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Preview: Comments on The Gimp Parade: Anniversary -- Escaping institutionalization

Comments on The Gimp Parade: Anniversary -- Escaping institutionalization





Updated: 2013-04-13T03:08:48.680-05:00

 



Dear Kay, I am SO sorry you went through this hel...

2010-07-23T16:09:26.629-05:00

Dear Kay,

I am SO sorry you went through this hell. I remember a bit of it at the time, though it was during a period of transition for me, where I wasn't on the boards much and had lost touch with a lot of friends. Reading this reminded me of just how horrible things were for you I can see why this would be a bittersweet, anniversary, but I am so glad you made it through. Thank goodness for loving parents and your own tenacity.

Sending the very best wishes to you,

Tina
(Expository)



I needed to read this today Kay...This is wonderfu...

2007-03-17T20:18:00.000-05:00

I needed to read this today Kay...This is wonderful....

Happy (belated) anniversary.



Thanks all.In my comment above to Moggy, it should...

2007-03-14T22:58:00.000-05:00

Thanks all.

In my comment above to Moggy, it should have read that I left some thoughts unfinished so I could get it written.

And I wanted to come back to some of that, Moggy. I'm realy self-conscious about that paragraph on the homeless and mentally ill. I stand by it, but again, I'm aware what a privilege it is to not have to be in that home when others had no alternative. And I know all mentally ill people are not dangerous -- or even actually mentally ill, as Moggy says.

When my grandmother was in a nursing home in her small northern MN town for her final years, it was a place attached to the local hospital and many many of the people she had known all her life were also there. It wasn't the best place she could have been in the world, but it also was nothing like so many of the nursing homes today, where acute care patients are mixed with folks with Alzheimers and injured young folks whose insurance won't let them finish up at rehab, and professionals pinched more and more for time to help everyone. There was also that attached hospital for my grandma, so if she needed urgent care, it was right there in a way that could not have been offered for me.

I appreciate everyone's cheering and support of me for not ending up there, and instead being home writing about it. But you know, my folks are aging and Medicare is messing with my supplies and the isurance company is touchy sometimes too, so I'm not a permanent escapee for sure. And the people in those homes right now are me. Just without internet access or hope.



I just followed your story from David's blog. Than...

2007-03-14T20:28:00.000-05:00

I just followed your story from David's blog. Thank you so much for sharing your journey. It makes me sad to think of the state of nursing homes.



Kay ...Thanks for telling the story. I learned a ...

2007-03-13T10:31:00.000-05:00

Kay ...

Thanks for telling the story. I learned a lot from it. And happy anniversary.



This is an extraordinary account of the experience...

2007-03-13T08:02:00.000-05:00

This is an extraordinary account of the experience of escaping institutionalization and you put it so well. I was also saved by people who cared from being institutionalized and was never so frightened in my life. There is power in stories like this - these experiences need to be brought into the forefront to fully explain the thin line between instutionalization or not and to put faces on the people who wind up there so that we can work toward getting them out. Thanks.



Yep, my parents are awesome -- both as support and...

2007-03-12T22:37:00.000-05:00

Yep, my parents are awesome -- both as support and, generally, as people.

Sara: Wow, that story at Toad in the Hole. Thanks for the links. I'd somehow missed your discussion on insurance, as well. I'll be revisiting that, for sure.

Moggy: You raise a lot of issues, and some thoughts I left finished above so I could just write what I needed to. Everything about sticking people in institutions because they are thought to be cheaper and more efficient than other settings encourages dangerous situations for the vulnerable people stuck there, as far as I can tell. If there were efforts made and money allocated to really safeguard people, it would be better spent helping most all of them live elsewhere anyway.



I agree with "Janet" -- you should submit this som...

2007-03-12T16:07:00.000-05:00

I agree with "Janet" -- you should submit this somewhere, more people should know. Perhaps even do a little video thing as Ballastexistenz (Amanda) did, and get CNN to pay attention? (I'm serious.)

I also agree that your parents really, really kick ass. My father does, but my mother's the one I live with, and she has issues.

I will have to leave commentary on this topic up to someone else that knows a lot more... But IIRC the chances of a mentally ill person being abused/killed are far higher than the chances of them harming anyone, and normally they're put on sedating drugs.

I do know that a lot of Autistic people are misdiagnosed as psychotic or sociopathic and locked up in such places -- they're far more likely to be hurt or killed than to ever harm someone. I also know that most Auties labeled 'violent' are actually being caused such severe pain/distress that they melt down in a desperate attempt to make it stop. :(

I totally agree that institutions of any kind (including nursing homes) are extremely dangerous, and that the "inmates" can be a part of that. I'm worried that I'll be put in one because of my physical, psych, and autistic disabilities. But from what I've heard from people locked up before, most of the danger really is from staff having the Stanford Prison Experiment effect. (Not all, but most. Some is also from staff turning patients against one another for various reasons.)

That's not firsthand speaking, though, and I've only moderately studied the issue... Hopefully somebody with institutional experience from each side will comment.



thank you for this post.WCD

2007-03-12T11:36:00.000-05:00

thank you for this post.

WCD



It is not hard to see how one could grow weary of ...

2007-03-12T10:16:00.000-05:00

It is not hard to see how one could grow weary of the constant battle for respect, health care, fair treatment and other hassles and fall prey to the cultural lie that it is better to "die with dignity" than to "live like this". Hopefully, it is also easy to see that it is the very lack of services and uncaring attitude of some that leads (or perhaps pushes is a better word) a person down that treacherous path.
Janet



Powerful story. Thanks for sharing. Have you tho...

2007-03-12T09:40:00.000-05:00

Powerful story. Thanks for sharing. Have you thought of submitting this to the New York Times or Commondreams or some other media outlet for publication? It's well worth a read at any time, but with health care coming up in the election issues, perhaps a media outlet would be interested.
Janet



It bears repeating: Your parents are awesome.(And...

2007-03-12T09:33:00.000-05:00

It bears repeating: Your parents are awesome.

(And insurance companies? Don't get me started. Oy, the things I've been reading lately, even about state-funded insurance. People are dying because of our "health care" system in this country. But somehow we have money to wage war -- except we don't really because aftercare for wounded veterans has been seriously underfunded from the beginning.

Oh, uh, I did say "Don't get me started," didn't I? Sorry.)