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pubmed: Laivuori H[Author]



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Maternal early pregnancy obesity and depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy.

Maternal early pregnancy obesity and depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy.

Psychol Med. 2018 Jan 17;:1-11

Authors: Kumpulainen SM, Girchenko P, Lahti-Pulkkinen M, Reynolds RM, Tuovinen S, Pesonen AK, Heinonen K, Kajantie E, Villa PM, Hämäläinen E, Laivuori H, Räikkönen K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have linked maternal obesity with depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy. It remains unknown whether obesity associates with consistently elevated depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy, predicts symptoms postpartum when accounting for antenatal symptoms, and if co-morbid hypertensive and diabetic disorders add to these associations. We addressed these questions in a sample of Finnish women whom we followed during and after pregnancy.
METHODS: Early pregnancy body mass index, derived from the Finnish Medical Birth Register and hospital records in 3234 PREDO study participants, was categorized into underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5-24.99 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.99 kg/m2), and obese (⩾30 kg/m2) groups. The women completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale biweekly during pregnancy, and at 2.4 (s.d. = 1.2) and/or 28.2 (s.d. = 4.2) weeks after pregnancy.
RESULTS: In comparison to normal weight women, overweight, and obese women reported higher levels of depressive symptoms and had higher odds of clinically significant depressive symptoms during (23% and 43%, respectively) and after pregnancy (22% and 36%, respectively). Underweight women had 68% higher odds of clinically significant depressive symptoms after pregnancy. Overweight and obesity also predicted higher depressive symptoms after pregnancy in women not reporting clinically relevant symptomatology during pregnancy. Hypertensive and diabetic disorders did not explain or add to these associations.
CONCLUSIONS: Maternal early pregnancy overweight and obesity and depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy are associated. Mental health promotion should be included as an integral part of lifestyle interventions in early pregnancy obesity and extended to benefit also overweight and underweight women.

PMID: 29338797 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]




Placental Morphology Is Associated with Maternal Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and Toddler Psychiatric Problems.
Related Articles

Placental Morphology Is Associated with Maternal Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and Toddler Psychiatric Problems.

Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 15;8(1):791

Authors: Lahti-Pulkkinen M, Cudmore MJ, Haeussner E, Schmitz C, Pesonen AK, Hämäläinen E, Villa PM, Mehtälä S, Kajantie E, Laivuori H, Reynolds RM, Frank HG, Räikkönen K

Abstract
Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy predict increased psychiatric problems in children. The underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. Hence, we examined whether alterations in the morphology of 88 term placentas were associated with maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and psychiatric problems in 1.9-3.1-years old (Mean = 2.1 years) toddlers. Maternal depressive symptoms were rated biweekly during pregnancy with the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (n = 86). Toddler psychiatric problems were mother-rated with the Child Behavior Checklist (n = 60). We found that higher maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy [B = -0.24 Standard Deviation (SD) units: 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = -0.46; -0.03: P = 0.03; Mean difference = -0.66 SDs; 95% CI = -0.08; -1.23: P = 0.03; between those with and without clinically relevant depressive symptoms] were associated with lower variability in the placental villous barrier thickness of γ-smooth muscle actin-negative villi. This placental morphological change predicted higher total (B = -0.34 SDs: 95% CI = -0.60; -0.07: P = 0.01) and internalizing (B = -0.32 SDs: 95% CI = -0.56; -0.08: P = 0.01) psychiatric problems in toddlers. To conclude, our findings suggest that both maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and toddler psychiatric problems may be associated with lower variability in the villous membrane thickness of peripheral villi in term placentas. This lower heterogeneity may compromise materno-fetal exchange, suggesting a possible role for altered placental morphology in the fetal programming of mental disorders.

PMID: 29335435 [PubMed - in process]