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Preview: Comments on The Gimp Parade: Medical professionals who are excellent, asses and...

Comments on The Gimp Parade: Medical professionals who are excellent, asses and part of a failing system





Updated: 2013-04-13T03:08:48.680-05:00

 



blue, that gives me hope!!!! I see a neurosurgeon ...

2007-04-12T07:48:00.000-05:00

blue, that gives me hope!!!! I see a neurosurgeon in a month and I have been bracing myself for abrassive and short, in the hopes that I can put my ego and emotions aside and rate him based on knowledge, choices, etc. Hard to do, but maybe, just maybe I won't have to. Hope is a nice thing to have.



in case blogger explodes or somethingShhhhhh. Such...

2007-04-10T20:10:00.000-05:00

in case blogger explodes or something

Shhhhhh. Such things must not be spoken aloud.

(And thanks.)



i am absolutely obsessed with this blog. just lett...

2007-04-10T20:00:00.000-05:00

i am absolutely obsessed with this blog. just letting you know, in case blogger explodes or something.

-chris



Ook!: The white board, or written communication, a...

2007-04-05T22:15:00.000-05:00

Ook!: The white board, or written communication, adds a level of difficulty, in my experience. Or to put it another way, it shows who respects you and who doesn't very expediently. Good luck with the upcoming surgery.

Xine: I've had some fantastic surgeons, not just technically but personally. I had one in my teens who was very comunicative and compassionate, and when a complication arose from my surgery that left me with a great deal of lasting pain (it was back surgery) and he was upfront that a nerve was probably bruised during the delicate and complicated procedure, I found the honesty comforting. It didn't diminish my sense of his expertise and made him trustworthy. I wish they taught that to all surgeons.



surgeons are known for their horrible bedside mann...

2007-04-05T11:28:00.000-05:00

surgeons are known for their horrible bedside manner (or lack of manners at all). I just got an email this morning from a doc friend of mine which said: "Surgeons dont like people, they like people's parts." And that seems to sum it up. We are just a bunch of parts. At the same time, I realize that some of the best surgeons are those asshats. The surgeon who saved my brother's life was the biggest ass I'd ever met. But maybe one of the only people in the state who could have saved his life. I've come to terms with him, and am just happy that this particular asshole was the one on call that night.



That reminded me of a comic strip http://www.lucid...

2007-04-04T16:08:00.000-05:00

That reminded me of a comic strip http://www.lucid-tv.com/020.html



I've had surgery several times in the past, but la...

2007-04-04T07:40:00.000-05:00

I've had surgery several times in the past, but last year's surgery was the first time I'd really been old enough to be actively involved in what was going on. Despite this, I was ignored by most of the MDs I came in contact with - the surgeon, the anesthesiologist, the guy who referred me. At the time, I wrote it up to a combination of being temporarily communicating with notes on a white board (cumbersome) and being a young adult in a pediatric hospital.

But in the last few months, I've been going through a lot of prep work for the cochlear implant I'll be getting this summer. Even more than last year, this is a surgery where I am in control; it's entirely voluntary, and I'm the driving force making sure it happens. But even though it's now easy to communicate with me, I've found that the surgeon (a different one this time) just doesn't want to. In fact, sometimes the only way to reach her is to email the audiologist involved and have her intervene directly. Contrast this with the support staff - the CT techs, 2 audiologists, the surgeon's scheduling nurse - all of whom are friendly and wonderful and take the time to hear my concerns. I could echo what you said about your doc: "[s]he seems skilled, and I appreiate that ... But here's the thing: [s]he's a total ass to the other people [involved]."

One good example of this was in my blog a while back - the surgeon commented on my reliance on lip reading, then almost immediately turned her back to me. At the time, I couldn't understand why, and chalked it up to incompetence. Now, I'm thinking it's part of the "meat on a slab" phenomenon, and that Ook-the-patient has been separated somehow from Ook-the-person-I'm-talking-to. Doesn't explain her rudeness, both personal and professional, towards the support staff, though.

And yet ... everyone she works with (and treats like dirt) tells me that she's the best. That I'm lucky to have such a skilled surgeon doing the implantation.