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The latest additions to the Holy Land Photos archive.



Published: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 00:00:01 GMT

Last Build Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 17:04:10 GMT

Copyright: Copyright 2017, Holy Land Photos
 



Rome: via Appia: Church of San Nicola

Wed, 22 Nov 17 22:00:00 GMT

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View of the Church of San Nicola that is located on the via Appia.  It is opposite to the Tomb of Cecilia Metella on the via Appia.  The church was built in the 14th century.

It is officially called "San Nicola a Capo di Bove."  "Capo di Bove" means "ox–head.  This is a reference to the decorative elements on the Tomb of Cecilia Metella opposite it.

The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas of Myra.




Rome: via Appia: Tomb of Cecilia Metella

Wed, 22 Nov 17 21:58:00 GMT

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View of the Tomb of Cecilia Metella that is located on the via Appia.  The tomb itself is the circular white marble structure that is on a back square base—in the left side of the image.  It was constructed in the 1st century B.C.

In the 14th century the tomb was turned into a large castle.




Rome: via Appia: Footprints of Jesus?

Wed, 22 Nov 17 19:28:00 GMT

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View of a copy of a stone that is said to bear two footprints of Jesus in the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.  The footprints are horizontal, but are difficult to detect. The official name of the church is Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  The original stone is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.


Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.




Rome: via Appia: Crucifixion of Peter

Wed, 22 Nov 17 19:25:00 GMT

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View of the picture of Peter in the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.  Tradition has it that Peter was crucified upside down.

Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going, Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.

The official name of the church is Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  In the church is a copy of a stone on which the faithful believe are the implanted two footprints of Jesus—the original is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.

The current church was built in the 17th century.




Roman Forum East (Arch of Titus): Temple of Venus and Roma 2

Tue, 21 Nov 17 21:46:00 GMT

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View looking west at the Temple of Venus and Roma from the Colosseum.  The full width of the platform that it was built upon is visible in the center of the image.  Note the 8 grated but open entrances to the under–the–platform chambers.  Note also the columns on the left (south) and right (north) sides of the platform.  Check here for a detailed view of the apse of the temple.

On the left (south) side of the image the Palatine Hill is visible and between it an the apse of the temple the top of the Arch of Titus is also visible.


This temple was built on a platform at the east end of the Roman Forum where Nero's Domus Aurea use to stand.  It was the largest temple in Rome.  It was dedicated in A.D. 135 and may have been designed by Hadrian.

These visible remains date from a rebuild of the temple by the Emperor Maxentius (r. 306–312).  It may have been the last functioning pagan temple in Rome until it was closed by Theodosius in A.D. 391.




Roman Forum East (Arch of Titus): Temple of Venus and Roma

Tue, 21 Nov 17 20:33:00 GMT

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View looking west at one of the apses of the Temple of Venus and Roma.  This temple was built on a platform at the east end of the Roman Forum where Nero's Domus Aurea use to stand.  It was the largest temple in Rome.  It was dedicated in A.D. 135 and may have been designed by Hadrian.

These visible remains date from a rebuild of the temple by the Emperor Maxentius (r. 306–312).  It may have been the last functioning pagan temple in Rome until it was closed by Theodosius in A.D. 391.

Temple Of Venus And Roma, Hadrian, Maxentius, Theodosius, Roman, East, Rome, Italy, YRMFORWE25




Rome: via Appia: Domine Quo Vadis

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:16:00 GMT

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View of  the exterior of the Quo Vadis church that is located on the via Appia.   Tradition suggests that Peter was fleeing from persecution in Rome and that here he met Jesus who was going into the city of Rome.  Peter asked Jesus Domine Quo Vadis ("where are you going Lord?").  Jesus responded "I am going to Rome to be crucified again," and Peter was shamed into returning to Rome to martyrdom.

The official name of the church is the "Church of St. Mary in Palmis" where "palmis" refers to the footprints of Jesus.  In the church is a copy of a stone on which the faithful believe are implanted two footprints of Jesus—the original is in the nearby Basilica of San Sebastiano.

The current church was built in the 17th century.




Rome: via Appia: Circus of Maxentius Detail

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:09:00 GMT

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View of  the west end of the Circus of Maxentius that is located on the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

Note the two large towers that are separated by green grass between them.  The area between them is where 12 chariots and horses would line up for the start of the race in the circus—some low brick remains of the starting "stalls" (carceres) are visible.

On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312). On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312).




Rome: via Appia: Circus of Maxentius

Fri, 17 Nov 17 18:07:00 GMT

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View of  the west end of the Circus of Maxentius that is located on the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

On the right side of the image two towers are visible—separated by green grass between them.  The area between them is where 12 chariots and horses would line up for the start of the race in the circus.

On the left side of the image, the high plain wall is the wall that encloses the Mausoleum of Romulus—the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312).




Rome: via Appia: Mausoleum of Romulus 2

Thu, 16 Nov 17 17:41:00 GMT

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View of the courtyard that surrounds the Mausoleum of Romulus along the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

The high walls visible beyond the grass are those enclosing the area.  A more recent farm house is on the left and behind it the circular base of the Mausoleum of Romulus is visible—with an arched window.

Romulus was the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312) who died in 309.  The Temple of Romulus in the Roman Forum was built in his honor!




Rome: via Appia: Mausoleum of Romulus 1

Thu, 16 Nov 17 17:36:00 GMT

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View of a farm house along the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.

The high walls to the right, left, and behind the house outline where the Mausoleum of Romulus was located.

Romulus was the son of the Emperor Maxentius (r. A.D. 306–312) who died in 309.  The Temple of Romulus in the Roman Forum was built in his honor!




Rome: via Appia: Christian Grave Markers

Thu, 16 Nov 17 17:33:00 GMT

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Christian grave markers that were collected from the catacombs that line the via Appia.  There are many catacombs because Christians, and Jews, buried their dead ones.  They did not cremate the deceased, as did the Romans.

Lower left: doves and a chi rho symbol. Upper left: a dove with a wreath.  Center: a fish spelled out with the Greek Icthius (= Jesus, Christ, Son of God, Savior and the chi rho symbol and dove.  Upper right: the Good shepherd.  Lower right: gifts being brought to the Virgin and Child.




Rome: via Appia: Via Appia Roadbed 2

Thu, 16 Nov 17 17:31:00 GMT

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A portion of the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.  Note the curbing on both sides as well as the basalt paving stones with some cart marks.




Rome: via Appia: Via Appia Roadbed 1

Thu, 16 Nov 17 17:27:00 GMT

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A portion of the via Appia to the southeast of Rome.  Note the basalt paving stones and the antiquities that line the road.

Image courtesy of Jerry Hawkes.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: High Altar

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:56:00 GMT

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View of the High (main) Altar in the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls.  Note the ancient porphyry columns and the use of human figures on the corners of the canopy.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: South Transept Altar

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:55:00 GMT

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View of the beautiful altar made of malachite stone.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:43:00 GMT

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View looking east into the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament.  This is the only portion of the church that was not burned in the fire of 1823.  Behind the altar is a 14th century Crucifix.  On the right side of the image is life size wooden statue of Saint Paul.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: North Transept

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:41:00 GMT

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View looking north at the north transept of the church.  Note all the roundels of all the Popes from Saint Peter through Francis (the current, 2017, pope).




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: South Transept

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:39:00 GMT

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View looking south at the south transept of the church.  Note all the roundels of all the Popes from Saint Peter through Francis (the current, 2017, pope).




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Grotto (Confessio) Detail

Wed, 15 Nov 17 17:37:00 GMT

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View of the "Grotto" (Confessio) that is located below the High Altar.  Behind the grating on the center of the image is one of the sides of the sarcophagus that is said to contain the remains of Saint Paul.

Below the glass floor are rock carvings and a portion of the curved apse of an earlier church.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Grotto (Confessio)

Tue, 14 Nov 17 18:11:00 GMT

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View of the "Grotto" (Confessio) that is located below the High Altar.   From top to bottom a chain, that is said to have restrained Paul while he was under house arrest in Rome, is encased in a box.

Below that is a grating and behind that a small portion of the sarcophagus that is said to contain the remains of Saint Paul is barely visible.  Below the glass floor are rock carvings and a portion of the apse of an earlier church.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Nave

Tue, 14 Nov 17 16:44:00 GMT

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View of the central Nave looking west at the entrance to the basilica.  Above the columns surrounding the nave are roundels with mosaics of all the popes from Saint Peter to the current Pope—Francis.  There are 16 roundels that are left blank for future popes.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Apse Mosaic

Tue, 14 Nov 17 16:43:00 GMT

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View looking up at the mosaic at the top of the eastern Apse.  Although heavily reconstructed this is a relic of the old pre–fire of 1823 arch.  It was originally executed in 1220.

In the center is the ascended Christ holding the Gospels and blessing in the Greek manner.  Surrounding him are saints Peter, Andrew, Paul, and Luke.  Below the seated Christ is a gem–studded cross and angels and apostles.  In the upper left corner is the Virgin and Child, and in the upper right is Saint John blessing Pope John XXII.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Triumphal Arch

Tue, 14 Nov 17 16:41:00 GMT

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View looking east at the mosaic at the top of the Triumphal Arch.  Although heavily reconstructed this is a relic of the old pre–fire of 1823 arch.

On the top is a "grim–faced" Christ holding his hand blessing in the Greek manner.  The four winged creatures above him have "faces" that represent the four Evangelists—gospel writers.  Below them are figures representing the saint of the Apocalyse (book of Revelation).  On the lower left side of the arch is St. Paul with a sword (of the spirit/word) and to the right St. Peter holding the keys to the Kingdom of Heaven.




Saint Paul Outside the Walls: Central Nave

Tue, 14 Nov 17 01:54:00 GMT

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View looking east down the central nave of the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside of the walls.  The nave is flanked by double aisle on both the north and the south.

At the far (east) end is a triumphal arch that is a relic of the old pre–fire of 1823 that is supported by two granite columns.