Subscribe: HLP Recent Additions
http://www.holylandphotos.org/rss/
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
altar  appia  ara pacis  ara  church  jesus  mdash  pacis altar  pacis  rome ara  rome  temple  via appia  via  view 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: HLP Recent Additions

HLP Recent Additions



The latest additions to the Holy Land Photos archive.



Published: Fri, 02 Feb 2018 00:00:01 GMT

Last Build Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2018 11:46:56 GMT

Copyright: Copyright 2018, Holy Land Photos
 



et-Tell/Bethsaida: Road, Wall, Drain

Fri, 02 Feb 18 16:43:00 GMT

(image)

View looking south along the outside of the double eastern wall of et–Tell.  In the foreground are the covering stones of a drain that leads out of the city.

In the picture, two stone walls are visible—upper right.  The one on the far right is the inner city wall and that to the left of it the outer city wall.  There is a paved street between the outer wall and the modern yellow fence that leads up to the gate of the city—where the large eucalyptus tree is visible.

The wall, street, and road date to the 9th or 8th centuries BC.




Capernaum: Synagogue Entrances

Thu, 01 Feb 18 16:19:00 GMT

(image)

View looking north at the southern entrances into the synagogue.  The three on the left enter the main hall of the synagogue while the two on the right (east) enter the eastern auxiliary room.




Arbel Cliffs: View SW

Mon, 29 Jan 18 19:35:00 GMT

(image)

View from the top of the Arbel Cliff looking southwest.  On the horizon on the left are the Horn of Hittim—a prominent marker in Lower Galilee.  On the right (north) of center the cliffs on the far side of the wadi is "Mount Nitai."  The man in the lower left is standing on the Arbel Cliffs. 

Between the Arbel Cliffs and Mount Nitai is a deep wadi (valley) thorough which many believe that the road coming from the Horns of Hittim to the Plain of Gennesaret passed.  There is a very good spring in the wadi to nourish travelers.




Spring of Harod: Modern Pools

Fri, 26 Jan 18 15:51:00 GMT

(image)

View of the recently constructed modern pools that replaced the previous swimming pools at En Harod.

For a brief description of the Spring of Harod and a Map Click Here.




Harbor: Nymphaeum Old

Fri, 26 Jan 18 03:43:00 GMT

(image)

View of the "Nymphaeum" before it was reconstructed (circa 1970's).  They use to think that it was part of the foundation of the Temple to Roma and Augustus at Caesarea Maritima.

To view the Nymphaeum after reconstruction Click Here.




Harbor: Diagram of Harbor

Thu, 25 Jan 18 18:05:00 GMT

(image)

View of a diagram of the Herodian Harbor at Caesarea Maritima.  Key to the diagram:

1.  Towers at entrance 2.  Port Authority Building
3.  Quay Warehouses 4.  Western Mole
5.  Southern Mole 6.  DrusionTower
7.  Main Basin 8.  Middle Basin
9.  Inner Harbor 10.Temple of Roma and Augustus

 




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Interior Sacrificial Procession

Mon, 27 Nov 17 17:15:00 GMT

(image)

View of the interior of the Ara Pacis.  Note the three animals that are being led to be sacrificed.  It looks like servants are bare-chested with short "kilts."  It looks like some of them may be carrying clubs or long knives.




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Interior Garlands

Mon, 27 Nov 17 17:14:00 GMT

(image)

View of the interior of the Ara Pacis.  The sidewalls of the interior are decorated with garlands and (sacrificial) bulls heads.  Below the band of palmettos is faux wood paneling.

The steps lead up to the actual place where the sacrifices were made.  On the left side of the image the north interior wall is visible—with faux wood paneling, and garlands and ox heads.




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Interior

Sat, 25 Nov 17 21:07:00 GMT

(image)

View of the interior of the Ara Pacis.

The steps lead up to the actual place where the sacrifices were made.  On the left side of the image the north interior wall is visible—with faux wood paneling, and garlands and ox heads.




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: South Side of Altar 2

Sat, 25 Nov 17 21:06:00 GMT

(image)

View of the lower portion of the south side of the Ara Pacis.

Below the meander design are beautiful flora designs attached to vines, all indicating abundance, luxury, and peace—that had been inaugurated by Augustus (r. 27 B.C to A.D. 14; = Pax Romana).




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: North Side of Altar

Sat, 25 Nov 17 20:05:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the upper north panel of the Ara Pacis.  This seems to be a procession of dignitaries processing to the dedication of the altar.

Below the meander design are beautiful flora designs attached to vines, all indicating abundance, luxury, and peace—that had been inaugurated by Augustus (r. 27 B.C to A.D. 14; = Pax Romana).




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: South Side of Altar

Sat, 25 Nov 17 20:03:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the upper south panel of the Ara Pacis.  This seems to be a procession of dignitaries processing to the dedication of the altar.  Note near the center of the procession is a child holding his father's hand.  The father, tall head–covered (like a priest), facing to the left of the image is the son–in–law of Augustus, Marcus Agrippa.  The woman on our right of the child is Agrippa's wife, Livia/Julia, daughter of Augustus, and the child is Gaius Caesar their offspring—and intended heir of Augustus.

On the left side of the image there is a partial figure with a sharp vertical break.  This figure is that of Augustus himself!

Below the meander design are beautiful flora designs attached to vines, all indicating abundance, luxury, and peace—that had been inaugurated by Augustus (r. 27 B.C to A.D. 14; = Pax Romana).




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Earth Goddess Tellus

Fri, 24 Nov 17 17:45:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the upper left rear panel of the Ara Pacis with Tellus, the earth goddess.  Note the peacefulness of the image—Augustus had established peace in the Roman Empire (= pax Romana).

The two infants look so contented in the arms of Tellus, the earth goddess.  The two semi–nude figures on the left and right of Tellus, with the billowing cloth, may represent the sky (on the left with the bird) and the sea (on the right with a tamed sea creature).  The sheep and the large ox seem very docile!




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Ara Pacis Rear

Fri, 24 Nov 17 17:44:00 GMT

(image)

View of the rear entrance of the Ara Pacis.   In the interior, the place of sacrificing is visible.  In the upper left is a register with Tellus, the earth goddess.




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Aeneas Sacrificing a Sow

Fri, 24 Nov 17 17:39:00 GMT

(image)

View of the upper right register of the front of the Ara Pacis.  This is a carving depicting the founder of Rome, Aeneas, sacrificing a sow in front of a temple—in upper left portion of the register.  Note the meander design below the register.




Rome: Ara Pacis Altar: Ara Pacis Front

Fri, 24 Nov 17 17:37:00 GMT

(image)

View of the front entrance into the Ara Pacis.  The altar is actually "U–" shaped.  In the foreground are stairs that lead up to the altar.  Inside the entrance are additional steps that lead up to the actual altar where the sacrifices were made.

Note the beautiful floral carvings in the lower decorative sections of the altar—they are symbolic of the bounty and luxury of the "era of peace" that had been inaugurated by Augustus (r. 27 B.C to A.D. 14; = Pax Romana).  In the upper right panel is a carving depicting the founder of Rome, Aeneas, sacrificing a sow.




Rome: via Appia: Church of San Nicola

Wed, 22 Nov 17 22:00:00 GMT

(image)

View of the Church of San Nicola that is located on the via Appia.  It is opposite to the Tomb of Cecilia Metella on the via Appia.  The church was built in the 14th century.

It is officially called "San Nicola a Capo di Bove."  "Capo di Bove" means "ox–head.  This is a reference to the decorative elements on the Tomb of Cecilia Metella opposite it.

The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas of Myra.




Rome: via Appia: Tomb of Cecilia Metella

Wed, 22 Nov 17 21:58:00 GMT

(image)

View of the Tomb of Cecilia Metella that is located on the via Appia.  The tomb itself is the circular white marble structure that is on a back square base—in the left side of the image.  It was constructed in the 1st century B.C.

In the 14th century the tomb was turned into a large castle.




Rome: via Appia: Footprints of Jesus?

Wed, 22 Nov 17 19:28:00 GMT

(image)

View of a copy of a stone that is said to bear two footprints of Jesus in the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.  The footprints are horizontal, but are difficult to detect. The official name of the church is Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  The original stone is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.


Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.




Rome: via Appia: Crucifixion of Peter

Wed, 22 Nov 17 19:25:00 GMT

(image)

View of the picture of Peter in the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.  Tradition has it that Peter was crucified upside down.

Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going, Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.

The official name of the church is Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  In the church is a copy of a stone on which the faithful believe are the implanted two footprints of Jesus—the original is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.

The current church was built in the 17th century.




Roman Forum East (Arch of Titus): Temple of Venus and Roma 2

Tue, 21 Nov 17 21:46:00 GMT

(image)

View looking west at the Temple of Venus and Roma from the Colosseum.  The full width of the platform that it was built upon is visible in the center of the image.  Note the 8 grated but open entrances to the under–the–platform chambers.  Note also the columns on the left (south) and right (north) sides of the platform.  Check here for a detailed view of the apse of the temple.

On the left (south) side of the image the Palatine Hill is visible and between it an the apse of the temple the top of the Arch of Titus is also visible.


This temple was built on a platform at the east end of the Roman Forum where Nero's Domus Aurea use to stand.  It was the largest temple in Rome.  It was dedicated in A.D. 135 and may have been designed by Hadrian.

These visible remains date from a rebuild of the temple by the Emperor Maxentius (r. 306–312).  It may have been the last functioning pagan temple in Rome until it was closed by Theodosius in A.D. 391.




Roman Forum East (Arch of Titus): Temple of Venus and Roma

Tue, 21 Nov 17 20:33:00 GMT

(image)

View looking west at one of the apses of the Temple of Venus and Roma.  This temple was built on a platform at the east end of the Roman Forum where Nero's Domus Aurea use to stand.  It was the largest temple in Rome.  It was dedicated in A.D. 135 and may have been designed by Hadrian.

These visible remains date from a rebuild of the temple by the Emperor Maxentius (r. 306–312).  It may have been the last functioning pagan temple in Rome until it was closed by Theodosius in A.D. 391.

Temple Of Venus And Roma, Hadrian, Maxentius, Theodosius, Roman, East, Rome, Italy, YRMFORWE25




Rome: via Appia: Domine Quo Vadis

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:16:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the exterior of the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.   Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.

The official name of the church is the "Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  In the church is a copy of a stone on which the faithful believe are implanted two footprints of Jesus—the original is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.

The current church was built in the 17th century.




Rome: via Appia: Circus of Maxentius Detail

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:09:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the west end of the Circus of Maxentius that is located on the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

Note the two large towers that are separated by green grass between them.  The area between them is where 12 chariots and horses would line up for the start of the race in the circus—some low brick remains of the starting "stalls" (carceres) are visible.

On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312). On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312).




Rome: via Appia: Circus of Maxentius

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:07:00 GMT

(image)

View of  the west end of the Circus of Maxentius that is located on the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

On the right side of the image two towers are visible—separated by green grass between them.  The area between them is where 12 chariots and horses would line up for the start of the race in the circus.

On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312).