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Last Build Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 21:34:09 GMT

Copyright: Copyright 2002 Dave Bryson
 




Sun, 10 Nov 2002 21:13:08 GMT

Site moved

To the person that subscribes to my feed. Please update your link to read from my site Miceda-data





Fri, 01 Nov 2002 04:58:37 GMT

Focus problem?

Seems I've spent more time recently playing with various Blog tools (MovableType, Blosxom, PyBlosxom) than actually blogging anything!

Writing ( blogging) seems to require a sort of discipline. If you're not naturally inclined to write ( I'm not ) I think you need to make an effort to stay with it. However I think there's a benefit in staying with it if nothing more than making you think things through.





Fri, 01 Nov 2002 04:49:55 GMT

More discussion on the need for EJBs

Everywhere you look more and more people are discussing the need and appropriate use for EJBs. I just hope the info. trinkles to managers.





Fri, 04 Oct 2002 21:09:14 GMT

Friendly URLs

I think most people would agree that URLs are an important part of a web UI. If designed correctly they can be as intutitive and helpful as a label and button on the page.

One of the decisions I find myself occasionally faced with when developing a web application is whether you should always go through code to access templates, or mix it up by accessing templates or html directly when going through code doesn't really add value. For example, I may map code to urls with the extension *.action and templates to the extension *.vt.

Thinking about friendly predictable URLs I would have to lean towards always going through code. That way a user doesn't have to second guess to use .action or .vt.





Fri, 04 Oct 2002 16:32:32 GMT

Do you need EJBs? a check list

  1. Do you need support for objects distributed across Java VMs?
  2. Do you need distributed transactions?

If you answered no to both of these questions, a good database and JDBC connection pool are all you probably need.





Fri, 04 Oct 2002 15:54:19 GMT

Same as it ever was...

UML, Use cases, Agile modeling, extreme programming, Waterfall, RAD, blah, blah, blah....

Modeling and design books are like books on leadership and management. They keep saying the say stuff over and over just using different words. It's always amazed me they sell so many books on leadership and management. You can summarize most of them like this: Listen to people and be honest Yet many managers still don't get it.

Modeling and design books are much the same. Here's a couple ideas that are a few hundred years old that can probably summarize many of the $65.00 design books:

From Rene Descartes

  • The first was never to accept anything for true which I did not clearly know to be such; that is to say, carefully to avoid precipitancy and prejudice, and to comprise nothing more in my judgement than what was presented to my mind so clearly and distinctly as to exclude all ground of doubt.
  • The second, to divide each of the difficulties under examination into as many parts as possible, and as might be necessary for its adequate solution.
  • The third, to conduct my thoughts in such order that, by commencing with objects the simplest and easiest to know, I might ascend by little and little, and, as it were, step by step, to the knowledge of the more complex; assigning in thought a certain order even to those objects which in their own nature do not stand in a relation of antecedence and sequence.
  • And the last, in every case to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so general, that I might be assured that nothing was omitted.

There's no silver bullet, no chance of divine intervention, no short cuts, no $1500.00 tool that'll do it. To be truely effective, you gotta roll-up your sleeves and master the simple stuff.





Fri, 04 Oct 2002 15:23:20 GMT

Scripting Java web apps

A lot of code in a web application is devoted to glueing the presentation and business logic/data tiers together. Most of this code is dedicated to the same things: validating input, updating the database, deciding where to send the user.

One of the draws backs to using a compiled language such as Java in this scenario is the pain of code, compile, start web server, test, loop.... Seems to me that a scripting language ( jython) would be perfect as the glue between the html and backend components.

No only does the scripting language speed the development cycle but usually the scripting language is simple enough for junior programmers to use and become productive with.

Now I realize that using a scripting language in this area is not a new idea ( tcl and the AOLServer, Perl... ). But it certainly is still very uncommon in the Java web app world and IMO much needed.

More Interesting reading on the topic




Fri, 04 Oct 2002 15:01:27 GMT

Scalability, Three-Tiered Architectures, and Application Servers

This has been part of my recent reading (12 step program ) I've been doing as I make a return to focusing on the simple, basic, and sound ways of building apps. It's all to easy to get wrapped up in technology marketing hype and API overload at the point where you've forgot how well the simple stuff works.

Although this paper is a couple years old, it still has some valid points: Focus on sound enginerring principles!

Just say no to EJBs! ( at least for the majority of apps anyway)




Fri, 04 Oct 2002 14:47:43 GMT

from the Register Gosling: Microsoft's Java threat is financial, not technical




Tue, 01 Oct 2002 04:17:14 GMT

Referers log

It's amazing. Since I changed my weblog template I'm showing no ( zero ) referers on the community server. Even if I hit the site it doesn't show up in the referers.

What's up?





Tue, 24 Sep 2002 15:09:58 GMT

[rebelutionary writes: ]Bad, bad, bad name...How about this for the worst product name in the Java space? Javaanal: Java documentation analysis utility!

Brilliant marketing! Image all the late night google hits they'll get.





Tue, 24 Sep 2002 04:10:13 GMT

Blosxom

Just got finished installing it. And I could do it in less than 15 minutes! It's amazing how simple yet powerful it is.





Wed, 18 Sep 2002 17:25:18 GMT

I agree!

Charles Miller writes:
"Then, I suddenly realised. Wow, I've finally found an interesting application for Javaspaces. Create a Tuple Space. Every time you post a blog entry, you put it into the space, along with a bunch of linking objects that point to any other URL you referenced in your post. Clients could traverse the conversations in the space, ask for event notifications if a new reference is made to a post, et. al. Leasing would ensure the space culled conversations that nobody was referring to any more."

A Community Server is a TupleSpace.





Wed, 18 Sep 2002 16:20:32 GMT

What if the Radio Community Server were down for a day?

Yea, maybe I'm a little stuck on this subject, Weblog Community Servers (WCSs) and all. But there's something interesting here.

So what if the RCS were down? Today it'd probably be no real big deal. Sure, you'd miss your referer counts and would have to go somewhere else to find recent web log updates - so what. Now fast-forward a year or two. Will a WCS become an important part of the web log community? I bet it will.

To be able to do the kind of interesting things you hear people talking about concerning blogs such as: rating, ranking, comments, filtering, categorization, etc... I think you need a WCS and many of them.

A group of WCSs could add value to the stream of weblogs that might pass through it. Letting users know when updates are made, filtering and forwarding weblogs to another specialized WCS that might focus on a category by keeping weblogs related to it's interests and throwing away the rest. Or letting a community know when a java blog or single entry (that I don't usually subscribe to) has been added or updated. So I can subscribe to a subject not a specific blog. I'm sure there's much more.

But we can't do all this with one WCS, especially one tied to a vendor and product So here's what I think:

  1. A WCS will play an important part in the future of blogs
  2. A web log client should be able to connect to many WCSs at a time
  3. You must have many Weblog Community Servers available on the internet. ( imagine 1 mail server in the world )
  4. A WCS must have an open,standard, interface

Okay, I'll shutup now.