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Preview: Comments on The Gimp Parade: "Is your life hard or super-hard?"

Comments on The Gimp Parade: "Is your life hard or super-hard?"





Updated: 2013-04-13T03:08:48.680-05:00

 



Interesting thought, connecting the childhood jerk...

2006-10-04T16:18:00.000-05:00

Interesting thought, connecting the childhood jerk to the adult surprise.

Yeah, that leap backwards is weird. And the "Excuse me" that appears to be an apology for being anywhere within ten feet of the wheelchair.



I used to wonder if that reaction I saw so often i...

2006-10-04T02:37:00.000-05:00

I used to wonder if that reaction I saw so often in adults when Cress & I used to go shopping or what have you--that wild LEAP backwards when first noticing someone using a wheelchair or scooter, that frenetic "Oh, EXCUSE ME!" when they weren't anywhere near in the first place--isn't a result of being JERKED backwards so often by parents as a kid. I've seen that so many times too--yanking the kid back when s/he wasn't in the way in the first place. I think that creates part of that strong recoil reaction in so many able-bodied adults. That scooter story is sweet; I wish more parents behaved like that.



Years ago, I had a little boy in the grocery store...

2006-09-27T20:33:00.000-05:00

Years ago, I had a little boy in the grocery store ask me about my power chair, "Is it kinda like a truck?"

Cracked my mom and me up.



I think it is cool that the mother stopped you and...

2006-09-27T20:15:00.000-05:00

I think it is cool that the mother stopped you and explained to her daughter in basic terms why you had your scooter, instead of schooshing her quietly away. In a way i think it may be a hard thing for allot of people to explain disability(s) to their kids because they do not know enough information and/or are uncorfortable adressing the subject. in some ways it is allot like parents adressing the sex issue at home. some hate to discuss the issue at home.



I left out that there is a middle-ground of parent...

2006-09-26T14:41:00.000-05:00

I left out that there is a middle-ground of parents who don’t bring their child to me for a little education, but patiently answer their loud questions as if it’s reasonable to be curious. I’m cool with that too.

Silent Spring: Yay for remission!

I’d tell the kid that someone has to break a leg or get a heart condition that makes it hard to walk far. Or use a wheelchair, so they need to be close to the building to push it or have the wide space to deploy their lift or ramp. Or lots of other conditions where the person needs the help of either proximity or the super-wide space. Every adult has that longing for the empty parking space, I don’t expect you can rid a child of it.

Incidentally, when I got my first disabled access license plate in 1983, I named it the Power of God Parking Permit, because that sort of exceptionality to a common modern problem seemed so bizarre to me. More people have them now then before though, so it’s not the total bonus it used to be.



My 7 year old said, “I wish we could park in the h...

2006-09-26T08:55:00.000-05:00

My 7 year old said, “I wish we could park in the handicapped space, Mom. What can we do to become handicapped?” I was speechless. I didn’t know what to say. I still don’t. What would you say, Gimp?

I can tell you what I'd be inclined to do, as the father of a three-year-old who is growing up with adults with both visible and invisible disabilities in her life.

First I'd ask her if she knew what it meant to be handicapped, and ask her to define the word if she said yes. It sounds like she may not be quite clear on the concept. If she was confused about what handicapped parking spots were for, we'd talk about that.

If she understood it, but just thought that having a disability would make getting around easier because of the parking advantages, I'd ask her to think about some of the specific ways in which getting around would be harder if she had various disabilities. I'd try to give a variety of examples --- not just wheelchairs and crutches.

I suspect that by that point most seven-year-olds I know would be rolling their eyes and saying "okay, I get it." So I'd probably stop there.



Beautiful post.A few weeks ago my kids and I were ...

2006-09-26T00:43:00.000-05:00

Beautiful post.

A few weeks ago my kids and I were driving around a parking lot looking for a space nearest the entrance. My 7 year old said, “I wish we could park in the handicapped space, Mom. What can we do to become handicapped?” I was speechless. I didn’t know what to say. I still don’t. What would you say, Gimp?

Your post sort of reminds me of how some people treated me when I was going through cancer treatment (been in remission for 6 months now) — like I was less than who I had always been, and now defined by my disease. Pity looks. Glad-it’s-not-me Freudian slips.