The Ninth Circuit where he's served since his appointment on November 7th 1985. Prior to his appointment Judge Kozinski occupied other prestigious positions including Chief Judge of the US Claims Court and Office of Counsel to the President. He is married with three children plus three grandchildren.

Ronald Keine is an exonerated death row inmate who was just 9 days from his execution in the gas chamber when the actual murderer confessed to the crime. Today, he an Assistant Director of Membership and Training for Witness to Innocence an anti-death penalty organization whose leading voice is that of exonerated death row survivors.

Mike Farrell played Captain BJ Hunnicut for eight years on the hit television show M*A*S*H as well other roles like Jim Hansen in another series called Providence. In the 90s, he served for three years as a member of the State of California's Commission on Judicial Performance. Mr. Farrell is a life-long opponent of the death penalty and has been the President of Death Penalty Focus since 1994.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


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Marijuana Use During Pregnancy and Child Abuse

Fri, 08 Aug 2014 19:41:50 +0000

Although still illegal everywhere in the United States under federal law, Colorado and Washington have decided not to prosecute marijuana use or production at the state level. Despite this lack of enforcement, women who use marijuana during their pregnancies are being charged with child abuse shortly after giving birth. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Sabrina Fendrick from the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and Carla Lowe from Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana. Together they discuss conflicting studies and beliefs regarding the benefits, harms, and prohibition of marijuana. Tune in to learn more about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome as well as the differences between THC, tobacco, and alcohol for pregnant women.

Sabrina Fendrick currently serves as the Director of Strategic Partnerships for NORML the Washington DC-based National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. In 2010, she founded the NORML Women's Alliance and served as Director of Women's Outreach to develop multiple female-focused awareness campaigns to educate women, and empower them to speak out on behalf of progressive cannabis policies. Today Fendrick remains dedicated to increasing women's involvement throughout all aspects of the legalization movement, including parenting and child custody issues.

Carla Lowe is the founder of Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana (CALM). She has been a volunteer anti-drug activist since 1977. Carla co-founded Californians for Drug-Free Youth and Californians for Drug-Free Schools. In addition, she chaired the Nancy Reagan Speakers' Bureau of the National Federation of Parents for Drug-Free Youth. Lowe is a mother of five grown children, grandmother of nine, and former high-school teacher.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


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The New Pregnancy Drug Law in Tennessee

Fri, 25 Jul 2014 20:23:38 +0000

On July 1st a new law took effect in Tennessee that allows prosecutors to pursue criminal assault charges if the mother uses illegal drugs during pregnancy. Although it had widespread bipartisan support and is designed to fight Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, some believe it to be an unconstitutional infraction on privacy, equal protection, and due process. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Tennessee House Representative Mike Carter and Legal Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee Thomas Castelli. Together they discuss maximum penalties, the law's effect on demographics, and treatment based defenses to punishment. Tune in to hear why the Tennessee General Assembly believes this law is their only option and the reasons the ACLU is fighting it.

Thomas H. Castelli is the Legal Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee. Prior to joining the ACLU, he provided litigation counsel to businesses and law firms with Counsel on Call and was a founding partner with Castelli and Knox, LLP, a small general practice firm with an emphasis on employment discrimination and wrongful discharge. He also worked as an associate at Schulten, Ward and Turner, LLP as well as Sutherland, Asbill and Brennan, LLP, where he focused on employment, construction, bankruptcy and general business litigation. He is a native Tennessean who grew up in Murfreesboro.

The Honorable Mike Carter is a House Representative in the Tennessee General Assembly. He is a life-long resident of Ooltewah, Tennessee and practiced law for twenty years before being appointed as Judge, now retired, in 1997 by then Governor Don Sundquist. In 2009, Mr. Carter served as Special Assistant to then County Mayor Claude Ramsey. In 2012, he ran unopposed as a State Representative to serve the people of the newly created 29th District of Tennessee. Carter serves on the House Civil Justice Committee, House Finance Ways and Means Committee, and the House Ethics Committee. He also serves on TACIR (Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations) and the House Judicial Oversight Panel.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Burwell v. Hobby Lobby: Religion, Contraception, and Regulation

Fri, 11 Jul 2014 19:33:39 +0000

The Supreme Court's recent decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby invokes passionate debates and fiery discourse. At the spearhead of exchange are questions about reproductive, First Amendment, and healthcare rights. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi brings light to these issues along with Emily Martin from the National Women's Law Center and Elizabeth Slattery from the Heritage Foundation. Together they discuss the application of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act vs. invoking a Constitutional argument centered around the First Amendment. Tune in to learn more about the 4 debated methods of contraception, Justice Ginsburg's dissent, and religious rights of corporations.

Emily Martin is the Vice President and General Counsel at the National Women's Law Center, where she undertakes cross-cutting projects addressing women's health, economic security, and education and employment opportunities. Prior to joining the Center, Ms. Martin served as Deputy Director of the Women's Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union and served as a law clerk for Senior Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Judge T.S. Ellis, III, of the Eastern District of Virginia. She has served as Vice President and President of the Fair Housing Justice Center, a non-profit organization in New York City.

Elizabeth Slattery is a senior legal policy analyst in The Heritage Foundation's Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies. She researches a variety of issues such as the rule of law, the First Amendment, civil rights and equal protection, and the scope of constitutional provisions. Ms. Slattery also studies and writes about cases before the Supreme Court, judicial nominations, and the proper role of the courts. She manages the Meese Center's appellate advocacy programs, including moot court sessions to prepare litigators for oral argument before the Supreme Court. Ms. Slattery's analysis and commentary have appeared in The Washington Times and The Washington Examiner, as well as outlets including National Review Online, The Daily Signal, The Daily Caller and U.S. News and World Report.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Unaccompanied Minor Immigrants: Push and Pull Factors of Immigration

Mon, 30 Jun 2014 22:37:56 +0000

Since 2009, the number of unaccompanied minors apprehended crossing the U.S. border has sharply increased. The journey for these children is long, expensive, and dangerous. What is the cause of this sudden influx of young immigrants? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Alex Nowrasteh from the Cato Institute and Elizabeth Dallam from Kids in Need of Defense (otherwise known as KIND). Together they discuss the immigration numbers, reasons for seeking asylum, and suggested policy changes. Tune in to learn how immigration is affected by Central American gangs and the War on Drugs.

Alex Nowrasteh is the immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute's Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity. Previously he was the immigration policy analyst at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Among many publications, his work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Houston Chronicle, and Boston Globe. He has appeared on Fox News and numerous television and radio stations across the United States. He received his B.A. in Economics from George Mason University and Masters in Economic History from the London School of Economics.

Elizabeth Dallam is the National Legal Services Director at Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) which is a program providing pro bono legal services to children who arrive "unaccompanied" or alone to the United States. Previously, she served as the Senior Protection Officer at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Washington, DC. During her tenure at that organization, she acted as the agency's focal point on unaccompanied children and advocated for systemic reforms in law and policy to better protect children. Prior to that, Elizabeth was the Executive Director of the Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project in Arizona, where she started a children's representation project.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Facial Recognition Technology: Security vs. Privacy Concerns

Tue, 17 Jun 2014 22:34:51 +0000

Imagine a computer thousands of miles away recognizing you in a camera at an intersection. Furthermore, consider being tracked and monitored from your home to your place of work every day. Facial recognition technology makes this type of identification possible and it is being rapidly developed for country defense and law enforcement purposes. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Ed Tivol from EWA, Government Systems, Inc. and Jennifer Lynch from Electronic Frontier Foundation. Together, they discuss the paradox of security vs. privacy when it comes to biometric modes of identification. In addition, they deliberate on how this data is being collected, who is collecting it, and for what purpose. Tune in to hear about your evolving First and Fourth Amendment Rights in the face of national security, crime prevention, and the private sector.

Jennifer Lynch is a Senior Staff Attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on open government, transparency, and privacy issues as part of EFF's Transparency Project. She is a writer and frequent speaker on government surveillance programs, domestic drones, intelligence community misconduct, and biometrics. Lynch has testified about facial recognition before Senate Subcommittees and prior to joining EFF, she was the Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Samuelson Law, Technology and Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law.

Ed Tivol is the Vice President of the Intelligence and Operations Division for EWA, Government Systems, Inc. a defense contractor actively developing facial recognition technology for the Federal Government. He is a 1964 graduate of The Citadel and served in the Army's Military Intelligence branch for 24 years. Tivol completed two tours in Vietnam and retired with the rank of Colonel in 1990. In the same year, he began his work with EWA and has been there ever since. Ed holds master's degrees from University of Maryland and the Army War College. Today Mr. Tivol and his wife raise racehorses and Angus cattle outside of Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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60 Years After Brown v. Board of Education, Equal Educational Access Remains Elusive

Tue, 03 Jun 2014 17:44:24 +0000

May 17th, 2014 marked the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court Decision that held state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students as unconstitutional because they violate the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. Today, some six decades later, many parents and teachers are still worried that America's children are not receiving equal access to education envisioned in that case. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams shed light on this issue with guests Christian D'Andrea from the MacIver Institute and Kyle Serrette from The Center for Popular Democracy. Together they discuss private schools, charter schools, and homeschooling vs. the community school model. Tune in to learn more about funding concerns, oversight issues, and the proper role of teachers unions in the school choice debate.

Christian D'Andrea is an Education Policy Analyst with the John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy in Madison, WI. He earned his Master's of Public Policy degree at Vanderbilt University and has previously worked for the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice as a State Policy Director and Policy Analyst. He is the author of several studies that examine the fiscal and personal impacts of educational reform, and his work has been featured everywhere from the Huffington Post to EducationNext.

Kyle Serrette is the Director of Education Justice Campaigns at The Center for Popular Democracy and works with their partner organizations to strengthen their public education coalitions, develop strategy to help close the opportunity gaps, and coordinates national and regional campaigns that work to bolster our public education system. Prior to joining The Center for Popular Democracy, Kyle spent over 10 years working on corporate campaigns with groups such as Service Employees International Union, Change to Win, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. He was awarded the 2010 Joe Hill Organizing Achievement Award by the LA Fed and the Los Angeles Orange County Organize Committee.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Greece v. Galloway: Prayer in Government Assemblies

Tue, 20 May 2014 16:42:02 +0000

On May 5th 2014, the Supreme Court decided Greece v. Galloway, a landmark case about the right of prayer in government assemblies. Both sides of the argument invoked the First Amendment to make their case, but who is right and why? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi brings this issue to the forefront with opposing counsels Douglas Laycock, for the respondents, and David Cortman, for the petitioner. Together, they discuss the relative merits of their cases, the endorsement test, and the coercion test. Tune in to hear more about the future of legislative prayer and your First Amendment rights.

Professor Douglas Laycock is a Robert E. Scott Distinguished Professor of Law Professor of Religious Studies at University of Virginia School of Law and one of the nation's leading authorities on the law of religious liberty. In addition to teaching for over 30 years, Professor Laycock has testified frequently before Congress and has argued many cases in the courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Laycock is an accomplished author on the subject at hand and the 2nd Vice President of the American Law Institute. Especially pertinent to today's episode, Professor Laycock argued for Susan Galloway and Linda Stephens, the respondents, in the Supreme Court.

David Cortman serves as senior counsel and vice-president of Religious Liberty with Alliance Defending Freedom at its Atlanta Regional Service Center in Georgia. He also heads litigation efforts to defend and reclaim the First Amendment rights of public school students across the country. Among his many media appearances, Mr. Cortman has been on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News. Especially pertinent to today's episode, he served as counsel for the Town of Greece, the petitioner, in the Supreme Court.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Bryan Garner on the Latest Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary

Mon, 05 May 2014 21:04:28 +0000

Due out this week is the 10th edition of Black's Law Dictionary. With 16,000 new definitions, 900 new maxims, and terms dated back to their first English usage, Black's Law Dictionary 10th Edition is touted to be the most comprehensive and relevant collection of legal terminology to date. But what goes into making this legal reference and how does it stay relevant in today's world? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Black's Law Dictionary's editor-in-chief Professor Bryan A. Garner. Together they discuss the army of 300 professionals and scholars who deciphered true meanings from historic documents, ancient language, and modern usage. Tune in to hear Garner describe what goes into updating Black's and why he believes attorneys will continue to use it for generations to come.

Bryan A. Garner is a U.S. lawyer, lexicographer, and teacher who has written several books about English usage and style, including Garner's Modern American Usage and Elements of Legal Style. He has served as editor-in-chief of Black's Law Dictionary since 1995, and coauthored two books with Justice Antonin Scalia: Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges, and Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts. Professor Garner is a prolific lecturer, having taught more than 2,500 writing workshops since the 1991 founding of his company, LawProse, Inc., and he is a distinguished Research Professor of Law at Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law.


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Gideon’s Promise: Do Low Pay and Heavy Workloads Undermine the Right to Counsel?

Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:02:33 +0000

In its landmark 1963 decision Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court mandated the right to counsel in federal and state criminal proceedings. Fifty-one years after that unanimous decision, some question whether Gideon's promise has been fulfilled, as public defenders struggle against heavy caseloads, limited resources and low pay. On this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Jonathan Rapping, founder of the Atlanta-based public defender training program Gideon's Promise, and Dawn Porter, director and producer of the documentary Gideon's Army. Together they discuss the daily rigors faced by public defenders in the south, their personal beliefs about unequal access to justice, and their ideas about how to better deliver on the promise of Gideon.

Jonathan Rapping is the president and founder of Gideon's Promise, a training and support group for public defenders in the south aimed at creating greater access to justice for indigent defendants. He is also the director of the Honors Program in Criminal Justice at Atlanta's John Marshall Law School, where he teaches criminal law and criminal procedure. Rapping is the former director of public defender training programs in the District of Columbia, Georgia, and Louisiana. He is the recipient of the Lincoln Leadership Award from Kentucky's Department of Public Advocacy, the Sentencing Project Award from the National Association of Sentencing Advocates and Mitigation Specialists, and the Gideon's Promise Award from the Southern Center for Human Rights.

Dawn Porter is a lawyer and the founder of Trilogy Films. She was the director and producer of the award-winning Gideon's Army, a documentary about public defenders associated with Gideon's Promise, which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and aired on HBO Documentary Films. Prior to beginning her film and television career, Porter worked as an attorney at Baker and Hostetler and ABC Television Network. Among her many projects, she directed "Spies of Mississippi," a documentary on PBS about celebrity Chef Alexandra Guarnaschelli; produced "Serious Moonlight" starring Meg Ryan and Timothy Hutton; and produced "The Green," an independent feature starring Cheyenne Jackson (from 30 Rock) and Emmy-winning actress Julia Ormond.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
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Revenge Porn: Criminal Legislation vs. Rights and Freedoms

Mon, 07 Apr 2014 21:15:59 +0000

Six states have passed laws to address revenge porn, but critics say those laws may infringe upon First Amendment rights and subject people to needless criminal prosecution. Critics of anti-revenge porn laws believe the laws as drafted are overly broad, fail to exempt acceptable behavior, and create a chilling effect on otherwise legal expression. On this follow up episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Lee Rowland from the ACLU and Marc Randazza from the Randazza Legal Group. Together we discuss the potentially harmful components of non-consensual porn legislation and consider alternative avenues of redress for victims. Professor Mary Anne Franks of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a proponent of criminalizing revenge porn, joins us for the second half to debate criticisms of these laws. Tune in for a spirited debate about free speech, over-criminalization, and the proper way to address the troubling issue of revenge porn. For part one of this two-part series, please listen to Revenge Porn: Societal Costs and Legislative Solutions. Lee Rowland is a Staff Attorney with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project. Prior to joining the ACLU, she was a voting rights counsel with the Brennan Center for Justice, where she successfully represented the League of Women Voters of Florida and others in constitutional challenges to Florida's 2011 election law. Rowland previously ran the Reno office of the ACLU of Nevada, where she regularly argued before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Nevada Supreme Court. Marc Randazza is a First Amendment lawyer for the Randazza Legal Group located in Las Vegas, Nevada. A graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, he found his passion for the First Amendment while attending the University of Massachusetts at Amherst Journalism Program. Randazza has law offices in five states and represents both adult entertainment companies and private individuals. He is a regular contributor to news sources such as CNN and Fox News, and is a frequent commentator on legal issues to the international media. Professor Mary Anne Franks is the Vice President of Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. She holds a Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School and prior to her teaching career, obtained both her Masters and Ph.D. in Modern Languages and Literature as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. As par[...]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Revenge_Porn_Criminal_Legislation_vs_Rights_and_Freedoms_V3.mp3?dest-id=171194




Revenge Porn: Societal Costs and Legislative Solutions

Tue, 25 Mar 2014 16:00:00 +0000

The non-consensual posting of nude or sexual media by one person of another is known as Revenge Porn. Many victims report that this practice has had detrimental effects on their lives. Of those surveyed, 90 percent are women and 49 percent say they've been stalked or harassed. Despite the growing number of reports, most states' laws do not address the issue. On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview victim-advocate Dr. Holly Jacobs, a victim of revenge porn herself, and Professor Mary Anne Franks, both of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative. Together, they discuss the technical aspects of various states' laws that allow some types of posts while forbidding others. Many factors and technicalities, including who took the picture, how the image or video was obtained, and who posted it, can dictate whether posting the item was illegal. Tune in to this very special episode to learn what individual states and the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative are doing to combat Revenge Porn. A follow up episode with guest Lee Rowland from the American Civil Liberties Union will examine other legal issues regarding Revenge Porn. It will be released on April 8th.

Dr. Holly Jacobs is the Founder, President, and Executive Director of Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, which is the parent organization for the End Revenge Porn Campaign. She is a national commentator and writer on the subject and holds a PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. While pursuing her graduate degrees, Jacobs became a victim of revenge porn and has since dedicated her life towards providing resources and advocacy to victims of online harassment.

Professor Mary Anne Franks is the Vice President of Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. She holds a JD from Harvard Law School and prior to her teaching career, obtained both her Masters and PhD in Modern Languages and Literature as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. As part of her continuing efforts with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, she works with state legislatures to draft legislation against non-consensual pornography.


Media Files:
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The Ramifications of NSA Monitoring on Attorney-Client Privilege and the Bill of Rights

Tue, 11 Mar 2014 14:25:42 +0000

Attorney-Client Privilege predates US history and is a fixture of Western Law. Pro advocates of its proliferation declare its necessity to a fair and adequate defense. According to many legal experts, NSA monitoring of privileged attorney-client communications stands in direct violation to the United States Bill of Rights and yet others disagree. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams shed light on this issue with guests Dean Erwin Chemerinsky of the University of California, Irvine School of Law and Dr. John Eastman of Chapman University Fowler School of Law.

Erwin Chemerinsky is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at the University of California, Irvine School of Law. His areas of expertise include, but are not limited to, constitutional law, federal practice, and civil rights. Erwin is a renowned author of seven books and nearly 200 articles in top law reviews. He has argued before the nation's highest courts and has been counsel to detainees in Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp in the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. He is also a regular commentator on legal issues before the national and local media.

Dr. John Eastman is the Henry Salvatori Professor of Law and Community Service at Chapman University Fowler School of Law. He was the School's Dean from June 2007 to January 2010, when he stepped down to pursue a bid for California Attorney General. John is the Founding Director of the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence, former law clerk for Justice Clarence Thomas, and has served as the Director of Congressional and Public Affairs at the United States Commission on Civil Rights during the Reagan administration. He is also a regular commentator on legal issues before the national and local media.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/The_Ramifications_of_NSA_Monitoring.mp3?dest-id=171194




Marijuana, Federal Law, and the States: The Great Legal Divide

Tue, 25 Feb 2014 19:49:17 +0000

Federal law bans marijuana nationwide and yet some states have decided to license its trade. So, where does this leave citizens, local government, and attorneys who work in the cannabis industry? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Brian Vicente, Dan Riffle and Kathy Haddock to discuss the challenges and liabilities that persist in the void between federal and state drug laws.

Brian Vicente is a Colorado criminal defense attorney and founding partner of Vicente Sederberg. He also serves as Executive Director for Sensible Colorado, chairs the Denver Mayor's Marijuana Policy Review Panel, and coordinates the Colorado Bar Association's Drug Policy Project.

Dan Riffle is a former assistant prosecutor for Vinton County, Ohio who has turned lobbyist on Capitol Hill. He currently serves as the Director of Federal Policies for Marijuana Policy Project and has shepherded 2013 legislation through Illinois making it the second largest medical marijuana state.

Kathy Haddock is the Senior Assistant City Attorney for the City of Boulder, Colorado. She is primarily responsible for advising finance, records, elections, airport, special districts, and special projects including medical and recreational marijuana. She has also been responsible for drafting the laws that license and govern medical marijuana businesses in Boulder, Colorado.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Marijuana_Federal_Law_and_the_States_The_Great_Legal_Divide.mp3?dest-id=171194




Enhanced 911, The FCC, and a Grandfather’s Mandate for Direct Dial

Tue, 11 Feb 2014 22:03:49 +0000

In an emergency, seconds count. What if you couldn't call 911 because you couldn't reach an outside line? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews Henry "Hank" Hunt, the man petitioning for Kari's Law, and FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai. Together they discuss the importance of uniform dialing for 911.

Henry Hunt's nine year old granddaughter, through no fault of her own, could not reach 911 to save her mother. Despite her multiple attempts, the calls would not connect because the hotel's phone system required dialing 9 to get an outside line. In the wake of these events, this Texas grandfather started the Kari's Law petition which calls for mandated direct-dial 911.

Ajit Pai serves as FCC Commissioner focusing on regulatory environments where competition and innovation flourish. He is the former Associate General Counsel at Verizon. In addition, he has served as Senior Counsel with the Department of Justice and Chief Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Property Rights.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Enhanced_911.mp3?dest-id=171194




Diploma Privilege: Why Some Believe Bar Exams Should be Eliminated

Tue, 28 Jan 2014 22:57:00 +0000

Are Bar Exams really necessary? The Iowa State Bar Association isn't so sure. In this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Iowa State Bar Association President Guy Cook and Clinical Professor of Law John Whiston to learn why Iowa could soon offer Diploma Privilege for its law graduates. Cook is the current president of the Iowa State Bar Association. He is an Iowa native who has been practicing law for over 30 years. Guy is a board certified trial attorney, former federal prosecutor, and senior partner for Grefe and Sidney, P.L.C. where he practices exclusively in litigation. He also serves on the Board of Counselors of Drake University Law School. Whiston is a clinical professor of law at The University of Iowa College of Law. He teaches in the Clinical Legal Programs as well as courses in Evidence, Deposition Practice, Worker's Compensation, and Trial Advocacy. John is a former partner with Rossbach and Whiston, P.C. and has been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Diploma_Privilege_Why_Some_Believe_Bar_Exams_Should_be_Eliminated.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Legal Issues Behind Bitcoin's Rise in Value and Popularity

Tue, 14 Jan 2014 20:16:00 +0000

If you had bought $1,000 worth of Bitcoins in 2010, you would have $2.4 million dollars today. The anonymous, Internet-based currency has seen an exponential rise in value and popularity since its inception in 2009. This raises legal questions regarding the legitimacy, the legalities, and what lawyers need to know about this new currency. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite Bitcoin experts, attorney Lowell D. Ness and journalist Kashmir Hill, to provide some answers and a foretelling of the e-currency's future. Ness is a partner of the nationwide law firm Perkins Coie which has extensive experience in virtual currency. The firm's Virtual Currency Report Blog, which Lowell regularly contributes to, provides a legal outlook on the state of bitcoin and the market. Lowell's practice focuses on high-growth emerging companies and involves venture capital financings, mergers and acquisitions, public offerings, and private placements. Senior Online Editor of Forbes, Hill is a privacy pragmatist with an interest in the intersection of law, technology, social media, and personal information. Former editor of Above the Law, she has been following the Bitcoin story from the start, and will be releasing an e-book documenting Bitcoin's rise later this year. Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/The_Legal_Issues_Behind_Bitcoins_Rise_in_Value_and_Popularity.mp3?dest-id=171194




Top Legal Stories of 2013

Tue, 31 Dec 2013 10:40:05 +0000

In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite Allen Pusey and Molly McDonough of the ABA Journal to recap the past year’s legal news. Consider this a crash course on news stories such as Edward Snowden, gun control, and Obamacare. The discussion will not only cover the top stories of the year but also find the common themes in this year’s news and foretell what to keep an eye on in 2014.

Pusey has been with the ABA Journal since 2007 and was named editor and publisher in 2011. Prior to the ABA Journal, he worked for 26 years at the Dallas Morning News as an investigative reporter, feature writer, special projects editor, and U.S. Supreme Court correspondent.

McDonough is the deputy managing editor of the ABA Journal. She currently oversees online operations and special projects, including the Legal Rebels series and the annual Blawg 100. Molly has covered the courts and the legal profession for more than 20 years. She has been a reporter and editor for the National Law Journal, as well as a reporter for many other news sources.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Top_Legal_Stories_of_2013.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Legal Turbulence Facing Amazon’s Drones

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 10:52:04 +0000

News of Amazon’s plans to use delivery drones surprised many, but the fact is that a number of companies are developing drones for commercial uses. However, before any of these commercial drones can take flight, they need to clear a series of legal hurdles, from winning FAA approval to sorting out liability and privacy issues. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi invites industry lawyer Ben Gielow and Above the Law editor Elie Mystal to discuss the legal issues facing commercial drones and how they are likely to play out.

Ben Gielow is the government relations manager and general counsel for the advocacy sector of the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. He has been featured in interviews covering the concept of commercial drones since the beginning regarding what legislation and other requirements are necessary for us to see commercial drones in our airways.

Elie Mystal is the editor of Above the Law. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he left his life as a litigator to pursue a career as an online provocateur. He has written editorials for The New York Daily News, The New York Times, and appeared on MSNBC and Fox News.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/The_Legal_Turbulence_Facing_Amazons_Drones.mp3?dest-id=171194




Google v. Authors Guild: The 8-Year-Legal Battle Comes to a Close

Tue, 03 Dec 2013 11:50:17 +0000

This landmark case, involving Google’s digitization project of scanning 20-million books to make them searchable through the Internet, was decided in favor of Google. “In my mind, this is a fair-use case that we will never see again,” Andrew Albanese, senior writer for Publisher’s Weekly, said, declaring the case a benchmark for future decisions. It was ruled that Google met the requirements of fair use and all four factors in defense of copyright infringement. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams chat with Andrew Albanese about the case, whether this constitutes transformative use, and what this case means for the online-media industry as a whole.

Andrew Albanese has been covering Google vs. Authors Guild since it’s inception in 2005. As senior writer for Publishers Weekly, he focuses on copyright wars and how the Internet is changing protected works. His book, The Battle of $9.99: How Apple, Amazon and the “Big Six” Publishers Changed the E-Book Business Overnight, covered the Apple price-fixing case and the introduction of e-books to society.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Google_v_Authors_Guild_The_8_Year_Legal_Battle_Comes_to_a_Close.mp3?dest-id=171194




Is U.S. District Judge Scheindlin’s Removal a Question of Judges’ First Amendment Rights?

Wed, 20 Nov 2013 09:50:24 +0000

“It’s impossible to figure out exactly what the judge did wrong,” University of Pennsylvania Law Professor Kermit Roosevelt says, discussing Federal District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin’s removal from Floyd, et al. v. The City of New York, known as the “stop-and-frisk” case. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the Judge “ran afoul” of the Code of Conduct for United States Judges given her participation in media interviews and by making public statements about the “stop and frisk” case. The 2nd Circuit’s ruling did not provide further detail or examples. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, your host J. Craig Williams invites Roosevelt to discuss Scheindlin’s removal, whether this action is a question of judge’s first amendment rights, and the possible outcomes of her appeal.

Roosevelt is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Working in a diverse range of fields, he focuses in constitutional law and conflict law. Professor Roosevelt was recently a part of a New York Times Room for Debate, discussing Scheindlin’s removal and what restrictions should be placed on judges. He has also served as a law clerk to Supreme Court Associate Justice David H. Souter and D.C. Circuit Court Judge Stephen F. Williams.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Is_Federal_District_Court_Judge_Scheindlins_Removal_a_Question_of_Judges_First_Amendment_Rights.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Lavabit Legal Battle: Should the Government Have Access to Secure Email?

Tue, 05 Nov 2013 12:50:00 +0000

Several email providers across the nation have chosen to shut down in reaction to the government subpoena of Lavabit's data. Ladar Levison, CEO of secure email provider Lavabit, chose to end operations after the government requested the company's SSL keys, which would grant access to more than 400,000 users' emails. Levison challenged the subpoenas under the fourth amendment and organizations including the ACLU and EFF have filed amicus briefs on behalf of Lavabit but at this juncture, the security of secure email is unknown. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite Attorney Jesse R. Binnall, Levison's counsel, to discuss the case, what it means for all secure email providers, and how it affects lawyers' responsibility for protecting their clients' digital information.

Jesse R. Binnall is a partner of Bronley and Binnall, PLLC. His practice areas include civil litigation, small business and non-profit law, commercial lease disputes, appellate litigation, and election law. He has litigated cases in some of the busiest and most respected courts in the nation, including the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia and the Fairfax County Circuit Court. He also maintains an active appellate practice.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/110513_The_Lavabit_Legal_Battle_L2L_Final.mp3?dest-id=171194




F. Lee Bailey and Kenneth Fishman Discuss Excellence in Cross Examination

Tue, 22 Oct 2013 16:35:08 +0000

Cross-examination is a skill that every trial lawyer hopes to master, but few do. In the new book, Excellence in Cross Examination, published by Thomson Reuters, two giants of the trial bar, F. Lee Bailey and Judge Kenneth J. Fishman, share their insights and lessons on how to excel in cross-examination. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi invites Bailey and Fishman to discuss their newest book and the key skills lawyers need to be effective in cross.

Having represented high-profile names such as O.J. Simpson, Dr. Sam Sheppard, and Captain Ernest Medina, F. Lee Bailey is known for his successful career as a trial lawyer in criminal and civil cases. He has been a licensed attorney for more than 50 years, authored and co-authored 21 books, and is a licensed private investigator. In addition to his legal career, he has worked as a designated naval aviator with the U.S. Marine Corps.

The Honorable Kenneth J. Fishman was a practicing attorney for nearly 30 years before he moved to the bench. This marks his tenth year as an associate justice for the Massachusetts Superior Court. A former law partner with Bailey, he is a frequent speaker and lecturer for the Massachusetts Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and The Massachusetts Bar Institute.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/102213_F_Lee_Bailey_and_Kenneth_Fishman_Discuss_Excellence_in_Cross_Examination.mp3?dest-id=171194




What to Expect for the 2013-2014 Supreme Court Term

Mon, 07 Oct 2013 11:09:45 +0000

We saw a number of high-profile cases in the last Supreme Court term. With the nation currently alert to gay rights and Obamacare, some say this new term has fallen under the radar. But take note – as the spotlight shifts to campaign finance laws, free speech, and the president’s power to make recess appointments – the upcoming docket could have some monumental decisions in store. On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite the editor of the SCOTUSblog Amy Howe and LA Times Supreme Court correspondent David Savage to discuss the new term.

• Amy Howe has been with SCOTUSblog since 2003. She has served as counsel in over two dozen merits cases at the Supreme Court and has argued two cases there. Howe has also co-taught Supreme Court litigation courses at Stanford and Harvard law schools.

• David Savage has been covering the court for nearly three decades. In addition to his work with the LA Times, he also writes a monthly column for the ABA Journal and is regularly featured on NPR’s Talk of the Nation. In 1992 he published Turning Right: The Making of the Rehnquist Supreme Court, outlining the efforts of the Reagan and first Bush administrations to remake the high court.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/What_to_Expect_for_the_2013_2014_Supreme_Court_Term.mp3?dest-id=171194




How You Could Be Sued for Sending a Text Message

Mon, 23 Sep 2013 14:53:54 +0000

The New Jersey State Appeals Court recently ruled that texting someone while that person is driving may cause the sender to be liable if an accident occurs. Supporting arguments say those texting drivers are “virtually present” at the accident. This potential liability affects the distribution of responsibility amongst drivers when a collision occurs. On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, your hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite Attorneys Ted Frank and Marc Saperstein to the discuss the case ruling, whether this advisory ruling will effectively prevent distracted driving, if it’s a fair allocation of responsibility, and more.

• New Jersey Attorney Marc Saperstein is a founding member of Davis, Saperstein, and Solomon and a part of the New Jersey Association for Justice. He regularly lectures to fellow lawyers on current case law, class actions, and injury law. Saperstein has a special interest in distracted driving education and prevention.

• Manhattan Institute Attorney Ted Frank is the founder and president of Center for Class Action Fairness. He has written law reviews for The Washington Post, The Washington Journal, and The American Spectator. Frank is also on the executive committee of the Federalist Society Litigation Practice Group.

Thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/How_You_Could_Be_Sued_for_Sending_a_Text_Message.mp3?dest-id=171194




Defining the ObamaCare Essential Health Benefits

Tue, 10 Sep 2013 14:21:06 +0000

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, your host J. Craig Williams speaks with Dr. Shana Alex Lavarreda and David Cusano, Esq., two health-insurance industry professionals, on the implementation of the Essential Health Benefits within the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. ObamaCare. There are ten Essential Health Benefits that all states are required to include, but the missing element is the lack of definitions for these benefits – which leaves us all wondering how to confirm the 50 states are correctly implementing them.

• Dr. Shana Alex Lavarreda is the director of health insurance studies for the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Her research focuses on discontinuous health insurance, under insurance, as well as the political issues surrounding healthcare reform, at the state and federal level.

• David Cusano, Esq., works in Georgetown’s State Health Reform Assistance Network to provide technical assistance to state officials on implementing the Essential Health Benefits and the Affordable Care Act. He has previously worked as in-house counsel for insurance providers where he advised them on how to implement the ACA’s new requirements and on their day-to-day health care plan operations.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Defining_the_ObamaCare_Essential_Health_Benefits.mp3?dest-id=171194




Can We Constitutionally Implement Stop and Frisk?

Tue, 27 Aug 2013 15:33:33 +0000

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, Bob Ambrogi speaks with Sunita Patel of the Constitutional Center for Human Rights and Heather Mac Donald of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research on Judge Scheindlin's recent ruling, Floyd vs. City of New York, which deemed the NYPD’s use of the stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional.

• Sunita Patel, an attorney for the Center for Constitutional Rights, litigates racial profiling, immigrant justice, and other human rights issues. She represents the named plaintiffs in the Floyd class action, four minority men who argued that the stop-and-frisk law was being upheld unconstitutionally and caused indirect racial profiling. The case was filed by the CCR.

• Heather Mac Donald is a John M. Olin fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor at the City Journal. She covers a number of topics including immigration, policing and racial profiling, and the New York courts. She has been featured in numerous publications regarding why the stop-and-frisk ruling will increase New York crime.

Tune in to hear Patel and Mac Donald’s opinions on the stop-and-frisk policy and how it affects crime rates, what the ruling means for the NYPD and similar policies nationwide, and if they think stop and frisk can be carried out constitutionally.

A special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Stop_and_Frisk.mp3?dest-id=171194




New American Bar Association President James Silkenat Outlines His 2013-2014 Agenda

Tue, 13 Aug 2013 15:14:53 +0000

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams speak with ABA President James Silkenat, on his first day in office, about his goals and initiatives for the ABA agenda.

James Silkenat has been working in international law for more than forty years. He joined the ABA’s first delegation to China in the mid-1970s and since then has chaired the International Law Section. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the American Law Institute, and has served as a Fellow in the U.S. State Department Scholar/Diplomat Program. As well as numerous other positions in and outside of the ABA, he will now serve as the president of the nation’s largest legal organization.

Silkenat will discuss his major platform goals for his presidency, including the legal education financing system and student debt, a legal job corps, the ABA’s stance on gun violence, and more.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/New_ABA_President_James_Silkenat_Outlines_His_2013_2014_Agenda.mp3?dest-id=171194




Should a Chimpanzee Have Human Rights?

Mon, 29 Jul 2013 13:18:18 +0000

If it’s not legally a human, it’s a thing. But animal rights advocates argue these alternatives fail to recognize that there are many cognitively complex species who deserve to be treated as people. The Nonhuman Rights Project is planning to file a writ of habeas corpus on behalf of a chimp to grant her the right to bodily liberty. This will release her from the cage she is currently living in, and the project will have her admitted into a cageless sanctuary. Steven M. Wise, president of The Nonhuman Rights Project, has been researching and planning this case for 20 years.

Steven M. Wise has been practicing animal protection law nationwide for for the past 30 years. He was the first professor to teach animal law at Harvard University and is still teaching animal law courses all over the world. He has published four books on the matter, including Rattling the Cage – Toward Legal Rights for Animals.

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams will talk with Wise about the case to grant a chimp the right to bodily liberty and The Nonhuman Rights Project’s long-term plans for animal rights

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Should_a_Chimpanzee_Have_Human_Rights.mp3?dest-id=171194




Post DOMA and Prop 8 Rulings: The Next Move for Gay Rights

Fri, 12 Jul 2013 16:15:47 +0000

With the Supreme Court’s Prop 8 and DOMA rulings, same-sex marriage is now legal in California and same-sex married couples can receive federal benefits across the nation. These landmark decisions for gay rights have sparked the question: is nationwide marriage equality on the way? On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams will talk with Constitutional Law Professors Mark Tushnet and William Eskridge about what the history of both the gay rights and the civil rights movements have to say for the future of gay rights in America.

• Harvard Law Professor Mark Tushnet specializes in constitutional law and theory, with a focus in examining the practice of judicial review in the U.S. and worldwide. He has served as a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall. Currently, his focus is in constitutional history and the development of civil liberties. He is known for his critical and controversial analysis of Supreme Court rulings, including Brown v. The Board of Education and Roe v. Wade.

• William Eskridge, Yale Law Professor, focuses in statutory interpretation. He represented a same-sex-married couple from 1990-1995 who sued for recognition of their marriage and has published many books covering the political framework of gay rights. The historical component of his book GayLaw was the basis of an amicus brief he drafted for the Cato Institute and for much of the Court’s (and dissenting opinion’s) analysis in Lawrence vs. Texas, the decision which made same-sex sexual activity legal in every U.S. state.

These law professors will provide unique insight to the future of gay rights through their knowledge and experience with Supreme Court rulings and civil liberties movements.

Thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Post_DOMA_and_Prop_8_Rulings.mp3?dest-id=171194




Is Batman Legally Dead?

Tue, 02 Jul 2013 15:00:38 +0000

On this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, J. Craig Williams chats with Entertainment Lawyer Michael Baroni and superhero-law expert James Daily about the ending of The Dark Knight Rises. Proceed with caution – there are spoilers ahead! The city of Gotham sees Batman die at the end of the film. Does that mean that Bruce Wayne is legally dead, as well? And if so, who gets the batmobiles? Legally speaking, Warner Brothers’ design patent on the batmobile will run out, as will their patent on the story. Will another company fill the role and bring back Batman?

• Baroni has been watching the Batman films since he was a kid and continues to be an enthusiast. Batman fan by night, he works as general counsel for Palace Entertainment by day. He is also a member of the Orange County Bar Association.

• Daily is co-author of the book The Law of Superheroes and the blog Law and Multiverse. Both publications discuss the hypothetical legal ramifications behind comic book characters and their powers. When James isn’t meticulously analyzing the law of comic books and characters, he works in intellectual property and patent law.

Tune in for, what Baroni describes as, the perfect “legal cocktail chatter” on the legalities behind Batman’s death, what he left behind, and the chances of a resurrection of one of America’s most beloved comic-book characters.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Is_Batman_Legally_Dead.mp3?dest-id=171194




Personal Audio vs. Electronic Frontier Foundation: The “Podcast Patent” Dispute

Fri, 21 Jun 2013 13:27:10 +0000

Personal Audio’s founder Jim Logan created and patented an idea which, in his eyes, covers the concept of podcasting. “This is the story of the American inventor,” Richard Baker, Personal Audio’s vice president of licensing, says. Personal Audio has filed lawsuits against several podcasters and media companies, claiming patent infringement by popular programs such as NBC’s The Adam Carolla Show and by CBS for its podcast distribution of multiple shows including The Voice and Meet the Press. On the other side, The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has spearheaded a campaign dubbed “Save Podcasting!” to rescind Personal Audio’s patent. EFF’s goal is to revoke Personal Audio’s right to compensation from any podcast program. Daniel Nazer, a staff attorney working on the campaign, represents EFF on the program.

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams talk with Richard Baker and Brad Liddle, Personal Audio’s president of licensing, and Daniel Nazer of EFF to hear their thoughts on what defines a patent troll, the specifics behind the cases, and more.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/The_Podcast_Patent_Dispute.mp3?dest-id=171194




Sacramento’s New One-Day Divorce Program

Wed, 05 Jun 2013 12:57:29 +0000

On this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams invite California Judge James Mize to discuss his first-of-its-kind idea to address the heavy congestion of divorce cases in Sacramento’s family court: The One-Day Divorce Program. This allows couples, who meet the specified requirements, to participate in an expedited divorce process that finalizes the separation in just one day. This program aims to serve couples who can’t afford a divorce lawyer. According to Judge Mize, 72% of family law litigants in California don’t have representation.

Judge Mize began his career with an undergraduate degree in psychology, followed by graduate work at the School of Social Welfare where he earned his Master of Social Work. He found his work in social issues to be a defining part of his 26 years working as an attorney, and his current work on the bench. He has served as the presiding judge of the Sacramento Superior Court and is currently the supervising judge of Sacramento’s Family Court. Judge Mize is best known for his civil reform efforts which have garnered him several honors including the California Judge Association’s Alba Witkin Humanitarian Award and Sacramento County Bar Association’s Judge of the Year Award.

Tune into to hear about the inner workings of the new one-day divorce program, who qualifies, how it’s run, and more.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/One_Day_Divorce.mp3?dest-id=171194




Private Prisons, Profits, and Prisoners’ Rights

Fri, 17 May 2013 14:56:35 +0000

On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi discusses private prisons with Susan Herman, president of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and Adrian Moore, vice president of the Reason Foundation, a non-profit in support of libertarian principles and privatization. Susan Herman was elected president of the ACLU in October 2008. As Centennial Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, she teaches courses in the area of Criminal Law and Procedure and Constitutional Law. The ACLU has been studying and protesting against private prisons as a for-profit business for decades. Dr. Adrian Moore is vice president of policy at the Reason Foundation. He has conducted studies, written publications and scholarly articles on the privatization of prisons and how they yield quality corrections at a lower cost. He has served on boards and commissions developing or overseeing privatization at the federal, state, and local level. Tune in to hear Herman and Moore debate and discuss the colossal incarceration rate, the profit motives of private prisons, the politics behind it all, and the impact on prisoners’ rights. Special Thanks to our sponsor, Clio.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/Private_Prisons.mp3?dest-id=171194




Will Accused Boston Marathon Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Get the Death Penalty?

Fri, 03 May 2013 17:03:30 +0000

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving brother of the accused for the Boston marathon bombings, has become a face of the media lately. His prosecution and potential sentence raises many questions for both the public and the legal world. Attorneys and co-hosts Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi join Attorney Jack Cunha and Professor Douglas Berman to discuss the prosecution and trial of the suspect. • Jack Cunha, of Cunha & Holcomb, is a practicing criminal attorney based in Boston, Massachusetts. A former instructor at Suffolk and Harvard Law Schools, Cunha lectures nationally for various associations and schools such as The National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys, Harvard Law, and CLE Programs mainly on criminal defense. • Douglas Berman, Professor of Law at The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law, has taught a myriad of courses at Ohio State including criminal law, criminal punishment and sentencing, and the death penalty. He is co-author of a casebook, Sentencing Law and Policy: Cases, Statutes, and Guidelines. He also writes a popular blog titled Sentencing Law and Policy. Tune in to hear what these experienced professionals have to say as they answer questions such as: Although Massachusetts outlawed the death penalty in 1984, will prosecutors use federal law to seek the death penalty for Tsarnaev? Will the fact that the suspect is only 19 call for mitigation? and more.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/L2L_Boston_Bombing.mp3?dest-id=171194




Lawyer2Lawyer: A Retrospective

Wed, 31 Oct 2012 14:16:45 +0000

We started Lawyer2Lawyer back in August of 2005 with the idea of providing quality content and discussion of timely legal news and information for the legal profession with regularly published podcasts and often videos too. Since our inception, we have set the precedent for legal podcasting in numbers of listeners globally, but more importantly, we’ve been one of the leaders in great content - our priority over the past 7 years. On this final edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams, talk about their personal experiences over the years with this legal podcast.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_103012_FinalShow.mp3?dest-id=171194




Legal Implications Surrounding the Meningitis Scare

Wed, 24 Oct 2012 15:36:13 +0000

The New England Compounding Center (NECC) shipped out tainted steroid shots to 23 states in what authorities believe resulted in a national fungal meningitis outbreak. Lawyer2Lawyer host Craig Williams chats with Attorney Michael F. Barrett, a personal injury attorney from the firm, Saltz Mongeluzzi Barrett & Bendesky, PC and Glenn Cohen, Assistant Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, about the litigation stemming from this meningitis scare, the role of the FDA and CDC and regulation.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_102412_Meningitis.mp3?dest-id=171194




Prop 34, The Death Penalty Initiative Statute

Thu, 11 Oct 2012 16:22:57 +0000

On November 6, 2012, Proposition 34 will be one of the initiatives on the ballot in the state of California. If approved, Prop 34 will eliminate the death penalty in California and replace it with life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. Lawyer2Lawyer host Craig Williams joins Attorney Donald H. Heller to discuss Proposition 34, support and opposition and ultimately the impact on our prison and justice system.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_101012_Prop34.mp3?dest-id=171194




Defending a Serial Killer

Wed, 03 Oct 2012 15:34:38 +0000

What is it like to defend one of America’s most infamous serial killers? Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join retired judge and lawyer, Sam L. Amirante, and retired lawyer, Daniel J. Broderick, to discuss their new book, John Wayne Gacy: Defending a Monster, and the constitutional right to a defense.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_100312_SerialKiller.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Presidential Race and the Judiciary

Wed, 26 Sep 2012 15:18:52 +0000

On November 6, 2012, people across the States will cast their vote for President. Whatever the outcome, it will influence our justice system. Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join Kenneth L. Manning, a professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth and Professor Carl Tobias from the University of Richmond School of Law, to discuss everything from diversity in the courts, Supreme Court vacancies and obstruction and the impact on the justice system.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_092612_Judiciary.mp3?dest-id=171194




Key changes to Patent Law

Wed, 19 Sep 2012 15:13:11 +0000

Back on September 16, 2011, President Obama signed the America Invents Act (AIA) into law, vastly changing the core of the patent system and patent law. Now, a year later, some of the key provisions are going into effect. Lawyer2Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi talks with Attorney Matthew I. Kreeger, the Co-Chair of Morrison Foerster’s Patent Interferences Practice Group and Dennis Crouch, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Missouri School of Law and editor of Patently-O, about the implementation of some of the most important provisions of the America Invents Act and their impact.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_091912_AmericaInvents.mp3?dest-id=171194




Civility as an Art Form in Diplomacy and the Law

Wed, 12 Sep 2012 15:30:16 +0000

Civility is a skill in the management of differences, disagreements and conflict and is good for the law profession. So how essential is civility to the legal profession? And is it practiced well by lawyers? Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join Dick A. Semerdjian from the firm Schwartz Semerdjian Ballard & Cauley LLP and chair of the ABA Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS), to discuss the status of civility in the legal profession.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_091212_Civility.mp3?dest-id=171194




Predictive Policing and the Law

Wed, 05 Sep 2012 15:11:37 +0000

Some law enforcement agencies, like the Los Angeles Police Department, are turning to crime prediction software to aid in decreasing the rising crime rate, better known as predictive policing. Weighing the advantages of these programs to reduce crime raises questions about racial profiling within specific neighborhoods and our civil liberties. Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join Dr. Jeff Brantingham, co-founder of the company, PredPol and Professor Andrew G. Ferguson from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, as they look at the legal issues surrounding predictive policing.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_090512_CrimePrediction.mp3?dest-id=171194




Lawyer2Lawyer 7th Anniversary

Wed, 29 Aug 2012 15:14:57 +0000

On the longest continually produced legal podcast, Lawyer2Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and J.Craig Williams share their experiences with great guests and insightful legal topics - some serious and some not so serious. And hear a behind the scenes special interview.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_082812_7Anniversary.mp3?dest-id=171194




From the Courtroom to the Comedy Club

Tue, 21 Aug 2012 13:32:37 +0000

Lawyers are very often the brunt of jokes, but there is a group of attorneys that has turned the tables and is making people laugh with them instead of at them. Lawyer2Lawyer co-hosts and attorneys, Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams, share the stage with two of the Comedians At Law. Alex Barnett and Matt Ritter explain how they transitioned from lawyers to comics and how they now make people laugh at the lighter side of the law.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_082012_Comedians.mp3?dest-id=171194




Back to School Spotlight on Law Students

Wed, 15 Aug 2012 16:22:20 +0000

It’s about that time of year again where law students brush off the summer days and head back to school. In this very special "Back to School" edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, co-host and attorney, Craig Williams, chats with law students Daren Gottlieb from Western State College of Law in Fullerton, California and Han Fang from New England Law Boston, about why they chose law school, top concerns, personal goals, jobs, competition and next steps after graduation.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_081512_LawStudents.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Impact of Voter ID Laws and Voter Purges

Wed, 08 Aug 2012 10:48:41 +0000

Before 2006, not a single US state required voters to show identification before marking a ballot. But now, 30 states have enacted some sort of voter identification law. Are these laws necessary to prevent voter fraud or are laws being passed to discourage low income groups, the elderly and minorities from voting? Lawyer2Lawyer co-host and attorney, Craig Williams, joins Professor Richard L. Hasen, from the University of California, Irvine and Wendy Weiser, Director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, to talk voter ID laws in battleground states, voter purges and the potential impact on the upcoming election.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_080712_VoterPurge.mp3?dest-id=171194




Legal Issues Surrounding the Colorado Movie Massacre

Thu, 02 Aug 2012 16:36:25 +0000

The Aurora, Colorado movie theater massacre left 12 people dead and 58 wounded. The latest mass shooting in America brings up many legal issues on a national scale, including gun control, the insanity defense, liability and the death penalty. Lawyer2Lawyer co-hosts and attorneys, Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams, analyze the legal arguments of this case with Professor Adam Winkler from UCLA School of Law and Professor Daniel Filler from the Earle Mack School of Law at Drexel University.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_080212_ColoradoShooting.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Controversial War on Drugs

Wed, 25 Jul 2012 14:26:56 +0000

Back in 1971, Richard Nixon declared a "war on drugs" claiming "America’s Public Enemy No. 1 in the United States is drug abuse". Forty years later, we are still waging a war against drugs. Lawyer2Lawyer co-hosts and attorneys, Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join Ethan Nadelmann, founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance and Judge Jim Gray, author of Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It, as they spotlight the controversial war on drugs including: the legalization of Marijuana, the rise in prescription drug use, sentencing reform and what needs to happen legally to eliminate this growing problem.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_072412_DrugWar.mp3?dest-id=171194




The Return of Black Lung and the Law

Tue, 17 Jul 2012 15:11:24 +0000

A recent investigation found the rate of miners diagnosed with Black Lung Disease is surging after nearly three decades of decline. Some blame lenient regulations, lax enforcement, even manipulation of air samples from mines. Lawyer2Lawyer co-hosts and attorneys, Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams, get the reasons behind this shocking increase and a breakdown of Black Lung litigation from Chris Hamby, the author of the Center for Public Integrity report, and Attorney Stephen Sanders, the director of Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_071512_BlackLung.mp3?dest-id=171194




Social Media and Lawsuits

Thu, 12 Jul 2012 12:40:12 +0000

From "tweets" to Facebook status updates, social media has taken over how we communicate with the outside world. It has also become a large part of our legal system. Social media is now considered key evidence in both criminal cases and civil lawsuits. Lawyer2Lawyer co-hosts and attorneys, Craig Williams and Bob Ambrogi examine the surge in social media-based evidence and claims in litigation, as well as the importance of educating attorneys on the ins and outs of social media with Attorney Antigone Peyton, Founder and CEO of Cloudigy® Law, PLLC and Attorney Ernest Svenson, solo attorney and blogger.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/l2l/C2C_071112_SocialMediaLitigation.mp3?dest-id=171194