Subscribe: Comments on Technical Revenue: Howto Pass a Silicon Valley Software Engineering I...
http://paultyma.blogspot.com/feeds/5691934383891403277/comments/default
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
article  blog  business  code  company  data structures  data  day  don  google  interview  job  nice  paul  people  person  time 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments on Technical Revenue: Howto Pass a Silicon Valley Software Engineering I...

Comments on Paul Tyma: Howto Pass a Silicon Valley Software Engineering Interview





Updated: 2017-10-26T14:35:29.847-07:00

 



You are awesome and that is a cool post. I love th...

2014-12-12T05:06:41.581-08:00

You are awesome and that is a cool post. I love the language expression and to be honest, I was in those shoes except that i went for my dream Job first (An Interview at thoughtworks) and blew it bad. Thanx for the heads up



Nice one Paul, really helped me as I was just look...

2013-05-15T21:51:23.357-07:00

Nice one Paul, really helped me as I was just looking for a new software job after a long time in the same job, and didn't know what to expect.

Also found a good one here about interview prep work: preparing for a software interview.



Hi Paul, Usually I do not read article on blogs, b...

2013-03-14T06:55:20.613-07:00

Hi Paul,
Usually I do not read article on blogs, but I would like to say that this write-up very pressured me to check out and do it! Your writing taste has been surprised me. Thank you, quite nice article.


Merlen Hogg
service



I think it's sad how every interview article d...

2011-06-29T12:05:52.857-07:00

I think it's sad how every interview article describes how its up to the interviewEE to convince the interviewER that he/she is great.

Its sad because that's the general attitude of HR people and why I think all HR people should be fired. HR people are like union workers. They don't care about finding a good person. They just want to be entertained and paid for it too.

In reality its a two way street, but you talk about the arrogance of interviewEEs and say nothing of the arrogance of interviewERs.



Now I know what to answer politely to such an inte...

2011-05-06T12:42:14.609-07:00

Now I know what to answer politely to such an interviewer: "I have never had any negative experience" LOL ;-)
Most important: say it slowly... with serious face... and with LOL at the end. Remember, only 7-12% of communication is passed by words; the rest is voice tone, body language.
For sure, if they like you (and they want you) they will ask more detailed question. Don't waste time!



martti vh, maybe you need to understand the differ...

2011-05-04T07:34:14.702-07:00

martti vh, maybe you need to understand the difference between being critical versus being negative? The distinction is clear and comes through in an interview.

That said, in my interviews I ask people to give me examples where they had a negative experience and how they handled it. If they tell me they never had one, that raises a red flag. The successful interviewee will be critical (not negative) in their answer - not only with respect to the situation, but in how they may have handled it better.



You don't make working at Google sound like fu...

2011-05-03T00:01:21.248-07:00

You don't make working at Google sound like fun at all. :-/



Good to know how to go for interview

2011-05-02T23:53:50.721-07:00

Good to know how to go for interview



This kind of interview suits for start ups and pro...

2011-05-02T23:36:37.601-07:00

This kind of interview suits for start ups and product company but not service based company in INDIA.recently i worked with start up company where work environment is quiet different compare to service base company which i never expected. I have done reasonably good in the interview process but coming to real work i failed so lost my job with in a month.Shall i blame myself for not doing well or my boss who took interview? because his inability to evaluate me in the interview process....



Mom is fast because what Mom is doing isn't so...

2011-05-02T23:22:05.876-07:00

Mom is fast because what Mom is doing isn't sorting. A sorting algorithm returns ONE sorted list...



I don't give a shit how smart you are or cleve...

2011-05-02T23:11:44.286-07:00

I don't give a shit how smart you are or clever you are. What I care about when I'm hiring developers is can you deliver the features in my product road map or not? And by when? That's the only thing that matters.

Your criteria for evaluating reeks of intellectual snobbery and is completely oblivious to what matters to the business. The ability to get shit done when it needs to be done, giving the company tools it needs to make moree money, these are the things that matter.

Making people solve bullshit CS problems does not address the problems of the business. It just makes you feel smarter than the other person when they can't solve it, or gives you some circle-jerk satisfaction when they can. It's a waste of time for most business software developer positions and rarely provide little insight to a person's real-world problem solving ability.

And who gives a shit if the developer is passionate? Passion is highly overrated. Give me someone productive over someone who's passionate any day of the week. If they are one in the same, great, but passion is bullshit.

Knowing APIs is important. They help you get things done faster. The faster you get shit done, the better off the business is going to be. The more APIs you know, the more things you can get done faster. Is knowing APIs impressive from a nerd point of view? Maybe not. But to a business, that knowledge is valuable.

My point is this. You completely ignore what the business actually needs to be successful in your criteria, but rather focus on hiring people you want to work with. That's a huge mistake and irresponsible on your part.

If I interviewed you and you came in talking some bullshit about how you once sorted a massive collection of objects in X ms, I'd tell you to get the fuck out of my office unless you can tell me how you made your last company more money by doing it.



This is cool...

2011-05-02T21:13:50.114-07:00

This is cool...



I wanted to go into the parts of this article a no...

2011-05-02T19:00:00.072-07:00

I wanted to go into the parts of this article a non-java dev interviewing for a non-java job should ignore... but they already know.



nice quote: if you are the smartest person at wher...

2011-05-02T18:29:00.923-07:00

nice quote:
if you are the smartest person at where you work - QUIT

fires me up to apply in-a billion dollar system engineering company that builds interesting products like google... wow... i thought it is only for the Ph.D guys.

i wish all the HR team in our country got a part of your ideas.



Josh Bloch, Matt Austern, Guido van Rossum, or Ken...

2010-11-19T17:32:58.014-08:00

Josh Bloch, Matt Austern, Guido van Rossum, or Ken Thompson isn't going to interview you for an engineer position, period.



Great post. It's really useful for anyone look...

2010-06-30T10:14:28.894-07:00

Great post. It's really useful for anyone looking for a Software Engineering opportunity, even for a new guy like me or even for an experienced developer. So Useful tips. Thanks a lot.



I really like your blog. I have been reading it fo...

2010-06-07T02:25:49.657-07:00

I really like your blog. I have been reading it for some time and i am going to add it to my RSS Feed.



I really like your article, Paul, 3 years later it...

2010-05-15T13:42:47.550-07:00

I really like your article, Paul, 3 years later it still resonates. I've decided, working in Silicon Valley for 15+ years, that there are two kinds of interviewers: they want "rock stars" or they want "employees". The rock stars are what you call "crackshot" and can invent a new data structure. Employees- more practical, a bit more pragmatic, as the earlier commenter said, they may turn in long verbose code but it works and has less bugs.

I also have to admit I really dislike academic questions. This isn't a quiz in college, this is real life, where sadly there are very few isolated instances of "a million students with grades". I can say the moments I've run into those situations, I'm delighted and eager to write an algorithm. As one successful hiring manager said- "I want someone who gets stuff done." Vs. the pretty code.



Gooood stuff

2010-03-14T20:11:07.036-07:00

Gooood stuff



I am trying to post second time, I believe it is i...

2010-02-05T08:12:21.812-08:00

I am trying to post second time, I believe it is important...
I recently found excellent post http://blog.notdot.net/2007/4/Damn-Cool-Algorithms-Part-1-BK-Trees
(another Googler); I was inspired, thinking all night about this simplest thing, next day I contributed important code to Apache Lucene (full-text indexing service). It is BK-Tree structure, it allows "quick-find" similarity using distance (spellchecker, etc.)
Even at Google, it took 34 years to find it (probably Google employees spend some time in university libraries?)

I think smart (really smart!) guys could do it... just reinventing the wheel without asking for applauds and without trying to Google it, and without trying to patent it.

Of course such companies as Google need developers who can write custom rt.jar! (such as Joshua Bloch?)

For instance, in "crawler-like" applications we can't use java.net.URL class because it is synchronized.

About job interviews... Good luck all! I am not looking for permanent job.
Most developers are forced to focus on implementing "business use cases" without thinking of String class bottlenecks for specific "robot use case". Others know nothing but something specific, like ja.io internals...



Recently I was lucky to find BLOG of Nick Johnson ...

2010-02-03T12:54:12.666-08:00

Recently I was lucky to find BLOG of Nick Johnson (Google):
http://blog.notdot.net/2007/4/Damn-Cool-Algorithms-Part-1-BK-Trees

I spent a night thinking... next day I implemented algo which boosted performance of Apache Lucene (and SOLR) 20x times ("Fuzzy Search").

Nice!



Dave - I agree with your sentiment that my wordin...

2010-02-03T12:47:24.935-08:00

Dave -

I agree with your sentiment that my wording was a bit snooty. But I still agree with the underlying principle.

That is, programming is data structures. I'm by no means thinking you are or even should be writing your own hashtable - but even a few levels above that you are (or at least I am) thinking about how data is internally stored and how it interacts.

Immediately post-google I was CTO at a mortgage start-up. I'm hard pressed to think of something farther from writing hashtables. And it was indeed often a "glue API #1 to API #2" type environment.

But even then, there were day to day instances of considering the performance and size constraints of dealing with the data. (And surprisingly, I did have to develop one highly combinatorial algorithm to do "reverse mortgage qualification" - that is find all permutations of financial changes a user could do to qualify for a given rate).

And, I will point out that the article was purposely titled to be for Silicon Valley.

I've interviewed at many places in Silicon Valley - and I'm simply recounting my personal experience.

And to add to the article and to augment the sentence you pointed out, saying something like "I don't remember all that stuff I learned in school" should at a minimum be said in a more positive way.



"I perpetually hear developers tell me that t...

2010-01-31T19:18:28.165-08:00

"I perpetually hear developers tell me that they learned that stuff in school but now forgot it. Personally, I wonder what the hell they have been coding?"

I didn't know whether to laugh or cry when i read this. Do you honestly think every developer is writing data structures? Most solutions which require data structures can be easily solved by existing open-source or publicly available solutions or even wrapped in the framework you're working with. Not a heck of a lot of companies are providing gigantic search engines serving hundreds of millions of users per day, and the need for a specifically-designed data structure is very low. Why reinvent the code when it's readily available and tested, especially when you're on a tight deadline?

I do realize that this an important skill to have and it is a tremendous benefit at Google. It most definitely had to be emphasized in your article. However, you didn't have to sound like a God-like Google genius and degrade everyone who is beneath you by saying that whatever you do equates to nothing if you don't write data structures. That's like saying "If you don't code in NotePad you're really not a programmer."

Otherwise, this was an interesting read.



I have been coding for over 20 years in many diffe...

2008-11-25T00:30:00.000-08:00

I have been coding for over 20 years in many different languages. My code works and is delivered on time. The efficient compact and elegant code frequently contains bugs and comes in late. My sloppy redundant code works on time. Do I need to change? As far as Sorting. I would implement Comparable and use Collections.sort not really caring what log n would be.



I see a lot of attitude in the post. What have the...

2008-08-04T18:22:00.000-07:00

I see a lot of attitude in the post. What have they been doing since college if they don't remember data structures and algorithms? They have been coding solving all other problems that doesn't necessarily involve algorithm analysis. Programmers of that kind are also on high demand. I have worked for a big company and has great technology and in the past decade a need for doing algorithm analysis hardly ever came up. I am not a junkie in that company, have a great reputation, I am seen as a problem solver, highly productive and overall a valuable person in the teams I've worked with.