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Comments on Confessions of a Science Librarian: The CS/IT job market





Updated: 2017-09-03T12:54:39.677-04:00

 



I would hope potential scientists could see a myth...

2007-10-08T10:53:00.000-04:00

I would hope potential scientists could see a myth is a myth with the data that showed that it was. If not, I am not sure that they really are very good scientist candidates anyway.

Now some will just claim that even though the current data shows that IT salaries remain very high and the job market is good today that will change over time. That at least is a prediction and more difficult to refute.

My guess is that global competition will increase and salaries may be pressured, but really I don't think there are many professions where one can hide from that likely future.

What is a wise course of action? Arm yourself with skills that can add value to organizations. And learn how to keep learning to adapt to a changing world. Those strategies seem wise to me. And understanding technology is likely to be an important key to adding value (and adapting) in the next 30 years.

So I would see a heavy dose of technology and science as a wise course of study. Frankly for many IT jobs I don't see much need for a CS degree but do see a good number of courses on technology (computer science, engineering...) and science and math (and business too) as useful for a future in IT.

The career category of my Curious Cat Science and Engineering blog discusses related ideas.



The same assumption seems to be pretty common here...

2007-10-03T08:23:00.000-04:00

The same assumption seems to be pretty common here too. I think part of the problem is that the job search experience can be quite uneven. Lots of short contract jobs, uneven pay, lots of turnover.



Regarding the "where are the CS undergrads" from t...

2007-10-02T21:37:00.000-04:00

Regarding the "where are the CS undergrads" from the first article: I can only speak for my students, but there seems to be a very pervasive attitude among them that all of the tech jobs have been outsourced. So perhaps this is why the numbers are still down. I'm not sure how we debunk this particular myth, though.