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MedWorm.com provides a medical RSS filtering service. Thousands of medical RSS feeds are combined and output via different filters. This feed contains the latest news in Science



Last Build Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2018 21:34:41 +0100

 



We need more women like Michelle Malkin, a hero of truth, courage and the freedom to think

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 11:52:51 +0100

(Natural News) When the internet was born, ideas began to spread like never before. As social media came of age, freedom of speech, press, and expression multiplied. News and information were decentralized, giving voice to thousands of independent bloggers and journalists with unique backgrounds, experiences, and motivations. Independent journalism, science, and research replaced corporate-run media and education. The age of transparency commenced.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)

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T-Mobile goes all-in for communism-style "equal pay" and LGBT quack science in pathetic attempt at virtue signaling

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 11:43:07 +0100

(Natural News) A lot of people watched the Super Bowl this year despite the fact that football fans and non-fans who love America were essentially given the middle finger every week during the regular season by players who sat or knelt during the playing of our National Anthem. Though viewership was down from previous years,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)



Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 10:00:20 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



China ’s great leap forward in science

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 09:00:40 +0100

Chinese investment is paying off with serious advances in biotech, computing and space. Are they edging ahead of the west?I first met Xiaogang Peng in the summer of 1992 at Jilin University in Changchun, in the remote north-east of China, where he was a postgraduate student in the department of chemistry. He told me that his dream was to get a place at a top American lab. Now, Xiaogang was evidently smart and hard-working – but so, as far as I could see, were most Chinese science students. I wished him well, but couldn’t help thinking he’d set himself a massive challenge.Fast forward four years to when, as an editor atNature, I publish a paper on nanotechnology from world-leading chemists at the University of California at Berkeley. Among them was Xiaogang. That 1996 paper now appear...



George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:30:38 +0100

The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies almost everybody in the population getting sequenced is reproductive decision making: who to date, who to marry, whether or not to have gamete [egg/sperm] donors. Anybody that is...



How can I make money from my DNA?

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:30:38 +0100

If you have your DNA sequenced, someone somewhere will be making money from the data. A new start-up aims to make sure that you get your share• A share in the future of DNA: Prof George Church Q&AIf you unlock the secrets of your DNA by paying a company to read your genes, behind the scenes it is probably making money by selling on your data for research. Companies like23andMe andAncestryDNA charge consumers under £150 to learn about their health and/or origins, while others do whole genome sequencing for a little over £1,000 (although in the US it is cheaper at just under $1,000). The model works like this: send in a saliva sample, receive the results and provided you consent, which most people do because they want to help research efforts, the company retains control of the data....

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A share in the future of DNA sequencing

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 07:30:38 +0100

Professor George Church on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies almost everybody in the population getting sequenced is reproductive decision making: who to date, who to marry, whether or not to have gamete [egg/sperm] donors. Anybody that is o...



Are you eager to please? Personality quiz

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 06:00:36 +0100

Do you tend to work to put another person at their ease, or are you happy to let things get awkward? Take these simple questions to find outChoose which statement, a) or b), best applies to you.Asked to give an impromptu speech, you:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Is the answer that we have run out of good questions? | Kenan Malik

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 00:03:29 +0100

We are supposed to be inquisitive and yet …John Brockman has run out of questions. Brockman, a literary agent, runs the science and philosophy siteEdge.org. Every year for 20 years, he has askedleading thinkers to answer a particular question, such as: “What questions have disappeared?” or: “What do you believe is true even though you cannot prove it?” This year, though, Brockman announced that he has no more questions left. So he asked his final question: “What is the last question?”“Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers,” Voltaire insisted. Questions help us define what we don’t know and force us or others to justify what we think we do know.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



How long can we treat the suffering of animals as an inconvenient truth? | Michael Brooks

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 00:02:29 +0100

A revolution is coming in our relationship with ‘lower’ creatures, provoked by a greater knowledge of their cognition. Labour’s new plans for animal welfare are just a startScientific insight is a powerful thing, but will it ever override the human lust for health, prosperity and, saddest of all, convenience? This question entered my head as I read of the Labour party ’s newly announcedpolicies for animal welfare“informed and underpinned by the latest evidence on animal sentience”. Such an approach would lead to laudable bans on foie gras imports and nonsensical badger culling. But let ’s be careful what we wish for: further down the line, it would also lead to some uncomfortable dilemmas. In fact, how we redraw our relationship with animals promises to be one of the dominant...



Breakthrough as scientists grow sheep embryos containing human cells

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 22:55:10 +0100

Advance brings us closer to growing transplant organs inside animals or being able to genetically tailor compatible organs, say researchersGrowing human organs inside other animals has taken another step away from science-fiction, with researchers announcing they have grown sheep embryos containing human cells.Scientists say growing human organs inside animals could not only increase supply, but also offer the possibility of genetically tailoring the organs to be compatible with the immune system of the patient receiving them, by using the patient ’s own cells in the procedure, removing the possibility of rejection.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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Black Panther's Powerful Vibranium Suit Explained With Real Science

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:06:17 +0100

Basically, the more he gets hit, the stronger he becomes. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)



Artwork hidden under Picasso painting revealed by x-ray

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 15:00:18 +0100

Non-invasive imaging reveals landscape painting beneath Pablo Picasso ’s The Crouching Beggar but who created it remains a mysteryWrapped in a mustard coloured blanket with a white scarf and her head on one side, Pablo Picasso ’sLa Misereuse Accroupie (The Crouching Beggar) is a study of forlorn resignation. But researchers say that there is more to desolate character than meets the eye.Beneath the mournful image lies another painting, a landscape, researchers have revealed after using non-invasive imaging techniques to examine the work.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 13:08:11 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



'Strong' Black Woman? 'Smart' Asian Man? The Downside To Positive Stereotypes

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 11:07:20 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



David Geffen School Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 09:02:42 +0100

Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,” Martin said.Zoghbi, who holds faculty appointments at Baylor in pediatrics, molecular and human genetics, neurology, and neuroscience, said she was humbled by the recognition and...

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The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | Steven Pinker

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 09:00:11 +0100

Whether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will make us think that it isEvery day the news is filled with stories about war, terrorism, crime, pollution, inequality, drug abuse and oppression. And it ’s not just the headlines we’re talking about; it’s the op-eds and long-form stories as well. Magazine covers warn us of coming anarchies, plagues, epidemics, collapses, and so many “crises” (farm, health, retirement, welfare, energy, deficit) that copywriters have had to escalate to the r edundant “serious crisis.”Whether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will interact with the nature of cognition to make us think that it is.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



New study sheds light on illegal global trade of pangolins

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Stirling) Animal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins -- one of the world's most endangered animals -- out of Central Africa, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Understanding roots opens students to science, diversity

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Penn State) Focusing science education on students through genetic and genealogical studies may be the way to increase minorities in the pipeline and engage students who would otherwise deem science too hard or too uninteresting, according to a Penn State anthropologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Newborn babies who suffered stroke regain language function in opposite side of brain

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Georgetown University Medical Center) A stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult. A study led by Georgetown University Medical Center investigators found that a decade or two after a 'perinatal' stroke damaged the left 'language' side of the brain, affected teenagers and young adults used the right sides of their brain for language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Trump's moon shot might be steered by a woman, says Nasa chief

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 04:04:52 +0100

A third of America ’s astronauts are women, says Dr Ellen Ochoa, a director at an agency that has come a long way on equalityThere is at least a one in three chance that the first human to set foot on the moon this century will be a woman, Dr Ellen Ochoa, the head of Nasa ’s Johnson space center has said.In the early 1960s Nasa sent out rejection letters saying it had no plans to send women into space. Among those who apparently received the brush-off was ateenage Hillary Clinton. But the agency has since changed its tune, and in 1983 Sally Ride became the first American woman in space. In 2013 Nasa announced thathalf of its new class of eight astronauts were women– a first for the agency.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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Medic! Ants injured while hunting for termites get help from paramedic-style triage system

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 01:10:00 +0100

Move over, ant farms — ant hospitals are where the real action is. Scientists studying the behavior of African Matabele ants in Ivory Coast have found that the insects act like paramedics in a crisis, triaging and treating the wounds of their injured peers.The discovery,described in the Proceedings... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)



Earthlings likely to welcome alien life rather than panicking, study shows

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 01:02:49 +0100

Should aliens be discovered, public reaction is likely to be positive, say researchers – despite alarming fictional portrayals of contact“The fear I felt was no rational fear, but a panic terror,” wrote HG Wells, describing his narrator’s response to a Martian invasion in War of the Worlds.But despite such alarming portrayals, researchers say the discovery of alien life is more likely to be welcomed with open arms than panic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



DTI-MRI ties lack of fitness to cognitive decline

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:22:14 +0100

With the aid of diffusion-tensor MR imaging (DTI-MRI), researchers from the...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Court rules that DTI-MRI scans are not 'junk science' DTI-MRI poses new cause for schizophrenia MRI shows concussion effects can linger in athletes MRI may predict cognitive impairment in fighters DTI-MRI sheds light on Parkinson's disease (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)



Oxford Student Wins Prize For Photo Of Atom Taken With DSLR Camera

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 21:48:55 +0100

A photo of the "small, pale blue dot" won a science photography prize in the U.K. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)



Want to monitor air pollution? Test a pigeon

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 21:00:56 +0100

Feral pigeons are exposed to the same environmental factors as humans, so help explore the affect of contaminants, say researchersPigeons might be seen as the scourge of cities, but researchers say they could help us explore both the levels and impacts of a host of toxins in the air, from lead to pesticides.Scientists say feral pigeons are a valuable way of probing contaminants in environment, since they are exposed to the same air, water, food and other factors as humans, and don ’t venture far from home.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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BD Accuses Cytek of Stealing Trade Secrets

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 20:38:41 +0100

Becton Dickinson (BD) is the latest medtech company to take a competitor to court for alleged trade secret theft. The company recently filed a lawsuit against Cytek Biosciences and nine former BD employees, claiming that when these employees left BD to work for Cytek they retained and misused BD's "valuable, highly confidential, proprietary information," including thousands of technical files they had downloaded from BD's computer systems onto removable storage media while still employed with the company. "Cytek recently hired away nearly a dozen scientists, engineers, and business people from BD and employed them to develop products that compete unfairly with their former company's product lines," BD said in the complaint. The company said it gave Cytek a list of serial numbers of unr...



'Black Panther': Science, Heroes — And How Comics Changed The World

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 20:15:24 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



FY19 Budget Request: Steeper Cuts Sought for NIST

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:39:09 +0100

The Trump administration has proposed decreasing the National Institute of Standards and Technology ’s budget by 34 percent in fiscal year 2019, a steeper cut than it sought last year. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)



How Exercise May Help Protect Your Brain From Cognitive Decline and Dementia

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 17:25:56 +0100

Older adults with poor fitness levels have more deterioration of white matter in their brains, according to a new study, compared with their fitter peers. White matter deterioration was also linked with a decline in decision-making brain function among adults with early signs of memory loss, suggesting that regular exercise may slow cognitive decline and perhaps even dementia, say the study authors. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, is not the first to suggest that exercise may help keep the brain healthy in old age. But while previous research has asked adults to self-report their fitness levels, the new paper used an objective test for cardiorespiratory fitness—measuring people’s VO2 max, a measure of how much oxygen their lungs can utilize dur...



A child's gender can be detected in their speech from age five, research says

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 17:00:52 +0100

University of Minnesota academics say boys and girls pick up speech cues from adults around them, resulting in differencesThe gender of children can be picked up from their speech from as young as five years old, researchers have revealed.While male and female children have no physiological reason for sounding different before puberty, when changes to the larynx kick in, researchers say boys and girls pick up telltale speech cues from adults around them, resulting in perceptible differences in their speech.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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E-cigarettes and the burning issues around vaping - Science Weekly podcast

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 16:58:33 +0100

Ian Sample asks: how safe is vaping? Can it help people stop smoking? And should it be available via a doctor ’s prescription?Subscribe and review onApple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud andAcast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterIf you ’re not a smoker, it may be hard to imagine the appeal of cigarettes. The idea of inhaling thousands of chemicals into your body just doesn’t seem that tempting. It’s hard to wrap your head around the addiction if you haven’t experienced it and even more difficult to appreciate how hard it i s to quit. But according to anew report released by Public Health England (PHE)electronic cigarettes are significantly safer than smoking and can offer a potential aid for smoking cessation. But how much do we really know about vaping and it...



Guilt over household chores is 'harming working women's health'

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 16:35:11 +0100

Worries over whether women are doing their ‘fair share’ has a clear impact on their health, according to a new analysisGuilt about not doing enough housework may be harming working women ’s health, according to new analysis of data from theInternational Social Survey Programme.Over a two-year period, women in 24 countries were asked to rate the amount of household chores they do each day in terms of their perceived “fair share”. They also ranked their physical health levels.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Environmental Health Matters Initiative

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 16:10:11 +0100

A large-scale effort to work across disciplines and sectors in developing lasting solutions to improve health. The Initiative brings together corporate, government, and university leaders, along with other engaged stakeholders in this field to explore the latest science, identify promising options and solutions, and create innovative pathways toward improving environmental health. (Source: PHPartners.org)



Stress in fathers may alter sperm and affect behaviour in offspring

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 16:00:50 +0100

Research shows male mice exposed to a mildly stressful event produced sperm richer in certain types of molecules called microRNAsStressed fathers may end up with changes to their sperm that could affect behaviour in their offspring, research in mice has shown.Previous work by the team found that male mice who were exposed to a mildly stressful event, such as being restrained, produced sperm that was richer in certain types of molecules called microRNAs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Weekly Postings

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:32:49 +0100

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Member Highlights: North Pocono Public Library, Moscow, PA – learn about this library’s community education series designed to address difficult life planning decisions. Is your organization working on a similar project? Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. Weekly Funding Tips: Funding Tip 1- Talk it through – through mid-April, NNLM MAR will offer weekly tips for members who intend to apply for our next round of funding. In just a few weeks we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Contact us to set up a consultat...

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As An American Tragedy Unfolds, Russian Agents Sow Discord Online

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:13:00 +0100

On Twitter, Russian trolls, bots, and influencers are seeking to deepen divides after the latest school shooting.(Image credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)



Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women linked to child obesity

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 12:00:00 +0100

A study, published inPediatric Obesity, reports that vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women may predispose their children to become obese later in life. Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)



Pituitary activity linked to fox domestication

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 12:00:00 +0100

According to a study, published inG3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, changes in gene expression in the pituitary that alter animals' reactivity to stress are linked to domestication of foxes.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)



Mindless eating: is there something rotten behind the research?

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:21:43 +0100

A storm of retractions, corrections, data irregularities and controversy over duplicate publication are destroying the credibility of Cornell ’s Food and Brand Lab. It’s time for the university to be open about what’s going onMost people probably haven ’t heard of the beleaguered marketing professor, Brian Wansink, but chances are many will know about his work. Wansink is the mind behind the concept of “mindless eating” – the idea that the unconscious decisions we make about food can have profound effects on our diet and weight. Ideas like using smaller plates to eat fewer calories are pretty much engrained in our collective common sense, and stem from Wansink’s work over the past 20 years at the University of Illinois and now at Cornell University’s “Food and Brand Lab...



Largest Buffalo Life Science Companies

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:00:00 +0100

Rank Name/ prior (*new or not ranked)/ URL WNY employees Manufacturing General business description (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)

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Second Meeting of the Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:52:17 +0100

February 22-23, 2018; Washington, DC or via webcast. (Source: HSR Information Central)



Performance-driven culture is ruining science | Anonymous Academic

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 07:30:38 +0100

I was told impact metrics could make or break careers. Instead, they broke my faith in scientific researchThe first time I heard about the impact factor I was a few weeks into my PhD. A candidate due to finish in a couple of months warned me emphatically: “It makes or breaks careers.” In my innocence, I didn’t think much about it and returned to concentrating on my research. A decade later, metrics such as these came to dominate my work and ultimately drove me to give up my permanent academic post and move into industry.Since leaving academia, I have found myself wondering about the effect of these metrics on the profession and practice of science.Related:Pressure to publish in journals drives too much cookie-cutter researchContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Walls, toxicity and explosions: How plant cells protect themselves from salinity in soil

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Carnegie Institution for Science) Roots face many challenges in the soil in order to supply the plant with the necessary water and nutrients. New work shows that one of these challenges, salinity, can cause root cells to explode if the risk is not properly sensed. Salinity has deleterious effects on plant health and limits crop yields, because salt inhibits water uptake and can be toxic for plants. But plant biologists discovered a never-before-described effect that salt has on the plant cell wall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Evolutionary origin of termite gut microbiome revealed

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Researchers have shown that the bacterial communities in termite guts came about through both inheritance and transfer between colonies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Humans will actually react pretty well to news of alien life

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Arizona State University) Hollywood has it wrong. Humans would actually react positively to news of alien life -- intelligent or microbial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)

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At AAAS, Brown explains how statistics, neuroscience improve anesthesiology

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Picower Institute at MIT) Dr. Emery Brown, an MIT neuroscientist and MGH anesthesiologist, has combined scientific and statistical methods to put the brain at the center of anesthesiology practice. By deciphering and monitoring EEG readings in real time he can more optimally dose patients under general anesthesia. He's presenting at the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting, Friday Feb. 16. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



New research: Increased stress on fathers leads to brain development changes in offspring

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Maryland School of Medicine) New research in mice has found that a father's stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



New tech for commercial Lithium-ion batteries finds they can be charged 5 times fast

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Warwick) Researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have developed a new direct, precise test of Lithium-ion batteries' internal temperatures and their electrodes potentials and found that the batteries can be safely charged up to five times faster than the current recommended charging limits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Study: Rural ranchers face less access to water during drought than urban counterparts

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Portland State University) The findings highlight a rural-urban divide and show that ranchers' access to water was neither equal nor valued during the drought in Mexico's Baja California Sur state from 2006 to 2012. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



New approaches in neuroscience show it's not all in your head

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Our own unique experiences shape how we view the world and respond to the events in our lives. But experience is highly subjective. These differences can matter, especially as a growing body of research shows that our thoughts about and interpretations of our experiences can have physical consequences in our brains and bodies, says University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Healthy Minds founder and director Richard Davidson, in a talk titled: How the Mind Informs the Brain: Depression and Well-Being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)

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UNLV study finds no testosterone changes in esports gamers

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Nevada, Las Vegas) Players of the competitive esports video game League of Legends showed no change in testosterone during game play, UNLV researchers have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Computers outperform lab rats in detecting toxic chemicals

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(SciCom - Making Sense of Science) UL, the science safety company, and Johns Hopkins University have embarked on joint research that has resulted in findings that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is superior in finding toxic substances to traditional animal testing. Beyond being more effective, UL's Cheminformatics REACHAcross ™ software computer processing can be performed in a matter of seconds and at a fraction of the cost to traditional testing methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



Penn engineers test drug transfer using placenta-on-a-chip

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have demonstrated the feasibility of their 'organ-on-a-chip' platform in studying how drugs are transported across the human placental barrier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



How to train like the world's most successful female cross-country skier

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) If you want to be as fast or as strong as the world's most decorated female winter Olympian ever, you'll have to train a lot -- more than 900 hours a year. But don't worry -- most of that training will be low intensity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



Laser scanning reveals 'lost' ancient Mexican city had as many buildings as Manhattan

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 02:40:26 +0100

Groundbreaking lidar scanning reveals the true scale of Angamuco, built by the Pur épecha from about 900ADArchaeology might evoke thoughts of intrepid explorers and painstaking digging, but in fact researchers say it is a high-tech laser mapping technique that is rewriting the textbooks at an unprecedented rate.The approach, known as light detection and ranging scanning (lidar) involves directing a rapid succession of laser pulses at the ground from an aircraft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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DataFlash: Data Horror Stories

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 23:00:40 +0100

In the spirit of Love Data Week’s 2018 theme, Data Stories, it’s important to consider cautionary tales as well as good outcomes. We should, after all, learn from our mistakes. Perhaps the best known collection of data horror stories is Dorothea Salo’s Research Data Management Horror Stories pinboard. Dorothea, a University of Wisconsin academic librarian and library-school instructor, has been pinning data tales of woe since 2010. We probably all have our own personal examples of data hell, but here are a few of my favorite themes… Submitting a grant proposal and neglecting to include a well thought out data management plan. Proposal rejected. Research flat lines. Gathering your identifiable biomedical data without adequately consulting with your Institutional Review Board (IRB)....



Nestle accused of using JUNK SCIENCE to market infant formula products to gullible women

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 22:03:31 +0100

(Natural News) Swiss food giant Nestle is coming under fire for misleading consumers using nutritional claims regarding its infant formulas. A report by the Dutch group Changing Markets Foundation and Globalization Monitor that investigated the way Nestle markets infant formula around the world found that their health claims regarding nutrition and ingredients were based on... (Source: NaturalNews.com)



FY19 Budget Request: Astrophysics and Earth Science Lose Out as NASA Pivots to Exploration

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 21:21:23 +0100

The Trump administration ’s fiscal year 2019 budget request for NASA refocuses the agency on its exploration mission. Science funding would increase under the request, but NASA would cancel its flagship Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope and pare back its Earth Science portfolio. The Planetary Science Division would see a 22 percent budget increase and is slated to oversee a new Lunar Discovery and Exploration research program. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)



In mice, a single vaccine prompts the immune system to fight breast, lung and skin cancers

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 20:30:00 +0100

In the field of regenerative medicine, induced pluripotent stem cells have a lot of neat tricks up their sleeves. One of them may be teaching the immune system how to beat back cancer.In research that could open a new frontier in the young field of cancer immunotherapy, Stanford University scientists... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)



Enhancing athletic performance on a genetic level

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 20:23:01 +0100

It’s already on WADA’s radar and gene doping may already be happening to enhance athletes’ performance, but its future is much more problematic. (Source: CBC | Health)

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Rapid radiation therapy minimizes treatment time, improves quality of life

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:58:31 +0100

Faster treatment is possible for a variety of cancers, thanks to hypofractionated radiotherapy currently being employed by doctors at Yale Medicine. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)



Science News » NIH Releases First Dataset from Unprecedented Study of Adolescent Brain Development

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:48:49 +0100

The National Institutes of Health released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)



Translating the Body: Medical Education in Southeast Asia

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:13:06 +0100

John Harley Warne, the Avalon Professor in the History of Medicine (National University of Singapore Press) (Source: Yale Science and Health News)



Mad about L.A.'s air quality? Blame common products like hairspray and paint, not just cars

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:10:00 +0100

When it comes to air quality, the products you use to smell nice or keep your kitchen clean could do just as much damage as the car you drive. A new study of the air around Los Angeles finds that consumer and industrial products now rival tailpipe emissions as a source of harmful atmospheric pollutants.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)



DIY faecal transplants carry risks including HIV and hepatitis, warn experts

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:00:23 +0100

Faecal transplants have been used in medical settings to tackle superbugs, but following YouTube videos at home is too risky, say researchersConcerns have been raised about the growing trend for DIY faecal transplants, with experts fearing such attempts could put individuals at an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis as well as conditions ranging from Parkinson ’s and multiple sclerosis to obesity and sleep disorders.Thetransfer of faeces from one human to another has gained attention as a growing number of studies have suggested links between microbes in the gut anda host of health problems, from autoimmune diseases to anxiety.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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Blood-thinning drugs designed to cut stroke risk may actually increase it

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:19:37 +0100

Scientists call for caution in prescribing anticoagulants after some patients with other conditions found to suffer more strokesBlood-thinning drugs may increase rather than cut the risk of stroke in some people over 65 who have an irregular heartbeat and also chronic kidney disease, according to a new study.The researchers are calling on doctors to be more cautious in prescribing the drugs, called anticoagulants, until there has been more research.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Young Kids Are Getting The Best Protection From Current Flu Vaccine

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:01:19 +0100

Overall, this season's vaccine is about 36 percent effective in blunting or preventing flu, health officials say. That's better than earlier predictions, and good enough to prevent flu in thousands.(Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)



The next level of driverless cars: how to solve the problem of humans falling asleep

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:00:22 +0100

Next wave of development will see drivers only expected to intervene when the car requests it, say researchersDriving down the motorway in a sw.y semi-autonomous car, the vehicle is at its own wheel, humming along smoothly. But coming off a slip road it is over to you. The only trouble is, you ’ve fallen asleep.The goal of a completely driverless car is considered top ofa six-level scale of autonomy, and researchers believe it will one day be possible to achieve that aim. But for now, cars are stuck at level two on the scale – in which the driver must still perform several key aspects of driving – while engineers work out how to crack the problem of keeping drivers alert.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Next-level driverless cars: how to solve the problem of humans falling asleep

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:00:22 +0100

Next wave of development will see drivers only expected to intervene when the car requests it, say researchersDriving down the motorway in a sw.y semi-autonomous car, the vehicle is at its own wheel, humming along smoothly. But coming off a slip road it is over to you. The only trouble is, you ’ve fallen asleep.The goal of a completely driverless car is considered top ofa six-level scale of autonomy, and researchers believe it will one day be possible to achieve that aim. But for now, cars are stuck at level two on the scale – in which the driver must still perform several key aspects of driving – while engineers work out how to crack the problem of keeping drivers alert.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



The much-maligned flu shot has reduced the risk of serious illness this year by 36%, CDC says

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:00:00 +0100

This year ’s flu shot is far from perfect, but it’s certainly better than nothing, according to anew report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Preliminary data from five sites around the country suggest that people who got vaccinated this flu season reduced their risk of getting... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)

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Scientists Just Issued a Grim New Warning on Climate Change: ‘We Are Not Prepared’

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:32:08 +0100

New research shows that countries around the world are falling short of greenhouse gas goals in the Paris climate deal, and the consequences will likely be unprecedented extreme weather. Published in the journal Science Advances this week, the study found that the likelihood of extreme heat, dryness and precipitation will increase across as much of 90% of North America, Europe and East Asia if countries do not accelerate their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. “We are not prepared for today’s climate, let alone for another degree of global warming,” says study author Noah Diffenbaugh, a Stanford University professor of earth system science. The 2015 Paris Agreement, which President Donald Trump has promised to exit when the U.S. is eligible to do so, aims to ke...



US National Science Foundation clamps down on misconduct

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:21:55 +0100

Agency will now require every grantee organization to report cases of sexual harassment (Source: PhysicsWeb News)



Study suggests expanded range for emerging tick-borne disease

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:05:13 +0100

New research led by the Yale School of Public Health suggests that Borrelia miyamotoi ’s geographic range is bicoastal, far larger than previously believed. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)



Borneo Has Lost 100,000 Orangutans Since 1999

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:03:00 +0100

That's more than the number of the critically endangered species remaining. The orangutans have been hit hard by deforestation and hunting. The animals are native to the island.(Image credit: Bay Ismoyo /AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)



Laser scanning reveals 'lost' ancient Mexican city 'had as many buildings as Manhattan'

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 16:00:19 +0100

Groundbreaking lidar scanning reveals the true scale of Angamuco, built by the Pur épecha from about 900ADArchaeology might evoke thoughts of intrepid explorers and painstaking digging, but in fact researchers say it is a high-tech laser mapping technique that is rewriting the textbooks at an unprecedented rate.The approach, known as light detection and ranging scanning (lidar) involves directing a rapid succession of laser pulses at the ground from an aircraft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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New Report Proposes Framework for Policymakers to Address Debate Over Encryption

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 16:00:00 +0100

A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposes a framework for evaluating proposals to provide authorized government agencies with access to unencrypted versions of encrypted communications and other data. The framework is the product of an 18-month study led by a diverse array of leaders from law enforcement, computer science, civil liberties, law, and other disciplines. Read More  (Source: News from the National Academies)



Aksoy Labs combats the tsetse fly to protect Africa from sleeping sickness

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 15:53:05 +0100

Yale professor of Serap Aksoy ’s work to combat sleeping sickness in Africa has included mapping the genome of the tsetse fly and developing student workshops. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)



How To Detect A Ghost (Particle)

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 15:06:39 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



A Scientific Search For A Ghost (Particle)

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 15:06:00 +0100

(Source: NPR Health and Science)



National Academies Announce Initiative on Environmental Health, Appoint Advisory Committee

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 15:00:00 +0100

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are launching an Academies-wide initiative to transform how the nation addresses the complex issues associated with environmental health— a field that examines how the environment affects human health. The initiative will bring together expertise across the institution, including environmental, medical, and social science, energy, and engineering, and involve leaders from government, corporate, and academic entities to explore the latest science, identify promising solutions, and create innovative pathways toward improving environmental health. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)

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A test of the uterine lining improves chances of a successful pregnancy

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:28:45 +0100

Dr. Harvey Kliman ’s work at the Yale School of Medicine looks at how testing for a healthy endometrium can improve fertility and reproductive outcomes. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)



Nigeria:Nigerian Student Invents Procedure That Could Revolutionise Retinal Disease Diagnosis

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:41:22 +0100

[This Day] A Nigerian doctoral student at Brunel University London's Department of Computer Science, Bashir Dodo, has won the "Best Student Paper" award at the industry-leading BIOIMAGING 2018 conference in Portugal. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)



Is an Anti-Aging Pill on the Horizon?

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:15:10 +0100

Anti-aging products from skin creams to chemical peels are part of a $250 billion industry, but scientists have yet to discover a longevity elixir that stands up to medical scrutiny. A group of researchers believe they’re getting closer, however, thanks to a compound called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD+ for short. “NAD+ is the closest we’ve gotten to a fountain of youth,” says David Sinclair, co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. “It’s one of the most important molecules for life to exist, and without it, you’re dead in 30 seconds.” NAD+ is a molecule found in all living cells and is critical for regulating cellular aging and maintaining proper function of the whole body. Lev...



How to Become Less Afraid of Death

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:15:10 +0100

Death, in the view of many theorists, is a good thing, at least for a society that aspires to be creative. When you’re on the clock, you accomplish more. Cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker, author of The Denial of Death, called mortality “a mainspring of human activity.” If you want to invent a light bulb or paint a Mona Lisa, you’d best get started, because checkout time is coming. That’s perfectly fine when you’re contemplating the human species as a whole, but our personal mortality is a different matter, right? Not always. A 2017 study in Psychological Science tallied the number of positive and negative words in blog posts written by the terminally ill and compared them with essays by people who were asked to imagine being near death and then writ...



Inside One Couple ’s Experimental Treatment to Battle Alzheimer’s Disease

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:15:10 +0100

JoAnn Wooding is staring intently at the clear liquid dripping from a dark brown IV bag into her husband Peter’s arm. “Please be the drug, please be the drug,” she says. Married for more than 50 years, the Woodings are among the more than 5 million Americans who are facing Alzheimer’s disease, one of the most devastating diagnoses today. But instead of accepting the slow descent into memory loss, confusion and dementia, Peter–who has the disease–could be among the first to successfully stop that decline from happening. Peter, 77, is one of the 2,700 people around the world who are expected to volunteer to test what researchers believe could be the first drug to halt Alzheimer’s. Two-thirds of the volunteers will receive the drug, and one-third will...

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The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:15:10 +0100

Old age demands to be taken very seriously–and it usually gets its way. It’s hard to be cavalier about a time of life defined by loss of vigor, increasing frailty, rising disease risk and falling cognitive faculties. Then there’s the unavoidable matter of the end of consciousness and the self–death, in other words–that’s drawing closer and closer. It’s the rare person who can confront the final decline with flippancy or ease. That, as it turns out, might be our first mistake. Humans are not alone in facing the ultimate reckoning, but we’re the only species–as far as we know–who spends its whole life knowing death is coming. A clam dredged from the ocean off Iceland in 2006–and inadvertently killed by the scientists who disco...



$40 Million Later, A Pioneering Plan To Boost Wild Fish Stocks Shows Little Success

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:00:19 +0100

A California program begun 35 years ago to boost waning white seabass populations became a model for other states. Now the first scientific review finds the program had a stunningly low success rate.(Image credit: Mike Shane/Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)



Ammonia emissions rise in UK, as other air pollutant levels fall

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:18:12 +0100

Levels of powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016 according to government statisticsEmissions of ammonia have been on the rise in the UK, new statistics from the government show, even while the amount of other pollutants entering the atmosphere has fallen.Levels of the powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016, the latest year for which statistics are available, according to a report published by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on Thursday morning. The rise came despite an overall fall of 10% in ammonia emissions since 1980.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:00:00 +0100

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter. (Source: The Scientist)



Four science-backed benefits of chlorella

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 11:44:57 +0100

(Natural News) As superfoods continue to grow in popularity, so too has the interest in chlorella. This deep-green alga is the close cousin of spirulina. Although both look similar at first glance, there are quite a few differences that make them distinct from each other. The biggest of these is that chlorella has a unique... (Source: NaturalNews.com)

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Friends, Romans, naked wolf-men ... why an ancient festival is still controversial

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:00:09 +0100

The annual Lupercalia festival turned society upside down – and the location of its starting point is still hotly debatedScenes from films like Gladiator and series such as HBO ’s Rome might lead you to think that the ancient Romans were liberal in their view of nudity. In fact the opposite was true. It was only during exceptional occasions that Romans were freed from their social norms – and the most spectacular occasion was the annual Lupercalia festival.From the earliest days of Rome, 15 February was reserved for this strange festival. It was so unusual that Cicero disparaged the festival as savage and uncivilised remnants of primitive times. A closer look at the rituals might explain his attitude: men of the nobility stripped down to their underwear in order to strike women with ...



Ultra-processed foods may be linked to cancer, says study

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:01:39 +0100

Findings suggest increased consumption of ultra-processed foods tied to rise in cancers, but scientists say more research is needed“Ultra-processed” foods, made in factories with ingredients unknown to the domestic kitchen, may be linked to cancer, according to a large and groundbreaking study.Ultra-processed foods include pot noodles, shelf-stable ready meals, cakes and confectionery which contain long lists of additives, preservatives, flavourings and colourings – as well as often high levels of sugar, fat and salt. They now account for half of all the food bought by families eating at home in the UK,as the Guardian recently revealed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Linda Sealy receives 2018 AAAS Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Linda Sealy, director of the Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity at Vanderbilt University, has been selected to receive the 2018 Lifetime Mentor Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The distinction honors her work in recruiting and mentoring underrepresented minority students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Geophysicists and atmospheric scientists partner to track typhoons' seismic footprints

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Princeton University) A remarkable collaboration between atmospheric science and geophysics could change the way we think about storms and seismicity, and could lead to an answer to the often-asked 'Are hurricanes getting stronger?' Princeton University's Lucia Gualtieri and Salvatore Pascale led an international team that has identified the seismic footprint of typhoons and hurricanes, which allows climate scientists to add decades to their dataset of powerful storms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Researchers challenge claims that sugar industry shifted blame to fat

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) In recent years, high-profile claims in the academic literature and popular press have alleged that the sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and emphasize instead the dangers of dietary fat. In a new article in the journal Science, historians at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the City University of New York challenge those claims through a careful examination of the evidence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)

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Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(European Society of Cardiology) Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology,1 a European Society of Cardiology journal. The authors urgently call for confirmatory studies as even residents of clean air cities could be at risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Study finds opportunity to increase opioid dependence treatment in Ontario jails

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(McMaster University) The study included completion of an online survey by 27 physicians, who reported working in 15 of 26 provincial correctional facilities for adults in Ontario. This included 10 of the 13 facilities with a population of more than 200. The study identified that about half of the physicians prescribed methadone and half prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid dependence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



How does it compare?: Hospice care at home, at assisted living facility, at nursing home

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Regenstrief Institute) A new study from Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute compares quality of hospice services provided for patients living at home, in assisted living facility and in nursing homes as perceived by family members. Findings, which reveal subtle but significant differences in perceived quality have potential to help influence priorities for improvement of quality, patient choice of hospice service provider and reimbursement for these services. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



MSU team to empower Latino farmers

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:00:00 +0100

(Michigan State University) Armed with a $600,000 grant, Michigan State University researchers will work alongside Latino migrant farmers to reshape how Michigan harvests fruit -- and cultivate a new workforce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)