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The Hand That Rocks the Cradle Rocks the Vote



Updated: 2012-01-26T09:38:29-08:00

 



Come On Over to Our New Pad, MOMocrats.com

2012-01-26T09:39:04-08:00

Hi! If you've come to us from the Washington Post article that mentions PunditMom (yay! also a MOMocrat and running the 2012 election coverage at iVillage) and the MOMocrats, you need to read us at our new site! Go to...

Hi! If you've come to us from the Washington Post article that mentions PunditMom (yay! also a MOMocrat and running the 2012 election coverage at iVillage) and the MOMocrats, you need to read us at our new site! Go to MOMocrats.com and you'll see microblogs of important stories as well as longer pieces featured in the the image slider front and center. Or, come listen to our weekly podcasts, 9 am PT/ noon ET every Wednesday morning.

Check out our action campaigns and participate in our Q&A Ask a MOMocrat series!

Find us here on Twitter

Find us here on Facebook

Cheers!




Digital Bootstraps for Analog Problems -- A Reply to Gene Marks' "If I Were A Poor Black Kid"

2011-12-22T02:58:46-08:00

A truly clueless if well-intentioned column by Gene Marks titled “If I Were A Poor Black Kid” in Forbes magazine is getting righteously ripped from journalists all around the web. They’re correctly pointing out how bereft Marks’ column is of...

(image) A truly clueless if well-intentioned column by Gene Marks titled “If I Were A Poor Black Kid” in Forbes magazine is getting righteously ripped from journalists all around the web. They’re correctly pointing out how bereft Marks’ column is of history, research, practical awareness, racial sensitivity, or the sheer realities of hunger or even homelessness that low-income children face. Marks seems to suggest that kids from impoverished backgrounds – all too many of whom are African American – can simply access computers and lift themselves up by their digital bootstraps to use free websites and enter elite prep schools or colleges. Maybe a handful of motivated kids will manage a heroic feat like that despite all the odds, but is this going to work for the majority of poor kids?

--> Read the rest of this post here, at K12NewsNetwork.com.

Cynthia Liu is founder of the grassroots education news site K12NewsNetwork.com, which empowers parents, educators, and students to report on important events at their local neighborhood schools and provides tools for maximum civic engagement in support of public education. This piece originally appeared in Technorati.





2011-12-19T14:37:04-08:00

Statement from Secretary Sebelius on becoming the new Chair of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness Yesterday, I was pleased to take on the role of Chair of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness. I look forward to building on...

Statement from Secretary Sebelius on becoming the new Chair of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness

Yesterday, I was pleased to take on the role of Chair of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness. I look forward to building on the hard work of this year’s Chair, Secretary Solis, whose accomplishments include: developing a plan to increase access to mainstream benefits and launching Opening Doors-the nation’s first-ever comprehensive strategic plan to prevent and end homelessness.

The implementation of Opening Doors over the last year has given our federal agencies an opportunity to work together on an issue we all care about. Each member of the Council brings a unique approach to this problem and through this collaboration we’re laying the groundwork for future successes with better data collection, better reporting, and better use of mainstream resources. By engaging states and local communities in the plan’s goals and strategies, we’re making sure everyone is in agreement as we move forward.

While I’m proud to say we are making progress, homelessness remains a serious issue and there is more work to do. As I take on the role of Chair for the year ahead, I am looking forward to building on our current foundation as we work to end homelessness altogether. In these tough economic times, continued cross-agency collaboration is more important than ever to help those who are homeless.

Source: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2011pres/12/20111214a.html




Pursuit of Happiness Hour: Holiday Edition

2011-12-16T12:15:12-08:00

The government will not shut down -- hurray! And the Most Wonderful Time of the Year is here -- hurray! Both are cause to celebrate (or something). Congress may like to hoist a $1 trillion-plus catchall budget bill, but here...

(image) The government will not shut down -- hurray! And the Most Wonderful Time of the Year is here -- hurray! Both are cause to celebrate (or something). Congress may like to hoist a $1 trillion-plus catchall budget bill, but here at MOMocrats for special occasions we like to hoist a very classy martini or glass of wine or tankard of ale or...you get the picture.

Today's Pursuit of Happiness Hour suggests a very tasty martini:

Danish Christmas Cookie Martini

one shot Vanilla vodka

half shot DiSaronno

shot (or so) of Ginger Ale to taste

It's best to mix this with chilled ingredients versus shaking with ice, but in the event you haven't got them chilled, shake briefly and gently with ice and serve only slightly chilled versus cold.

Pour into chilled martini glass.

If you want to get really fancy, rim the martini glass with powdered sugar.




Mom’s Clean Air Force Twitter Party

2011-12-12T21:44:33-08:00

Thursday December 15th our friends at Clever Girls Collective will be hosting an historic twitter chat sponsored by the women at Mom’s Clean Air Force featuring EPA administrator Lisa P Jackson. This is an amazing opportunity for MOMocrats readers to...Thursday December 15th our friends at Clever Girls Collective will be hosting an historic twitter chat sponsored by the women at Mom’s Clean Air Force featuring EPA administrator Lisa P Jackson. This is an amazing opportunity for MOMocrats readers to actually ask first questions about one of the issues that effects all of us, air quality. Currently, there are no national limits on the amount of mercury and other toxic air pollution released from power plant smokestacks. The toxic air pollutants from the coal and oil fired plants have numerous and serious health effects, especially on children. Research has shown that Mercury harm’s children's developing brains, including effects on memory, attention, language, and fine motor and visual spatial skills. The other toxic metals found such as arsenic, chromium and nickel are known to cause cancer. Not to mention the damage Mercury and many of the other toxic pollutants causes our nation's lakes, streams, and fish. This is just a handful of the reasons why the EPA’s proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule will have a huge impact on our health, the air, the economy and even jobs. The EPA estimates the value of the improvements to health alone total $59 billion to $140 billion by 2016 by preventing thousands of premature deaths and tens of thousands of heart attacks, bronchitis cases and asthma attacks. Meeting the standards created by the rule would also create new jobs such as building, installing and operating the equipment to reduce the harmful emissions of mercury and other toxics. Got questions? Well join the Clever Girls Collective community Q & A session with Administrator Jackson where you can get your air quality-related questions by her! They’ll also be discussing clean air—how pollution has affected you and your family sharing tips for ways you can help ensure we leave a legacy of cleaner air to future generations. They’ll also be offering prizes throughout the hour — including Moms Clean Air Force prize packs and gifts. Moms Clean Air Force Twitter Event ft. EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson on Thursday, Dec 15 at 12pm PT/3pm on Twitter! Use the Tweetgrid here: http://bit.ly/uJeZ26 Follow: @momsCAF, @lisapjackson, @clevergirlscoll—and hashtag #momsCAF RSVP here to let us know you’re joining the event Please spread the word with your networks by tweeting this out: Join us! Moms Clean Air Force Twitter Event w/ EPA Admin @lisapjackson! 12/15 @ 12 P/ 3 ET! Fab prizes! #momsCAF RSVP http://bit.ly/mcafrsvp This is a sponsored MOMocrats post written as part of the Clever Girls Collective campaign for greater awareness of Mom's Clean Air Force.         [...]



The MOMocrats Discuss Plan B: Why Did HHS Overrule the FDA’s Recommendation to Offer Plan B Emergency Contraceptive as OTC?

2011-12-12T14:52:15-08:00

It all started with a smart, heated post cross-posted to the MOMocrats from Advocates for Youth (AFY), lambasting the Obama administration and the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ decision to override the FDA’s recommendation to offer Plan B as an over-the-counter drug. Plan B, of course, is known as the “day-after” pill, preventing the implantation of a fertilized egg in the womb, much as can happen randomly in any woman’s cycle without influence by any medicines. In backchannel emails, some of the MOMocrats weighed in.It all started with a smart, heated post cross-posted to the MOMocrats from Advocates for Youth (AFY), lambasting the Obama administration and the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ decision to override the FDA’s recommendation to offer Plan B as an over-the-counter drug. Plan B, of course, is known as the “day-after” pill, preventing the implantation of a fertilized egg in the womb, much as can happen randomly in any woman’s cycle without influence by any medicines.In backchannel emails, we each weighed in.Glennia: I'm all done making excuses for Obama. I can't even begin to describe my disappointment with Sebelius right now. ...I would have written something, but Kate said it all [in the Plan B post on MOMocrats], as far as I'm concerned.Julie: This is a lot of how I feel too. But then again, I'm the one who kept saying he was a lot more conservative than gossip had him. I was worried about a lot of issues. Still this stunned me. Et tu Brute and Brutette?Donna (SoCalMom): As for Obama -- as upset as this decision makes me, I do feel that by becoming President at this time in our country's history, he simply can never win with us -- let alone the vast right wing conspiracy that is making it impossible to do even the simplest things. Every tiny little victory is won with the greatest effort -- just look at how impossible the GOP has made it to get the Federal government fully staffed (or the CFPB, which Slate said they are "nullifying" by refusing to even vote on Cordray). I think it's correct for those of us on the left to point out bad policy decisions -- but we also need to strengthen our support more than ever. 2012 is going to be an epic fight on every level of government and we need to be vigilant against all the misinformation the Fox and CNN machine and superPACs are going to throw at us. MOMocrats is filling a real vacuum by disseminating facts that are going to be drowned out by all the right wing noise.I am reserving my disgust for the religious zealots that believe in freedom, so long as you're an evangelical Christian with a trust fund (everyone else is bupkis).Glennia: Donna, for the most part, I agree that Obama needs to win 2012 election, but what kind of choice is that, really?  All that he and Sebelius had to do was let the FDA do its job. No HHS Secretary has ever overturned an FDA decision, so why not just let it ride and let the zealots do the dirty work?  I think that this may have a chilling effect on future decisions that might benefit women’s health.I'm not giving money to Obama or fundraising for him this time. Sorry, I just can't do it. I'll vote for him, but any funds I have will go toward down-ticket women and advocacy groups.  I will vote for him, but that's it.I haven't had much to say about politics lately because I am disgusted by the whole scene. I can't watch or listen to anyone from either party anymore. Donna: I think that's a perfect strategy -- that the usual "coattail riding" effect this year will be reversed, with Obama doing well only if the Democrats do in state and local elections (and we need them there!)The down-ticket women and advocacy groups are going to need all the money they can get.I wonder what will happen in a second term, when there is no pressure to be re-elected. I know I would love a President who did what was right and didn't w[...]



Guest Post: Disappointed Doesn’t Cut It Anymore: A Mother’s Rebuttal of President Obama’s Plan B Politics

2011-12-09T09:57:06-08:00

The MOMocrats welcome this guest post, written by Kate Stewart. Cross-posted with permission from Amplify. Disappointed doesn’t cut it anymore. Disappointed, angry, dismayed -- these are only some of the emotions I am feeling this afternoon after hearing President Obama's... The MOMocrats welcome this guest post, written by Kate Stewart. Cross-posted with permission from Amplify. Disappointed doesn’t cut it anymore. Disappointed, angry, dismayed -- these are only some of the emotions I am feeling this afternoon after hearing President Obama's poor excuse for restricting access to Plan B One Step. I am also scared. Scared about the health of my daughters.  As the mother of two daughters, just like President Obama, I try to use "common sense" as much as possible. But, also like President Obama, I am not a doctor; I am not a scientist. I use my own judgment when it comes to things I am confident I can handle -- a case of the sniffles, a little cold.  But, I also understand that it is my responsibility as a parent to know when I don't know all the answers and it’s time to turn to experts. And that, apparently, is where the President and I disagree. When my daughter’s pediatrician gives me medical advice, I listen. Carefully. American Academy of Pediatrics and the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine make recommendations about my daughters' health, that matters to me. A lot. And I believe it should.  Today, President Obama has made the irresponsible – and nearly incomprehensible -- decision to support HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ move to block the FDA from expanding access to Plan B One-Step emergency contraception. Whether the President’s decision was motivated by well-intentioned ignorance or political cowardice is beside the point. Either way, this move will adversely impact millions of women, particularly young women, across the country.  President Obama has decided to ignore scientific research and medical advice and has sacrificed the health of young women. And I want to know why. Why, Mr. President? Why would you reject years of research and the best scientific thinking the medical community has to offer? Why, for the first time in U.S. history, did your administration intervene to overrule the FDA’s ability to make decision about medical science? On Monday, I was optimistic. The FDA was expected to expand the availability of Plan B One-Step, a form of back-up birth control that can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or if something goes wrong with regular contraception. Indeed, the FDA tried to do just that: make Plan B One-Step available to all women — without age restrictions and without needing a prescription. If either of my daughters ever needs back-up birth control, I hope I will be among the first to know and I would help them in whatever way I could. But, life is not always as we want it to be, and therefore, it is essential that young people have the access to the information and services they need to ensure their health and safety. I thought we were headed in this direction on Monday. But, my optimism suddenly turned to dismay. Yesterday, in a shocking move, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius took the unprecedented step of overruling the FDA and blocking its decision to expand access to emergency contraception. I held out a brief hope that President Obama would intervene and allow the FDA to do its job unhampered by politics, but those hopes were soon dashed as well. Today, President Obama came out in support of Secretary Sebelius' action – and, in doing so, decided to play politics with the lives and health of young women. To say I was shocked when listening to the President is an understatement. It’s not just that I disagree with his position, it’s that his reasoning is so hollow and unsubstantiated. This Harvard-educated legal scholar who has signed presidential directi[...]



Michele Bachmann: Terrible GOP Presidential Candidate, But Terrific Democratic Party Opposition Researcher

2011-11-16T17:06:50-08:00

Michele Bachmann creates a video that throws a klieg light on the flip-flops of all her fellow Republican candidates for president, thereby ensuring that NONE of them will win. Thanks Michele!

The proof's right here:


frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jIiBPTBO-2M" width="560">
I think Congresswoman Bachmann saved President Obama some legwork, don't you?

And something tells me she won't be on the GOP nominee's dance card to fill the seat for Vice President after pointing out all the Presidential nominee's inconsistencies like that.

So what do you say we help her spread this useful video around?

;)

 

Cynematic would like a nice, sane, democratic, fact- and reality-based country to entrust to her child for safekeeping. Wouldn't you also?




Run, Mama Run!: Bock the Women's Vote

2011-10-31T09:02:04-07:00

It may not be 2012 yet, but important elections are already being held -- and one mission of MOMocrats is to shine a light on the races of progressive women running for office on all levels: Federal, state and local....It may not be 2012 yet, but important elections are already being held -- and one mission of MOMocrats is to shine a light on the races of progressive women running for office on all levels: Federal, state and local. This piece was written by EMILY's List Executive Director, Amy Dacey, who spent the weekend in San Francisco doing what the organization does best: training women in the art of politics and supporting their choice for District Attorney, candidate Sharmin Bock. Last week, I touched down in sunny California ready to spend a weekend helping candidates and speak at an EMILY’s List training.  I was able to attend an event for Sharmin Bock’s campaign for San Francisco District Attorney, and when I arrived on Chestnut Street on Saturday afternoon she welcomed me with open arms.  We talked briefly about how things are progressing and how close the race is.  She’s up on television with an ad about her experience as a prosecutor and her success rate putting criminals behind bars.   frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/PDW_Y8eNGkU" width="560"> The more we can tell San Francisco about Sharmin, the more people see she’s the best choice. While we met, Sharmin was jumping up every few minutes to talk to voters about her experience and what she hopes to do to keep up the good work in the District Attorney’s office.  Supporters arrived and they talked about the importance of this race, not just locally but across the country, because strong women in office help create better public policy and ensure our values are represented. Sharmin talked about what it means for her to run for office.  She said women running help set an example for her 13 year old daughter Fiona who told her that more women need to be serving in government.   I couldn’t agree more! Elections like these are won and lost by the little things.  We've got one week until the Election Day on November 8th.  Whether you can canvass neighborhoods, support financially, or spread the word about the campaign on Twitter, your help makes a difference.   Everyone had a great trip, but we were most excited about Sharmin Bock.  She’s the most experienced and, by far, the best person for the job. This year, we've seen the EMILY’s List pipeline in action over and over again.  With our Political Opportunity Program (POP), we have recruited and trained local and state leaders who are well-prepared to move up to the next level: EMILY’s List alum Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin moved from local office to Congress, and now we’re excited to endorse her for the U. S. Senate.   Right behind her, we’ve got “On the List” candidate State Rep. Kelda Roys moving up to run for the open Congressional seat, and that’s just one state.   In California, we’re so happy to have Attorney General Kamala Harris, who was previously the San Francisco District Attorney.   Now Sharmin Bock is moving up from the role of prosecutor to run for that District Attorney seat, and we’ve got to help her win! If you want to get involved in the EMILY’s List Political Opportunity Program you can learn more here, and help us change the face of politics at the local, state, and national level.  [...]



Kirsten, Debbie & Gabby: "In Friendship We Trust"

2011-10-20T14:58:11-07:00

(Photo from UPI.com, 2009) I originally read this at the great site, Off the Sidelines. I appreciate an organization that encourages and supports women to becomes active in public policy and more, but more than that, I appreciate seeing examples...(Photo from UPI.com, 2009) I originally read this at the great site, Off the Sidelines. I appreciate an organization that encourages and supports women to becomes active in public policy and more, but more than that, I appreciate seeing examples of when Washington (that dehumanized amorpohous entity) works: because people work with other people to accomplish important acts that improve how our country functions. It seems as if we forget all too often that Washington, citizenry, constituencies, companies, everything...is made of people. Because I've always been people-focused and because I'm reading this mind-blowing book called Humanize (which is so good I actually put a review up on Amazon), it's really on my mind, and that's probably why this post so spectacularly resonated with me that I was moved to shift from reader to poster.  When I see action coming from Congress that is true grassroots beneficial legislation, time and again it seems to come from Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. What makes some politicians so accessible, their actions so transparent, and their efforts so targeted to what citizens want...and how, in a House (and Senate) divided, are these politicians such as Gillibrand able to consistently succeed in their efforts? Connections with people. Connections to the people. Those bonds of connection--of being people-centric (as Humanize explains it)--are crucial to actually accomplish and be productive, successful. That's because it enables the person to hear the people, talk to other people, and enlist people to help get what needs to be done, done. Gillibrand has spent her tenure (and she's one example) building connections with people in and out of Washington. In Washington, in particular, she has connected with Gabby Giffords and Debbie Wasserman Schultz. This article, which I was graciously given permission to repost, showcases exactly how these bonds and connections have not just supported Giffords, Gillibrand, and Wasserman Schultz, but have encouraged and empowered them to succeed---despite tragedy. Most importantly, it shows that women can work well together (despite a lot of media and culture rumors to the contrary), can encourage each other's success, and can, by connecting, accomplish what this country needs now most. Here's the article: The new issue of Good Housekeeping has an inspiring article about the bond Kirsten has had with Gabby Giffords and Debbie Wasserman Schultz ever since they all served in the House together and became fast friends and a tight mutual support system. Early in their careers, they met, bonded, and became one another’s champions, helping one another through crises ranging from minor to major to unimaginable. All young by Washington standards (Gabby is 41, Kirsten is 44, and Debbie is 45), the three represent a significant part of the roughly 20% of the Congressional voice that is female—of 535 Senators and Representatives, only 93 are women and the average age is 53. As the article makes clear, their bond is unique in Washington, D.C. not just because of the dearth of women serving in the Congress, but also because of the unique way women work together. The reasons behind the trio’s friendship are the reasons why women are so valuable in Congress, and the clout that they embody is changing the way business is done on Capitol Hill. They have committed not only to meaningful alliances with Republican Congresswomen, but also to a concerted effort to get more women involved in politics and elected at every level of government. [...] The women who enter the battlef[...]



Salon op-ed compares Melissa Harris-Perry to Bachmann, KKK

2011-09-29T14:29:43-07:00

Yesterday, Salon.com published an op-ed by white liberal columnist Gene Lyons in response to Melissa Harris-Perry's recent writing for The Nation on racism as a factor in declining white liberal support for the President. Rather than disagreeing thoughtfully and respectfully...Yesterday, Salon.com published an op-ed by white liberal columnist Gene Lyons in response to Melissa Harris-Perry's recent writing for The Nation on racism as a factor in declining white liberal support for the President. Rather than disagreeing thoughtfully and respectfully with Harris-Perry's argument, Lyons chose not to focus on criticizing the substance of her articles but instead on attacking her as a black female intellectual. The short version: Lyons dismissed Harris-Perry as a "fool" and "a left-wing Michele Bachmann, an attractive woman seeking fame and fortune by saying silly things on cable TV." He claimed her argument that white racism may be a factor in liberal disillusionment with POTUS is a "photonegative of KKK racial thought," and dismissed her writings on race as "useful for intimidating tenure committees staffed by Ph.D.s trained to find racist symbols in the passing clouds." On top of all that, Lyons mocks black experiences of racism and our right to speak out about it thus: "Furthermore, unless you're black, you can't possibly understand. Yada, yada, yada. This unfortunate obsession..." There's absolutely no question that this is an outright attack on Prof. Harris-Perry's race, gender, and professional accomplishments. Even more disturbing, it's an attack on all black people and all other people of color who dare to study or publicly raise the issue of racism on the left. Lyons makes no serious attempt to engage with, much less disprove Harris-Perry's hypothesis. Instead he tries to discredit her by sexualizing her appearance and portrays her as a silly, greedy, self-interested woman with nothing of worth to contribute to public discourse. He basically mocks her for having a Ph.D and dismisses her training and expertise as not just worthless, but actually fraudulent ("trained to find racist symbols in the passing clouds"). Again, this is not just about a personal attack; his comments imply that the entire field of critical race studies is a joke and a con. Lyons' comparison of Harris-Perry, a careful, accomplished, and much respected scholar of race, to Michele Bachmann, a woman who believes that black families were better off under slavery and praises the policies of an era where the U.S. placed racial and geographic caps on immigration, is particularly outrageous. Given that virtually the only thing Bachmann and Harris-Perry have in common is their gender and presence in the public sphere, Lyons' implication that any woman he disagrees with must not be worth listening to is unmistakable. So too is his apparent belief that the physical appearance of any woman who exist in public is open to his appraisal. The bottom line is that Harris-Perry's great offense is daring to be a black woman, publicly saying something about race that Gene Lyons didn't like and found irritating. And this irritation apparently justifies thinking that being a black woman with an opinion on race a white liberal finds inconvenient is tantamount to the kind of racial thinking that led to black people being lynched, burned alive, raped, beaten, and terrorized by white Klansmen. Lyons clearly either has no clue what the KKK did, or simply doesn't care. He clearly needs an education, or a reminder, in what the effects of actual KKK racial thought looked like [warning: images of violence]. To take this history so lightly as to use it as a tool to lecture people of color about how we should talk about race, as a label to undermine a woman of color, is an incredible affront to al[...]



MOMocrats MOMochat: The Battle in Seattle -- Which Way "Ed Reform"?

2011-09-27T17:47:55-07:00

The morning of Wednesday, September 28, 2011, join Cynematic, Karoli and Donna Schwartz Mills for a lively Blog Talk Radio podcast with four women running for school board in Bill Gates' backyard up in Seattle. Sharon Peaslee, Michelle Buetow, Kate Martin and Marty McLaren have a vision for education in their district, and we'll hear why it doesn't completely mesh with that of Gates and the Broad Foundation's plans for education reform in America.The morning of Wednesday, September 28, 2011, join Cynematic, Karoli and Donna Schwartz Mills for a lively Blog Talk Radio podcast with four women running for school board in Bill Gates' backyard up in Seattle. Sharon Peaslee, Michelle Buetow, Kate Martin and Marty McLaren have a vision for education in their district, and we'll hear why it doesn't completely mesh with that of Gates and the Broad Foundation's plans for education reform in America. What's the difference between what these candidates have to offer and "ed reform" (or as some say, "ed Rheeform")? How did the Seattle Public Schools end up with a School Superintendent, Dr. Marie Goodloe-Johnson, who badly mismanaged school district finances? (Read more about graduates of the Broad Superintendent School in the Parents' Guide to the Broad Foundation. They're awfully high-flying but seem to run into trouble no matter where they're posted around the country.) What needs to be done to get SPS finances on the right track going forward? And what, if any shadow, does the Gates Foundation cast on public schools in its own back yard? These issues may seem local to Seattle but they're national in impact. Schools across the country are grappling with the same problems -- and it's no wonder. Gates Foundation money is everywhere, as are Broad Foundation school superintendents. All four candidates will also appear at The Stranger's School Board Candidates' Debate the same evening, Wednesday, September 28, 2011, at the Town Hall in downtown Seattle starting at 7:30 pm PT. Cynematic blogs at P i l l o w b o o k and education news at K12NewsNetwork.com. [...]



This Week on MOMochat: The Case Against Genetically Modified "Frankenfoods"

2011-09-20T15:42:23-07:00

Should we be concerned about produce that originated in a laboratory? Or the results of cross-pollination from a GMO crop into the food chain? These are some of the questions that are posed to this week's special guest, dietitian Ashley...

(image)
Should we be concerned about produce that originated in a laboratory? Or the results of cross-pollination from a GMO crop into the food chain?

These are some of the questions that are posed to this week's special guest, dietitian Ashley Koff,  author of the new book, Mom Energy, and one of the spokespeople for this month's Right2Know March. Ashley talks in-depth about the dangers of GMO foods and what to do about it with MOMocrats Cynematic and Jaelithe Judy (who also writes extensively about food and politics at Care2.com). 

MOMocrats Donna Schwartz Mills and Karoli are also on hand to discuss this week's news. 

Listen to the podcast live Wednesday, September 21 at 12:00 noon Eastern/11:00 a.m. Central/9:00 a.m. Pacific or catch the podcast here.

Brought to you by Bubble Genius.

 




APEC Summit on Women & the Economy

2011-09-18T16:45:38-07:00

Recently, I was privileged to be able to attend a part of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Women & the Economy Summit in San Francisco. The conference brought together women leaders, government officials, diplomats, and corporate innovators to discuss actions... Recently, I was privileged to be able to attend a part of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Women & the Economy Summit in San Francisco. The conference brought together women leaders, government officials, diplomats, and corporate innovators to discuss actions to improve the lives of women in the Asia-Pacific region, and by doing so, the world's economy. Recognizing that women are a vast, largely untapped resource for change and growth, the group spent a week in San Francisco working on plans for change.  This was one of several meetings around the Pacific Rim leading up to the APEC Summit in Hawaii in November that President Obama will attend. The Conference Keynote was delivered by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Secretary Clinton has inspired a generation of women to enter political life to try to dismantle the political barriers that keep women from fully participating in economic growth.  Her speech was a call to action, for all nations to tap the power, creativity, and drive of women to help elevate all people, across all regions. Although characterized by some in the media as a "call for equal rights," Clinton's vision was much broader than that.  In her speech, she stated, Now there will be a temptation on the part of those observing or covering this summit, perhaps on the part of those of us attending it as well, to say that our purpose is chiefly to advance the rights of women, to achieve justice and equality on women’s behalf. And that is, of course, a noble cause to be sure and one that is very close to my heart. But at the risk of being somewhat provocative at the outset, I believe our goal is even bolder, one that extends beyond women to all humankind. The big challenge we face in these early years of 21st century is how to grow our economies and ensure shared prosperity for all nations and all people. We want to give every one of our citizens, men and women alike, young and old alike, greater opportunity to find work, to save and spend money, to pursue happiness ultimately to live up to their own God-given potentials. Secretary Clinton went on to give specific examples and data illustrating the issues that Summit attendees hoped to offer specific, concrete actions to resolve.  She went on to note that her husband is fond of saying that "we don't have a person to waste" in this effort, and she added, "We certainly don't have a gender to waste." The full text and video of Secretary Clinton's speech can be found at the US State Department's website. After the speech, the high-level diplomats and delegates from all the APEC countries convened in a closed-door session to work out the details that would become the San Francisco Declaration. The key elements of the Declaration that are required for economic empowerment of women are: Access to capital; Access to markets; Building capacity and skills; and Promoting women in leadership positions. All twenty-one nations represented at the Summit unanimously adopted the declaration. I was not able to stay very long at the Summit, but I was able to attend one Plenary Session moderated by Tina Brown of The Daily Beast and Newsweek.  Also on the panel were Ilene Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst, a research and advisory firm that specializes in promoting women in business; Blanca Trevino, CEO of Softtek, a global Information Technololgy firm based i[...]



This Week on MOMochat: Want More Women in Office? She Should Run, with The Women's Campaign Forum

2011-09-14T08:45:21-07:00

When women sit at the table, the conversation includes topics that are near and dear to us: Education. Healthcare. Eldercare. Living Wages. Work-Life Balance. Reproductive Rights. So it's a shame that so few women have seats in our nation's legislatures:...

When women sit at the table, the conversation includes topics that are near and dear to us: Education. Healthcare. Eldercare. Living Wages. Work-Life Balance. Reproductive Rights.

So it's a shame that so few women have seats in our nation's legislatures: According to the Women's Campaign Forum, we're ranked 87th in the world for the number of women in our national legislature. Even Cuba and Afghanistan have more female representation than us!

(image) Next Wednesday, the WCF is holding its the She Should Run Inaugural National Conversation, a conference designed to address the "urgent need for women to advance in leadership across all sectors." We'll be hearing more about that on tomorrow's edition of MOMocrats MOMochat, when our special guest is Women's Campaign Forum President Siobhan "Sam" Bennett.

Bennett has served as the President and CEO of the Women’s Campaign Fund (WCF) and its affiliated programs The She Should Run Foundation and WCF PAC since March 2009.

Sam has lent her unique perspective as a candidate at the local and federal levels to broaden WCF’s impact on women leaders at all levels of government who support reproductive choices and options, and women who may run for office in the future.

Join Cynematic, Julie Pippert and Donna Schwartz Mills live tomorrow at 12:00 noon Eastern/11:00 Central/9:00 a.m. Pacific, or catch us on the podcast here.

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