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Preview: Making IT Stick

Making IT Stick



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User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:45:27 +0000




User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:30:28 +0000

View my public RSS subscriptions
Making IT Stick blog post
I've felt for a long time that telling stories is the best way to communicate with people. Stories resonate, and everyone has a story or two. So, Making IT Stick, is comprised of four stories, focusing on imagination, innovation, school climate and culture, and the concept of stickiness. The stories are:
1. Sticky "Back in the day"
2. Sticky Today



User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:30:09 +0000




User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:29:18 +0000

View my public RSS subscriptions
Making IT Stick blog post
I've felt for a long time that telling stories is the best way to communicate with people. Stories resonate, and everyone has a story or two. So, Making IT Stick, is comprised of four stories, focusing on imagination, innovation, school climate and culture, and the concept of stickiness. The stories are:
1. Sticky "Back in the day"
2. Sticky Today



User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:28:26 +0000

View my public RSS subscriptions
Making IT Stick blog post
Presentation:
I've felt for a long time that telling stories is the best way to communicate with people. Stories resonate, and everyone has a story or two. So, Making IT Stick, is comprised of four stories, focusing on imagination, innovation, school climate and culture, and the concept of stickiness. The stories are:
1. Sticky "Back in the day"



User edited FrontPage

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 14:25:58 +0000




User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:51:49 +0000

Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.
Introducing the Macintosh | Steve Jobs. Watch Jobs in the following movie to see what "sticky" looks like...
MacYou know the Macintosh is sticky when you see this: Mac Classic basement
Innovation: the introduction of something new.
Imagination leads to innovation.



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:50:47 +0000




User edited role of a teacher

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:50:14 +0000




User edited role of a teacher

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:49:59 +0000

Here is my vision of what a teacher should be in 2007 and beyond. I’ll call them the 4C’s. A teacher should be a:
to students (please see Will’s post about classroom modeling of networks). students.
Conductor: the professional teacher orchestrates the classroom. Here is where the art of teaching elevates a room of kids, books, or computers, whatever…to that magical place where all 28 kids are tapped in, and you just know it. Leave that up to kids as suggested by the wiki? In my school, not a chance. Sorry. I want a professional educator as conductor, mixing assessment, content from many sources, connections, relationships, technology and pedagogy in the new classroom learning mashup.
Catalyst: an educator energizes the learning reaction. Makes it all happen, face to face, online, wherever, and now whenever, and knows when to speed it up and when to slow it down. The catalyst knows his or her kids, and their abilities, their strengths, weaknesses, and needs, and designs learning accordingly. The catalyst places students in learning situations where kids are capable of building their own understanding; the catalyst redirects, suggests, and pushes and pulls students towards independent learning.
Champion: a professional educator is a tireless advocate for, and a champion of kids and what they are capable of. The champion pushes, extends, and pulls things out of kids that you would never expect. The champion doesn’t give up; because the champion knows even the smallest difference can be THE difference for a kid. Schools still have these people, and you know who they are-these are people to be honored, their work celebrated….



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:33:06 +0000

3. How well do you know sticky?
4. The Seven Factors of Stickiness
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Story 1: Sticky Back in the Day
Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 03:32:25 +0000

3. How well do you know sticky?
4. The Seven Factors of Stickiness
<object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://s3.amazonaws.com/slideshare/ssplayer.swf?id=120038&doc=making-it-stick-f3978" width="425" height="348"><param name="movie" value="http://s3.amazonaws.com/slideshare/ssplayer.swf?id=120038&doc=making-it-stick-f3978" /></object>
Story 1: Sticky Back in the Day
Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 02:59:51 +0000

Pilot composition is absolutely critical. Who do you recruit for your pilot? Consider Malcolm Gladwell's idea of connectors-see The Tipping Point.
4. The innovation must clearly address an instructional need, with benefits for both teacher and student.
creation, access assessment data on which student is adding content as well as modifying content, while at the same time providing students with a way to connect digitally 24/7. 24/7 and learn valuable collaboration skills that will undoubtably serve them well in the future.
Examples:
Digital Dropbox
Discussion boards
Wiki pages
Google Earth and Maps
5. The technology has been taken out of the technology, or innovation.
surprising, kid friendly kid-friendly (we overestimate the global understanding of what kids know about various technologies). If you are going to start podcasting in your district, perhaps starting with simple systems like Evoca or Gcast (try the cell phone recording features that both platforms offer) makes sense before you start putting Audacity on your ghost or image.
For digital storytelling, consider Photostory 3 (PC) from Microsoft. Microsoft or of course, iMovie on the Mac. For tutorials, both printed and screencasts, see my Jakesonline.org here.
For geography classes, see My Maps from Google.
Examples:
MyMaps
6. The innovation must add value to an instructional process.
Youth TV), TV, and SchoolTube), video publishing becomes even more attractive.
Also see Slideshare.net for posting PowerPoints online.
Also see GoogleLit Trips, where the geographical locations of famous novels have been plotted in Google Earth-in my opinion, this creates an entirely new approach to teaching literature.



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 01:41:22 +0000

Making IT Stick blog postPresentation: of five four stories, focusing on imagination, innovation, school climate and culture, and the concept of stickiness. The stories are:1. Sticky "Back in the day"2. Sticky Today3. The Raw Materials of Sticky4. How well do you know sticky?5.4. The Seven Factors of StickinessStory 1: Sticky Back in the DayDo you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything. Steve Jobs. Watch JobsScenesfrom in the above following movie were created in Scenemaker. to see what "sticky" looks like...Mac Classic basementInnovation: the introduction of something new.My vision of the role of a teacher in 2007: The 4 C'sStory 2: Sticky Today do outside. Yes!But outside? How large is that disconnect? How much do they have to "power down?"Kids are fairly savvy users of technology, but what do kids really know?Cell phonesIMWe overstimate what kids really know about technology. We underestimate their affinity for learning about new things.Let's take advantage of that natural affinity and leverage it to really produce learners! Let's focus them. Let's turn online entertainment time into online educational time.... networks, so how can we leverage that into learning? Kids started with Ratemyteachers.com, have moved on to MySpace and Facebook, plus a host of others. others.For an interesting glimpse at what these kids can do in a mash-up world, watch the following video, featuring snowboarder Shaun White.Shaun White VideoStory 3: How well do you know sticky?OLPC laptop | see photographs of the release of laptops to Nigerian studentsIn your school, are these sticky? Are these tools sticky outside of school?The upshot: what are the characteristics of a school's climate and culture that enable an innovation to become a seamless part of the fabric of what a school does and is? What are the characteristics of the innovation itself that promote stickiness? I've got seven factors to consider. Read on...Story 4: The Seven Factors of Stickiness1. The innovation must have multiple entry points for a spectrum of usership.Everybody can use the innovation for something. There also must be growth potential for all, with the goal of moving every user to the right in terms of their ability to utilize the innovation for learning. This describes a content management system like Blackboard or Moodle, that has the potential to deliver a host of technology services that range from classroom management functionality (announcements, posting documents) to learning capabilities (blogs, wikis, Turnitin.com integration, discussion boards). With these systems, beginning users can accomplish simple tasks (and building confidence goes a long way in continued use and growth), users of intermediate skills can jump in and use such things as discussion boards and Turnitin.com, advanced users can take advantage of the integration of Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, RSS). An additional, and very important aspect of this is to provide one place, easily understood and fearlessly supported, that can provide a wide-range of technology services to teachers and students. I want teachers to use the technology to help kids learn, and the more simple and easy it is to deliver and use, the greater the likelihood that the technology makes an impact.Example: user: announcements, posting announcements and documents for simple course managementIntermediate user: establishing and extending class discussions in discussion[...]



User edited FrontPage

Fri, 28 Sep 2007 01:24:57 +0000

4. How well do you know sticky?
5. The Seven Factors of Stickiness
Here are my seven principles that make an technology innovation in education classroom "sticky." Add your comments or ideas to the mix. Start a new page. To get started, click the edit button....
Story 1: Sticky Back in the Day
Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.



User edited FrontPage

Thu, 27 Sep 2007 04:02:33 +0000

Keynote Presentation: Making IT Stick
TechForum Chicago, April 27, 2007, Itasca, Illinois Google Map
David S. Jakes
Instructional Technology Coordinator
Community High School District 99
Downers Grove, IL 60563
djakes@csd99.org
dave@jakesonline.org
dsjakes@gmail.com
Download a printed copy of this presentation | Keynote Presentation.pdf
Visit my blog at The Strength of Weak Ties
Let's take advantage of that natural affinity and leverage it to really produce learners! Let's focus them. Let's turn online entertainment time into online educational time....
Kids also know social networks, how can we leverage that into learning? Kids started with Ratemyteachers.com, have moved on to MySpace and Facebook, plus a host of others.
Why not create your own MySpace, with Ning? See Classroom 2.0 as an example.
Shaun White Video
Story 3: How well do you know sticky?



User edited FrontPage

Sat, 28 Apr 2007 13:27:11 +0000

Keynote Presentation: Making IT Stick
Itasca, Illinois Illinois Google Map
David S. Jakes
Instructional Technology Coordinator



User edited FrontPage

Wed, 25 Apr 2007 01:23:20 +0000

djakes@csd99.org
dave@jakesonline.org
Download a printed copy of this presentation | Keynote Presentation.pdf
Visit my blog at The Strength of Weak Ties
Visit Jakesonline.org, my Web site



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 21:03:18 +0000

Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.
Introducing the Macintosh | Steve Jobs
Scenes fromScenesfrom the above movie were created in Scenemaker.
Scene
1:Jobs introducing the Mac Scenemaker.
Mac Classic basement
Innovation: the introduction of something new.



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:59:59 +0000

Introducing the Macintosh | Steve Jobs
Scenes from the above movie were created in Scenemaker.
Scene 1: Jobs 1:Jobs introducing the Mac
Mac Classic basement
Innovation: the introduction of something new.



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:58:49 +0000




User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:58:11 +0000

Introducing the Macintosh | Steve Jobs
Scenes from the above movie were created in Scenemaker.
Scene 1: Jobs introducing the Mac
Mac Classic basement
Innovation: the introduction of something new.



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:55:54 +0000

Why not create your own MySpace, with Ning? See Classroom 2.0 as an example.
Shaun White Video
Story 4: 3: How well do you know sticky?
Web 2.0 tools: www.web2logo.com lists a phenomenal number of Web 2.0 tools. Are these tools or resources sticky?
Moodle
OLPC laptop | see photographs of the release of laptops to Nigerian students
In your school, are these sticky? Are these tools sticky outside of school?
Videos:
Dove
Beauty
Shanghai
American School Channel
Story
5:Story 4: The Seven Factors of Stickiness
1. The innovation must have multiple entry points for a spectrum of usership.
Everybody can use the innovation for something. There also must be growth potential for all, with the goal of moving every user to the right in terms of their ability to utilize the innovation for learning. This describes a content management system like Blackboard or Moodle, that has the potential to deliver a host of technology services that range from classroom management functionality (announcements, posting documents) to learning capabilities (blogs, wikis, Turnitin.com integration, discussion boards). With these systems, beginning users can accomplish simple tasks (and building confidence goes a long way in continued use and growth), users of intermediate skills can jump in and use such things as discussion boards and Turnitin.com, advanced users can take advantage of the integration of Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, RSS). An additional, and very important aspect of this is to provide one place, easily understood and fearlessly supported, that can provide a wide-range of technology services to teachers and students. I want teachers to use the technology to help kids learn, and the more simple and easy it is to deliver and use, the greater the likelihood that the technology makes an impact.



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:53:08 +0000

Do you remember the ditto machine? The opaque projector, the 16 mm. film, and your first calculator? These by default were sticky, there were no other choices. But with the emergence of "microcomputers" and tools like laserdiscs, things changed. The introduction of Macintosh computers into education changed everything.
Introducing the Macintosh | Steve Jobs
Scenes from the above movie were created in Scenemaker.
Mac Classic basement
Innovation: the introduction of something new.



User edited FrontPage

Mon, 23 Apr 2007 20:46:01 +0000

4. The innovation must clearly address an instructional need, with benefits for both teacher and student.
If it doesn't why bother? The digital dropbox in Blackboard, as simple as it seems, provides a methodology for student transfer of files as well as the electronic submission of digital assignments. The discussion boards have been huge for our teachers, and provide all the opportunity for all to contribute. The wiki pages in Blackboard provide teachers with the ability to set up a digital space for product creation, while at the same time providing students with a way to connect digitally 24/7.
Examples:
Discussion boards
Wiki pages

5. The technology has been taken out of the technology, or innovation.
It has to be teacher-friendly, and surprising, kid friendly (we overestimate the global understanding of what kids know about various technologies). If you are going to start podcasting in your district, perhaps starting with simple systems like Evoca or Gcast (try the cell phone recording features that both platforms offer) makes sense before you start putting Audacity on your ghost or image.
For digital storytelling, consider Photostory 3 (PC) from Microsoft. For tutorials, both printed and screencasts, see my Jakesonline.org here.
For geography classes, see My Maps from Google.
Examples:
Evoca
Photostory
MyMaps

6. The innovation must add value to an instructional process.
It must take the learning to a new place, a place where the learning could not go unless the innovation had been included. The process of digital storytelling adds value to the process of writing, and gives students the capability to develop voice with an entirely new medium, one that can potentially reach a world-wide audience. With the emergence of online video sites, such as YouTube and Google Video, teachers and students now have a publishing platform that can reach millions. And with the emergence of other video sites that specifically target the promotion of student voice (uthTV, pronounced Youth TV), video publishing becomes even more attractive.
7. There must be visible and tangible results indicating that the innovation improves student learning.
This is the big one, and how do you measure student learning as the result of the inclusion of the innovation? What constitutes an improvement? How many school districts define the criteria for success for an innovation prior to the implementation of that innovation? How can you separate the contribution of the innovation to the overall process of student learning?
Examples:
Wikis in Blackboard: the wiki tool we employ in District 99 provides student contribution data and provides teachers with a snapshot of who is doing what within the collaborative group. How can that improve performance? Teachers can intervene to support individuals who are contributing, and those who are not, to course-correct.
Conclusion: Today, you'll have an opportunity to interact with many talented people. What innovations will you see that have the potential to make learning come alive in your school district? Think about the 7 Factors of Stickiness-use them as a framework for evaluating and ensuring that any new learning technology