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Comments on: Anti-China Propaganda Orgy



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By: Ryan Baker

Tue, 28 Aug 2007 04:00:09 +0000

In general I agree with your sentiments that the fear mongering over toys is at the least, significantly out of proportion. I haven't studied the issue far enough to say it's baseless, chances are there are risks, and they've been blown up due to media motivation (fear sells), and a dose of anti-China sentiment. One thing I'll disagree with you on is that China's threat to the United States is vastly overrated. China has made a great deal of economic progress and will continue to. While it has every right to this accomplishment, it does come with a degree of risk to the rest of the world. On one hand, you have the environmental concerns, which are real regardless of how deplorable American standards of conduct are. The type of fear generated by the media won't help these concerns as it stimulates desires to attempt to put the genie back in the bottle, an impossible task, as well as exceptionally selfish. Concern which encouraged the United States to realize the value in leading by example, being able to negotiate pollution controls from the moral high-ground (or at least less low) would be far more appropriate. China's economy and consumers appear to be emulating Americans more than any other model, so a better example could have far reaching impacts that don't require threats, concessions or turning a blind eye to the problems unique to China. Those problems are the second form of risk. China has made great progress and has recently been administered in a rational, if still overly firm manner. But the nature of the governmental process still carries great concern because there is little reason for confidence in its ability to prevent a future Mao, Stalin or other such undesirable from gaining control and replacing rationality with irrationality. With the new found economic power and derived powers this risk is quite grave. As grave as it is, there's little I can see to do about it. We hardly understand the government in any fashion that even if we wanted to we could reliably give it stabilizing support, or somehow block the rise of a irrational leader. Blind finagling is more likely to do harm than good. Military action before/after/ever is pretty much an insane thought. At the moment our best hope appears to be to put faith that the people of China will in time use their new found relative economic prosperity to progressively, peacefully and orderly take control of their nation and safeguard its power from the clutches of an irrational leader forever.