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FOSTERING THE VIRTUES OF HONOR, DUTY AND LOVE OF COUNTRY.



Updated: 2011-08-08T16:31:25-07:00

 



Goodbye, Cruel World!

2011-08-08T16:31:25-07:00

After more then five years, it's time to say goodbye to this blog. Sadly, I can no longer devote the time, energy and money it takes to keep CTT going and I am burnt out trying. I have made many...

After more then five years, it's time to say goodbye to this blog.

Sadly, I can no longer devote the time, energy and money it takes to keep CTT going and I am burnt out trying. I have made many great contacts and built some awesome friendships along the way, and I am very grateful for that. You can still find me on Twitter, Facebook and, as always, by email at CoptheTruth AT aol DOT com.

My goal initially was to devote this blog to the honor, courage and sacrifice of the heroes among us, namely our family members, friends and neighbors serving in the military, law enforcement and other first responders, most notably those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to out great nation and people.

I admittedly got a little off track when I saw the incredible injustice being done to our country by the liars, crooks and self-serving politicians in Washington, concerned only with gaining and keeping more power and money. The level of incompetence rose to new levels with the likes of Pelosi, Reid, Obama, McCain, et al, gaining ultimate power and wielding it only to benefit those who bought them their respective offices. Trying to stop these egomaniacs became a priority, but, sadly, CTT failed in that effort.

It is my belief that the most important moment in the history of our nation is nearly upon us. The 2012 election will decide what future - if any - we have, and what it will look like. If the inept, uncaring boobs in power now remain there, we are finished as a nation. The America you know, love and grew up in will be gone forever. We must defeat Obama and his Progressive, Communist-loving ilk, and we must replace them with Americans who believe in smaller government, spending within our means, securing our borders, strong family values, few entitlements and a balanced budget, whatever their party. Anything else will doom us all.

Wake up, get involved and cast an intelligent vote, people. Before it's too late.

You can still catch my opinion pieces at our new blog Left Coast Patriot. I hope that you'll stop by and say hello.

Best wishes to all, and let us never forget that, at any given moment, a soldier, sailor, Airman, Marine, Coast Guardsman, Police Officer or Firefighter is sacrificing everything - including their very lives - to protect their country, their countrymen and our way of life. May God bless you all.




'Green Beret' Killed in Afghanistan

2011-08-08T14:19:27-07:00

Captain Waid "Chip" Ramsey, 41, of Red Bay, Alabama, was killed August 4 in Paktika province, Afghanistan, when his unit was attacked with small arms fire. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Alabama...

Captain Waid "Chip" Ramsey, 41, of Red Bay, Alabama, was killed August 4 in Paktika province, Afghanistan, when his unit was attacked with small arms fire. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Alabama Army National Guard, from Birmingham, Alabama.

From Al.com:

"A good soldier," said Perry Ramsey, Waid's dad. "He was a great son and father."

Family and a commitment to service were very important to Waid, he said. His son - "he liked to fish" - joined the Army when he was 18, after graduating from high school in Red Bay. Waid went on to spend nearly 20 years in uniform as both an active-duty and Guard soldier.

[...]

"The Alabama National Guard is deeply saddened by the loss of one of our own," said the Guard's top officer, Maj. Gen. Perry G. Smith, in a statement. "Our sincerest condolences go out to the family during this time of grief. We are praying for Captain Ramsey's family, friends and all the soldiers of the 20th Special Forces Group who have lost a brother-in-arms."

Captain Waid is survived by his wife, Mary, and their children, Bradley Waid, 7, and Megan Alexandria, who turns 5 years old today.

All the way, indeed. Rest in peace, sir.




Twelve Rangers Inducted to Hall of Fame

2011-07-28T18:56:08-07:00

Twelve Army Rangers were inducted into the Ranger Hall of Fame during the 19th annual induction ceremony Wednesday. Among the twelve was my former Battalion Commander Colonel Keith Nightingale, one of the finest men I've even known. It was one...

Twelve Army Rangers were inducted into the Ranger Hall of Fame during the 19th annual induction ceremony Wednesday.

Among the twelve was my former Battalion Commander Colonel Keith Nightingale, one of the finest men I've even known. It was one of the great honors of my life to have served in his command.

This years inductees are:

• Eldon A. Bargewell, Eufaula, Ala.

• Donald C. Bowman, Columbus

• Gary E. Dolan, Farmingdale, N.Y.

• Steven R. England, Fayetteville, N.C.

• Sean T. Kelly, Phoenixville, Pa.

• Paul R. Longgrear, Pine Mountain, Ga.

• Keith M. Nightingale, Ojai, Calif.

• Luis C. Palacios, Dahlonega, Ga.

• Jim R. Pickering, Columbus

• Bonifacio M. Romo, Columbus

• Robert E. Spencer, Columbus

• Stanley Wawrzyniak, Newport, N.C.

Congratulations, Rangers!



'Green Berets' Awarded Croix De La Valeur Miltaire

2011-07-28T18:45:51-07:00

Six Special Forces Troopers were recently awarded the Croix de la Valeur Militaire (French Cross of Military Valor) - roughly equivalent to the Silver Star - for their actions in Afghanistan in 2009. From Army.mil: “I am deeply honored to...

Six Special Forces Troopers were recently awarded the Croix de la Valeur Militaire (French Cross of Military Valor) - roughly equivalent to the Silver Star - for their actions in Afghanistan in 2009.

From Army.mil:

“I am deeply honored to pay tribute to six most outstanding American Soldiers from the United States Army and the Army National Guard who distinguished themselves while fighting the Taliban and Al Qaida elements in Afghanistan,” said French Ambassador François Delattre.

“Through their outstanding bravery and engagement in combat, they fought at the risk of their own lives to assist French Soldiers, their brothers in arms, who experienced a barrage of fire from the enemy.”

Congratualtions to Active-duty Army Maj. Richard Nessel of the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), and Army National Guard Capt. Thomas Harper, Master Sgt. David Nuemer, Sgt. 1st Class Ryan Ahern, Staff Sgt. Casey Roberts and Sgt. Ryan Meister.

Well-earned, indeed.




Living Marine to be Awarded Medal of Honor

2011-07-21T22:25:52-07:00

Corporal Dakota Meyer, formerly of the United States Marine Corps, will be the first living Marine since the Vietnam War to receive the Medal of Honor, for his actions in Afghanistan nearly three years ago. From Military.com: Meyer, who left...

Corporal Dakota Meyer, formerly of the United States Marine Corps, will be the first living Marine since the Vietnam War to receive the Medal of Honor, for his actions in Afghanistan nearly three years ago.

From Military.com:

Meyer, who left the Marine Corps in June 2010, was nominated for the medal after risking his life to race into the kill zone of a firefight to find three missing Marines and a Navy corpsman, Marine Corps Times reported earlier today after confirming the Leatherneck report.

The four men were already dead and stripped of their gear and equipment, according to the report. Along with friendly Afghan soldiers Meyer got the bodies away from the combat area where they could be flown out.

Two other Marines involved in the skirmish were recently awarded the Navy Cross.

Bravo Zulu, Marine!




'Green Beret' Killed in Afghanistan

2011-07-18T14:58:13-07:00

Staff Sergeant Wyatt A. Goldsmith, 28, of Colville, Washington, was killed July 15 when enemy forces attacked his unit with rocket-propelled grenade fire in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned as a Special Forces Medical Sergeant to Company A, 3rd...

Staff Sergeant Wyatt A. Goldsmith, 28, of Colville, Washington, was killed July 15 when enemy forces attacked his unit with rocket-propelled grenade fire in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned as a Special Forces Medical Sergeant to Company A, 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington.

SSgt Goldsmith's military education includes the Special Forces Medical Sergeant Course, Military Freefall Parachutist Course, Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Course, Basic Airborne Course and the Warrior Leader Course. His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device, Purple Heart, Parachutist Badge, Military Freefall Parachutist Badge, Special Forces Tab and CIB.

He is survived by his parents John and Lorie Goldsmith of Colville, Washington, and his sister Nicole.

Godspeed, Trooper.




Happy Birthday, America!

2011-07-04T16:59:31-07:00

General Washington Addressing the Troops For some time now, my friends, I have wanted to share with you the understanding that has come to me about the war that we are fighting with the British. This war did not begin...General Washington Addressing the Troops For some time now, my friends,I have wanted to share with you the understanding that has come to me about the war that we are fighting with the British. This war did not begin with the sallying forth of the first shots from the muskets of the British.Nor will it be won by the triumph of will, vigor,and persistent courage by thosewho have less support to back them,but a mightier force of destiny. No, this war will only be won when all nationswho seek to conquer, or who hold sway overthe rights of others to exist in freedom, shall perish, and when all nations discover that the one true interest that holds them together is a common one - an interest that lies in the freedomand self-determination of each. You, who have been fighting so valiantly during this battle for which so many have given their lives, need know that after victory is won and this fight is over, there will come a time of peace and ofbeing able to retreat to our homes and farmsto enjoy the fruits of liberty. But after this time shall come another time of war, and another time of travail for this nation that we are so courageously building. For the time has not yet come when all men can lay down their arms and proceed through life as brothers. This will be, some day, in the scheme of Divine Providence, but it is not now, and it is not within the foreseeable future. Therefore, what we do here today, what we give here today, we do and give in order to stave off the destruction that would be brought about by forces seeking to dismantle our present social structure and free government. We cannot allow this to happen. For we, as a free people, must defend our right to exist as such. We must not allow tyranny to prevail or the fear of reprisals to dissuade us from our calling. Nevertheless, this war, when it ends, will not end war. It will be one in a series of other warsthat this nation-to-be will fight. Yet in the end, after much travail and much pain and suffering,this nation shall finally be free to live in peace, and shall be a representative of peaceto a world that is tired of war that has come, finally, to a place of being able to live in harmony. May that day come soon, my friends, and may we all be enabled to return to our homes quickly, to resume life in its daily quiet joys and in its daily moments of ease and tranquility. Happy Fourth of July to you all. And please remember that, as we enjoy the company of friends and family, the simple pleasure of good food and the comfort of our backyards, beaches and parks, that brave Americans are standing the watch for freedom around the world. Let us never forget their sacrifice and courage. [...]



82nd Airborne Trooper Killed in Afghanistan

2011-06-30T22:22:15-07:00

Staff Sergeant Donald V. Stacy, 23, of Avondale, Arizona, was killed June 28 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, when the enemy attacked his unit with an IED. He was assigned as a Squad Leader to Company B, 1st Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry...

(image) Staff Sergeant Donald V. Stacy, 23, of Avondale, Arizona, was killed June 28 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, when the enemy attacked his unit with an IED. He was assigned as a Squad Leader to Company B, 1st Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

"I chose Staff Sgt. Donald Stacy and his squad to deploy to Afghanistan because he was a strong and confident leader who was loved and respected by those he led," said Command Sgt. Maj. Richard Lopez, the battalion's command sergeant major. "His final actions saved the lives of many."

[...]

"(Staff Sgt.) Stacy's devotion to his fellow paratroopers, and his dedication to mission accomplishment set him apart from his peers," said Capt. Jeff Wismann, the battalion's rear detachment commander. "He was both a phenomenal leader and a genuine friend, and he will truly be missed."

SSG Stacy had deployed twice to Iraq, but thgis was his first deployment to Afghanistan. His awards and deocrations include the Parachutist Badge, the CIB, the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart.

He is survived by his mother, Felicia Escobedo of Avondale. All the way, brother.

Note: Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army




82nd Airborne Trooper Killed in Training Jump

2011-06-28T17:36:52-07:00

Staff Sergeant Jamal Clay, 25, of Elida, Ohio, assigned as a vehicle recovery supervisor with Company G, 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd, Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed Saturday night during a combat training excercise...

Staff Sergeant Jamal Clay, 25, of Elida, Ohio, assigned as a vehicle recovery supervisor with Company G, 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd, Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed Saturday night during a combat training excercise when his parachute malfunctioned and failed to open. Clay fell some 800 feet to his death and was pronouned dead at the scene.

"Staff Sergeant Jamal Clay was the best paratrooper in the company. Everybody wanted to be like him," said Capt. Luke Bird, Clay's company commander. "He was a natural leader and a skilled mechanic who made the whole battalion better."

[...]

"Staff Sergeant Jamal Clay was a tremendous airborne leader and role model for Paratroopers. His personal discipline, high standards, and genuine teamwork set the example for the rest of the battalion," said Lt. Col. John Rafferty, commander of 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment. "His contributions to the battalion, during two combat deployments to Iraq and one Global Response Force mission cycle, have been enormous."

SSG Clay is survived by his wife, Jasmine Clay, and two children, Jamier Brown, 6, and Janye McKenzie, 2.

All the way, brother.




Custer's Last Stand

2011-06-25T10:55:27-07:00

135 years ago today, some 270 officers and enlisted men of the 7th Cavalry met their fate at the Little Bighorn. This post originally appeared at CTT in 2008. Custer at the Little Bighorn On June 25, 1876, five understrengthed...135 years ago today, some 270 officers and enlisted men of the 7th Cavalry met their fate at the Little Bighorn. This post originally appeared at CTT in 2008. Custer at the Little Bighorn On June 25, 1876, five understrengthed companies of the Seventh Cavalry, lead by Br.Gen. George A. Custer, rode into a valley near the Little Bighorn River, Montana, in search of "hostile" Indians. Early that morning, scouts reported that they could see a large camp of Indians and plans were made to assault the village the following day. However, signs of Custer's column had been observed by a small party of Indians (who ironically failed to report the presence of the cavalry column), so Custer and his Troopers went immediately into the attack. Custer sent one battalion, lead by Major Marcus Reno, in a frontal assault to provoke the Indians into an engagement. He sent a second battalion, lead by Capt. Fredrick Benteen, to scout and attack any Indians fleeing the main engagement. A smaller force of about 140 men was assigned to escort the regiment's pack train. The "hostiles" consisted of approximately fifteen hundred warriors, although estimates vary widely. Comprised of Arapaho, Lakota and Northern Cheyenne, they were lead by the formidable Chiefs Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Gall. They were defending their homes, families and their very existence. The Seventh was doomed from the start. The attack by Reno's Battalion stalled when they were confronted by large numbers of Indians, both mounted and dismounted. Reno rapidly lost control of both himself and his unit, and his men took cover in a stand of timber. After taking several casualties, Reno lead the disorganized flight to a nearby hilltop, leaving many of his men behind. If not for the well executed rearguard hastily organized by Lt. Edward Godfrey, Reno's Battalion, too, would have been wiped out. Benteen's Battalion arrived and reinforced Reno's men, despite receiving written orders to join Custer with the pack train. While Reno drank whiskey and cowered near the command post, Benteen conducted a skillful defense of the hilltop for the better part of a day and a half, repelling repeated Indian attacks. Capt. Thomas Weir lead his company, against the orders of the now in-command Benteen, towards Custer's position, but was turned back by the sheer number of Indians surrounding both Custer and Reno/Benteen. His was the only attempt to go to the aid of Custer and his surrounded command, which perished less than a mile away. The two battalions remained on the bluff until they were reinforced by another column of cavalry. It was only then that they learned of Custer's fate. Custer, however, encountered overwhelming numbers of Indians and was rapidly surrounded. He apparently divided his battalion into three companies, the others being lead by Capts. Yates and Keogh. Yates' company feinted toward the village, but was cut off and overwhelmed, the survivors rejoining Custer atop a nearby hill. Keogh apparently dismounted his company to fight a rearguard, while Custer pushed further up the ridge. The resulting chaos lead to several "last stands' with command breaking down completely. Several troopers took their own lives, fearing torture if they were taken prisoner. Keogh's company was rapidly overwhelmed and wiped out, and Custer's command, gathered on a nearby hilltop, was also quickly annihilated. There were no survivors. The Seventh Cavalry lost 16 officers, 242 troopers and 10 civilian scouts, or approximately 52% of their unit. Another 60 men from Reno's fight were wounded. Although no records exist, it [...]