Subscribe: MedWorm: Zoology
http://www.medworm.com/rss/medicalfeeds/specialities/Zoology.xml
Preview: MedWorm: Zoology

MedWorm: Zoology News



MedWorm.com provides a medical RSS filtering service. Thousands of medical RSS feeds are combined and output via different filters. This feed contains the latest news in Zoology



Last Build Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2017 02:25:14 +0100

 



Chester Zoo successfully breeds rare Catalan newt

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 15:06:52 +0100

Twelve Montseny newts – one of world’s rarest amphibians - hatched as part of joint breeding project with Catalan authoritiesConservationists at Chester Zoo have successfully bred one of the world ’s rarest amphibians – the Catalan newt – in an attempt to save it from extinction.The zoo is the first organisation outside Catalonia to become involved in the breeding project for the newt, the rarest amphibian in Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




A moment that changed me: seeing my first moth fish | Fiona Gell

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:33:00 +0100

I was 22 and fascinated by fish behaviour. But when scientist Amanda Vincent showed me this strange creature I became convinced that my future lay in conservation — not in the labLike many of the most important occasions in my life, the moment that changed me involved fish. Holding the desiccated carcass of a sea moth while talking to my heroine, the fish biologist and conservationistDr Amanda Vincent, altered the course of my life.I was 22, and had just finished my biology degree. For my dissertation research I had spent a couple of months following butterflyfish in the Ras Mohammed national park in the Egyptian Red Sea. I had grown to recognise them by their individual markings and, by snorkelling at a discreet distance, I had mapped their territories and recorded their daily routine.C...



Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families

Tue, 07 Nov 2017 13:00:12 +0100

Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the lifesaving parenteral nutrition (PN) support he needs to grow and thrive. Microvillus inclusion disease is a genetic condition of the intestines that causes severe diarrhea and the inability to abso...



What Darwin ’s theories tell us about the shape alien life will take

Fri, 03 Nov 2017 13:09:50 +0100

All aliens must evolve, says a new study from scientists at the University of Oxford – and that gives us something to look for“It’s life, Jim, but not as we know it.” How many times did we hear Mr Spock say this back in the day when classic Star Trek ruled the airwaves?* What always interested me back then was how did he know that it was life if it was so barely recognisable by Earthly (or Vulcan) standards?Turns out a group of scientists from the zoology department at the University of Oxford may have the answer. Don ’t look for faces, eyes, limbs or any of the large-scale things that are so familiar to life on Earth. Don’t look at the chemistry either. Instead, look for the hallmarks of natural selection.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



New species of orangutan discovered in Sumatra – and is already endangered

Thu, 02 Nov 2017 16:00:01 +0100

Scientists identify new species of great ape,Pongo tapanuliensis or Tapanuli orangutan, but fear its survival is already in doubt as habitat under threatA new species of great ape has been discovered, according to scientists studying a small population of orangutans in northern Sumatra.Among the great apes – a group that also includes humans, gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos – orangutans are our most distant relative. Since 2001, two distinct species have been recognised: the Bornean (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatran (Pongo abelii) orangutans. Now, it seems, there is a third.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cells

Thu, 26 Oct 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Lomonosov Moscow State University) A scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, explained frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis -- development of organisms from unfertilized egg cells -- in insects. Studying this phenomenon is needed to successfully control species that cause damage to agriculture. The results were published in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Dreaming of a cure: the battle to beat narcolepsy

Sun, 22 Oct 2017 07:00:45 +0100

A global struggle to find the cause of the rare condition that causes uncontrollable sleepiness has a long and strange history, but there ’s hope of a cure at handOne of my first jobs was to keep a lookout for lions. There are some occupations that are not suitable for someone with untreated narcolepsy and this is probably one of them. I was 22, a recent zoology graduate studying meerkats in the Kalahari desert in South Africa. We worked in pairs, one of us on foot, walking with meerkats, the other in the jeep scanning the horizon for danger. On many occasions, I awoke with the imprint of the steering wheel on my forehead, realising that meerkats and colleague had wandered out of sight. I would look for signs of life and, as the panic grew, signs of death. I can tell this story now only ...



Not so nasty: dinosaurs liked to snuggle up and socialise

Sat, 21 Oct 2017 23:05:36 +0100

Fossil discovered after 70 million years shows Jurassic group sleeping peacefully togetherThe three young dinosaurs had snuggled together to sleep when disaster struck. A thick layer of ash or soil, probably from a volcanic eruption or sand storm, poured over them and the animals, each the size of a large dog, died within minutes.For 70 million years they lay entombed, cradled beside each other within a slab of rock, until US scientists uncovered their remains earlier this year. Subsequent analysis of the fossilised bones – which come from the Gobi desert – reveal the first known example of roosting among dinosaurs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Warning of 'ecological Armageddon' after dramatic plunge in insect numbers

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 18:00:01 +0100

Three-quarters of flying insects in nature reserves across Germany have vanished in 25 years, with serious implications for all life on Earth, scientists sayThe abundance of flying insects has plunged by three-quarters over the past 25 years, according to a new study that has shocked scientists.Insects are an integral part of life on Earth as both pollinators and prey for other wildlife and it was known that some speciessuch as butterflies were declining. But the newly revealed scale of the losses to all insects has prompted warnings that the world is “on course for ecological Armageddon”, with profound impacts on human society.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



What sound do pandas make? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Jules Howard

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 07:00:05 +0100

Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesA great frustration for those who study natural history is that the sounds made by almost every extinct creature that ever lived will never be heard by human ears. The best we know of the call of thedodo, for instance, is that, perhaps, its name was an onomatopoeic allusion to a two-noted pigeon-like “cooo”. Likewise, the best we know of thegreat auk, a flightless penguin-like bird of the northern hemisphere, is that it may or may not have made a “gurgling noise when anxious”. My favourite of these extinct sounds is that of theHuia, a charming long-billed New Zealand bird which, although last seen in 1907, managed to stow its song into m...



Duck egg blue and oviraptor green: study reconstructs colour of dinosaur eggs

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 05:00:03 +0100

A new study of oviraptor eggshell fragments shows remarkable similarities between the reproductive biology of dinosaurs and birdsBird eggs come in a variety of colours. From the creamy and chalky whites in doves and pigeons to spotted yellow lapwing eggs and brown chicken eggs, to the blues of blackbirds and American robins. The striking colours and patterns have inspired artists, scientists and home decor makers fromAristotle tohigh-end jewellers. Thanks to palaeontology, we can now add oviraptor blue-green to the spectrum.Remarkably, only two chemical compounds bring about the whole spectrum of bird egg coloration and patterning: reddish-brown protoporphyrin IX and green-blue biliverdin. Both pigments have distinctly different chemical properties, and whereas biliverdin is distributed th...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Keeping moving -- flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancer

Tue, 03 Oct 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Oxford) A new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.Researchers from the Aboobaker lab in the Department of Zoology used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. By understanding how stem cells are programmed to move, what activates them and how they follow a correct path, researchers may be able to design new treatments for cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)



Meet the New Spider Species Named After Bernie Sanders

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 15:40:28 +0100

What do Bernie Sanders, Barack Obama Michelle Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio and David Bowie have in common? Thanks to researchers at the University of Vermont, they all have a new species of spider named after them. Researchers gave the celebrity names to a group of tiny yellow spiders originally thought to be the same species. The Spintharus berniesandersi, for instance, is a tiny spider found in Cuba that measures just a millimeter long. Courtesy of Ingi Agnarsson/Agnarsson Lab Professor Ingi Agnarsson, who led the research project, explained to Sci-News why they gave the eight-legged creatures such recognizable names: “The students and I wanted to honor people who stood up for both human rights and warned about climate change — leaders and artists who promoted sensible approache...



Caribbean spiders named for Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders David Bowie, and others

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society has identified and named 15 new species of spider in the Caribbean. Given the vernacular names 'smiley faced' spiders due to the distinctive markings on their backs, the new species have been given names including S. davidattenboroughi, S. barackobamai, and S.leonardodicaprioi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



The Naked Ape at 50: ‘Its central claim has surely stood the test of time ‘

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 06:30:38 +0100

In October 1967, Desmond Morris published his landmark study of human behaviour and evolution. Here four experts assess what he got right – and wrongProfessor of evolutionary psychology at the University of OxfordContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs deaf to their own mating calls

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:15:56 +0100

Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Vegetarian dinosaurs sometimes strayed for a shellfish snack – study

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 02:33:36 +0100

Analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceansSome dinosaurs may not have been the strict vegetarians that palaeontologists thought they were.New analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceans, according to a new study published Thursday in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs that are deaf to their own mating calls

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:07:14 +0100

Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasites

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Wiley) New research indicates that fish may adapt their behavior to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Welfare of zoo animals set to improve

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Surrey) The wellbeing of zoological animals is set to improve following the successful trial of a new welfare assessment grid, a new study in the journal Veterinary Record reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)



Fathers can influence the sex of their offspring, scientists show

Mon, 11 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Oxford) It has traditionally been thought that in mammals only mothers are able to influence the sex of their offspring.But a new study in wild mice led by Dr Aurelio Malo of Oxford University's Department of Zoology has shown that fathers can, in fact, influence sex ratios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Hope for improving protection of the reticulated python

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Trading in skins of the reticulated python is such a lucrative business that illegal exports are rising sharply and existing trade restrictions are being circumvented on a large scale. This is endangering the stability of populations. Therefore, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Royal Zoological Society Scotland are developing genetic methods for tracking down individual origins and potential trade routes of the skins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Chilesaurus is the dinosaur discovery of the century | Brian Switek

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 09:36:01 +0100

This herbivorous creature could be the missing link in the dinosaur family tree, changing everything we think we know about their evolutionChilesaurus doesn ’t look like the kind of dinosaur that would kick up much of a fuss. The Jurassic saurian – named for the country, not the tasty peppers – was a small, bipedal herbivore that munched on plants over 150m years ago. It didn’t have nasty teeth, crazy horns, or the immense body size that typical ly launch the careers of Mesozoic celebrities. The creature’s secret is more subtle, and plays into a controversial reshuffling of the dinosaur family tree.Related:'Most bizarre dinosaur ever found' is missing evolutionary link – studyContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Monster mash: does the Frankenstein dinosaur solve the mystery of the Jurassic family tree?

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 14:57:05 +0100

Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, named after the seven-year-old who discovered it, changes everything we thought we knew about dino evolution …Name: Chilesaurus diegosuarezi.Nickname: The Frankenstein dinosaur.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Fish confusing plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 05:30:31 +0100

Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Fish mistaking plastic debris in ocean for food, study finds

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 05:30:31 +0100

Behavioural evidence suggests marine organisms are not just ingesting microplastics by accident but actively seeking them out as foodFish may be actively seeking out plastic debris in the oceans as the tiny pieces appear to smell similar to their natural prey, new research suggests.The fish confuse plastic for an edible substance because microplastics in the oceans pick up a covering of biological material, such as algae, that mimics the smell of food, according to thestudy published on Wednesdayin the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Sir Patrick Bateson obituary

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 12:07:19 +0100

Leading scientist who focused on the biological origins of animal behaviourSir Patrick Bateson, who has died aged 79, was a scientist whose work advanced the understanding of the biological origins of behaviour. He will also be remembered as a man of immense warmth and kindness, whose success as a leader, teacher and administrator of science owed much to his collaborative spirit, generosity and good humour.He was a key figure in ethology – the biological study of animal behaviour. As well as being a conceptual thinker who revelled in painting the big theoretical picture, he was an accomplished experimental scientist. He published extensively, with more than 300 journal papers and several books to his name.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNA

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Oxford) A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)



Wildlife royalties -- a future for conservation?

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Oxford) Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?That is the question asked in new research conducted by zoologists from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 06:00:12 +0100

Since the early 19th century, artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes fictional – dinosaurs and prehistoric environments, mingling science with unbridled fantasy. This art is the subject of a new book: PaleoartContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Too many bats are being killed for research

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Wiley) The work of zoologists worldwide is often an important asset for biodiversity protection, but a new article notes that scientists kill many bats -- even of threatened species -- to study them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Scientists unlock planthoppers' potential to control future crop disease outbreaks

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(eLife) Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Zoology have discovered how a severe rice virus reproduces inside the small brown planthopper, a major carrier of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Strong performance in Journal Citation Reports reaffirms Wiley as leading society publishing partner

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 14:04:12 +0100

Wiley’s performance in the 2017 release of Clarivate Analytics’ Journal Citation Reports (JCR) remains strong, maintaining its position as #3 in terms of the number of titles indexed, articles published and citations received. Overall, 1,214 Wiley journals were included in the reports (+9 from last year), of which 57% were society publications – strengthening Wiley’s position as the world’s leading society publishing partner. Wiley journals were ranked #1 in 26 subject categories, and achieved 363 top-10 category rankings. Particular success stories include the continued high performance of CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians (retaining its #1 spot across the entire JCR with an Impact Factor of 187.04), and the successful separation of the American Geophysical Union’s Journal of...



Tardigrades: Earth ’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic cataclysm

Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:23:27 +0100

Microscopic creatures reassure scientists complete eradication of life on the planet is extremely unlikelyWhether it is a supernova or an asteroid impact, should a cosmic calamity strike, it seems there will be at least one form of life left: a tubby, microscopic animal with the appearance of a crumpled hoover bag.The creatures, known as tardigrades, are staggeringly hardy animals, a millimetre or less in size, with species living in wet conditions that range from mountain tops to chilly ocean waters to moss and lichen on land.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



'Truly unique': lioness adopts and nurses leopard cub

Fri, 14 Jul 2017 11:22:29 +0100

No wild cat has ever been observed nursing a cub from another species – the event may be the result of the Tanzanian lioness having lost her own litterA lioness has been spotted nursing a tiny leopard cub in Tanzania, the first time a wild cat is known to have adopted a cub from another species.The five-year old lioness, called Nosikitok is closely monitored by conservationists in the Ngorongoro conservation area and is known to have had a litter of her own in mid to late June.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



So long, Dippy: museum's blue whale seeks to inspire love of living world

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 16:10:50 +0100

Natural History Museum in London signals urgency of wildlife crisis by replacing dinosaur centrepiece with species alive todayIn the hot summer of 1976, when Richard Sabin was 10, he went on a trip with his Birmingham primary school to theNatural History Museum in London. Blown away by the scale of what he was seeing, the wide-eyed schoolboy was told by an attendant that if he wanted to see something really big he should make his way to the mammal hall, where the skeletons of a number of whales, including an enormous blue whale, were displayed.“Another gallery attendant went past, and I stopped her and said, ‘Are these real?’” recalls Sabin. “And she said, ‘Yes they are. They’re the real skeletons of animals that still live in our oceans today.’ That was the sentence that r...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy

Tue, 11 Jul 2017 00:02:27 +0100

Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without traveling to Washington, DC. Participants may either invite their elected officials to visit their research facility or can meet at the policymaker’s local office. AIBS...



When very hungry caterpillars turn into cannibals

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 15:00:29 +0100

Research shows that defensive chemicals emitted by plants cause armyworms to turn on each otherCaterpillars turn into cannibals and eat each other when plants deploy defensive chemicals to make their foliage less appetising, research has revealed.While it was already known that caterpillars of many species munch on each other, and that plants have a range of defence mechanisms, it was not clear whether the two were linked.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Dr. Carl Clark, Mental Health Center of Denver (Video)

Thu, 06 Jul 2017 20:45:00 +0100

Carl Clark never planned to be the CEO of anything, but today he ’s the president and CEO of the Mental Health Center of Denver. As a young man, Clark was interested in anything that got him outdoors, so he studied zoology in college. It wasn’t until he had decided to pursue psychology instead that he found out about his dad’s bipolar disorder. “I feel like we got lucky, my family, that my dad got access to [mental health] services, because not a lot of people do,” Clark said. “In fact,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)



Feathered dinosaurs from China visit the UK | Susannah Lydon

Wed, 05 Jul 2017 15:21:21 +0100

An exhibition including iconic – and infamous – feathered dinosaur specimens comes to Europe for the first timeFeathered dinosaurs are rarely out of the news and area regular topic for our blog. For those in the UK, there ’s a rare opportunity to see some of the original feathered dinosaur specimens this summer in Nottingham.The exhibition – Dinosaurs of China: Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyers – opened on 1 July at Wollaton Hall, home of theNottingham Natural History Museum. The ground-shaking sauropodMamenchisaurus, mounted 13.5m tall in a rearing pose, is a spectacular centrepiece. But, from a scientific perspective, it ’s the much smaller dinosaur specimens, from the 125-million-year-old Jehol biota, that are the real stars of the show.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Bone to pick: volunteers invited to rebuild 157-year-old whale skeleton

Wed, 05 Jul 2017 06:00:06 +0100

Whale Weekender at Grant Zoology Museum calls on public to clean then reassemble bones of 8-metre mammalThe public is invited to help reassemble a giant jigsaw in a London museum, 157 years after two Somerset fishermen went out to catch a “great fish” and brought back a northern bottlenosed whale more than eight metres (26ft) long.Their catch was a local sensation: the carcass went on a west country tour then the skeleton was displayed for years hanging from the ceiling of the museum in Weston-super-Mare.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Dinosaur skeleton discovered under Surrey brick factory

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 22:04:35 +0100

Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigationThe near-complete fossilised skeleton of a dinosaur, thought to have lived about 132m years ago, has been unearthed at a brick factory in Surrey.Paleontologists say they discovered the bones during a routine visit to the site of the Wienerberger quarry in February. The first clues came when the team looked at rock that had been turned up by a bulldozer at the site and discovered a couple of tail vertebrae.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Rare dinosaur remains discovered under Surrey brick factory

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 12:10:00 +0100

Near-complete fossilised skeleton of 132m-year-old creature, believed to be an Iguanodon, has been taken to special laboratory for further investigationThe near-complete fossilised skeleton of a dinosaur, thought to have lived about 132m years ago, has been unearthed at a brick factory in Surrey.Paleontologists say they discovered the bones during a routine visit to the site of the Wienerberger quarry in February. The first clues came when the team looked at rock that had been turned up by a bulldozer at the site and discovered a couple of tail vertebrae.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Pesticides damage survival of bee colonies, landmark study shows

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 18:00:17 +0100

The world ’s largest ever field trial demonstrates widely used insecticides harm both honeybees and wild bees, increasing calls for a banWidely used insecticides damage the survival of honeybee colonies, the world ’s largest ever field trial has shown for the first time, as well as harming wild bees.The farm-based research, along with a second new study, also suggests widespread contamination of entire landscapes and a toxic “cocktail effect” from multiple pesticides.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Dinosaurs ’ sensitive snouts enabled courtship ‘face stroking’, study suggests

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 23:01:14 +0100

Fossilised skull scans reveal neurovascular canal that might have enabled precision-feeding, and face-biting ‘to make a point’Dinosaurs ’ faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought and may have helped them feed more carefully or woo potential mates, according to new research.Experts from the University of Southampton used advanced X-ray and 3D-imaging techniques to look inside the fossilised skull ofNeovenator salerii– a large carnivorous land-based dinosaur found on the Isle of Wight, and found evidence that it possessed an extremely sensitive snout of a kind previously only associated with aquatic feeders.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 22:05:23 +0100

Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without traveling to Washington, DC. Participants may either invite their elected officials to visit their research facility or can meet at the policymaker’s local office. AIBS...



The week in wildlife – in pictures

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:22:40 +0100

Bison, bluebells, bumble bees and beavers are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Life won't find a way: how an ostrich fossil halted plans for a real-life Jurassic Park | Elsa Panciroli

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:00:24 +0100

Despite dinosaurs having met extinction long ago, our dreams of reviving them refuse to die. Recent events imply we may have to settle for resurrecting poultryThere are some ideas that just won ’t die. Like the villain in a movie, even when they’ve been shot with the bullets of refutation, scalded by heated discourse, and pushed off into the pool of disproven theories, these ideas still claw their way back, bedraggled and screaming, to attack us one more time.If there is one idea in palaeontology that typifies this tiresome cycle, it is the resurrection of the dinosaurs. “Can we ever bring them back?” it is so often asked. Despite scientists repeatedly saying no, the question lives on. This is due in part to the rehashing of a handful of studies that seemed for a moment to offer pr...



What if dinosaurs were still alive? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Brian Switek

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:00:24 +0100

Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesDinosaurs dominated terrestrial life on this planet for over 130m years. If it hadn ’t been for a wayward asteroid, the reign of Tyrannosaurus rex and its ilk could have lasted for at least another 66m. In fact, let’s presume for a moment that thecosmic boulder that ended the Cretaceous period totally missed Earth and allowed dinosaurs to survive to the present. What would life be like now?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



'We're her sort of mum': behind the scenes at Taronga zoo | photo-essay

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 19:00:15 +0100

We join the keepers at Sydney ’s Taronga zoo as they nurture and train their newest arrivals, including Maiya the red panda and Kamini the pygmy hippo. A photo-essay by Jonny WeeksLily and Blossom are about to be toilet trained at Taronga zoo. The two young sugar gliders are curled up together inside a wooden box within a staff bathroom while trainer Suzie Lemon is trying to coax them out with the promise of a sugary, sap-like treat. Lily eventually emerges and promptly pees all over the floor but Lemon doesn ’t seem to mind. After all, they’re not here for that kind of toilet training.“We’re training them to glide over to us on cue to demonstrate their natural gliding behaviour,” Lemon explains. “We needed an enclosed space, somewhere with four solid walls, because in future...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




'We're sort of her mum': behind the scenes at Taronga zoo | photo-essay

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 19:00:15 +0100

We join the keepers at Sydney ’s Taronga zoo as they nurture and train their newest arrivals, including Maiya the red panda and Kamini the pygmy hippo. A photo-essay by Jonny WeeksLily and Blossom are about to be toilet trained at Taronga zoo. The two young sugar gliders are curled up together inside a wooden box within a staff bathroom while trainer Suzie Lemon is trying to coax them out with the promise of a sugary, sap-like treat. Lily eventually emerges and promptly pees all over the floor but Lemon doesn ’t seem to mind. After all, they’re not here for that kind of toilet training.“We’re training them to glide over to us on cue to demonstrate their natural gliding behaviour,” Lemon explains. “We needed an enclosed space, somewhere with four solid walls, because in future...



Taylor & Francis partners with The Conversation Africa to boost engagement with African research

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 15:00:07 +0100

Taylor & Francis and The Conversation Africa announce a new partnership to facilitate African researchers increasing public engagement with their work and expertise. By acting as Funding Partner, Taylor & Francis will work with The Conversation Africa to highlight essential African research and offer T&F authors, journal editors, and publishing partners closer links with the African news website. The Conversation is an international network of news websites, addressing the news agenda from an academic perspective. TC-Africa was established in 2015, joining Conversation websites in Australia, the UK, France and the US into a global newsroom dedicated to transforming knowledge from universities and research institutions into concise, readable articles. After just two years, TC-Af...



Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 21:08:43 +0100

Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without traveling to Washington, DC. Participants may either invite their elected officials to visit their research facility or can meet at the policymaker’s local office. AIBS...



William 'Skip' Baker Joins White River Medical Center (Movers & Shakers)

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 06:23:12 +0100

Dr. William "Skip" Baker has been hired as medical director and Dr. Danyale Wallace has been appointed assistant medical director in the emergency department at White River Medical Center in Batesville. Baker previously was the director of emergency services and trauma and an emergency department physician at NEA Baptist Memorial Hospital in Jonesboro. Baker earned a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree from Arkansas State University in Jonesboro and received his medical degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. He also completed a three-year residency in emergency medicine at UAMS in Little Rock. Wallace was previously the assistant facility medical director at NEA Baptist Memorial Hospital. Wallace completed her undergraduate degree in sociology and...



Epigenetic signaling axis regulates proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem/progenitor cells

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) In a recent study published in Stem Cell Reports, a team led by Drs. LIU Changmei and TENG Zhaoqian from the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, found a novel epigenetic signaling axis (composed of PRC1, microRNA, and PRC2) that regulates self-renewal and proliferation of NSPCs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




How the Galapagos cormorant lost its ability to fly

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 19:30:00 +0100

The flightless Galapagos cormorant is one of a diverse array of animals that live on the Galapagos Islands, which piqued Charles Darwin ’s scientific curiosity in the 1830s. He hypothesized that altered evolutionary pressures may have contributed to the loss of the ability to fly in birds like the Galapagos cormorant.In a new study unraveling the cormorant ’s DNA, UCLA scientists discovered genetic changes that transpired during the past 2 million years and contributed to the bird’s inability to fly. Interestingly, when these same genes go awry in humans, they cause bone-development disorders called skeletalciliopathies.Published today in the journal Science, the findings shed light on the genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of limb size and could eventually lead to new treat...



An Endangered Lizard From Indonesia May Hold The Key To Treating Superbugs

Tue, 30 May 2017 19:33:52 +0100

Komodo dragons, the 10-foot, 300-pound lizards found in Indonesia, do not bite humans unless attacked, but when they do, it can prove deadly. Not only is the venom in their teeth potentially fatal, they may also harbor bacteria in their mouths that is dangerous to their prey (typically, deer and pigs). The question of whether Komodo dragons deliver fatal bacterial infections to their prey when they bite has been somewhat controversial: A 2013 study, refuting previously accepted common wisdom, swabbed the mouths of 16 captive Komodo dragons and found they had less bacteria than other predators, such as lions.  Nonetheless, Komodo dragons in the wild eat carrion and live in environments rich in bacteria yet rarely become infected, though local prey such as water buffalo do. And one reas...



An Imperiled Indonesian Lizard May Hold The Key To Fighting Superbugs

Tue, 30 May 2017 19:33:52 +0100

Komodo dragons, the 10-foot, 300-pound lizards found in Indonesia, do not bite humans unless attacked, but when they do, it can prove deadly. Not only is the venom in their teeth potentially fatal, they may also harbor bacteria in their mouths that is dangerous to their prey (typically, deer and pigs). The question of whether Komodo dragons deliver fatal bacterial infections to their prey when they bite has been somewhat controversial: A 2013 study, refuting previously accepted common wisdom, swabbed the mouths of 16 captive Komodo dragons and found they had less bacteria than other predators, such as lions.  Nonetheless, Komodo dragons in the wild eat carrion and live in environments rich in bacteria yet rarely become infected, though local prey such as water buffalo do. And one reas...



Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy

Tue, 30 May 2017 17:08:21 +0100

Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without traveling to Washington, DC. Participants may either invite their elected officials to visit their research facility or can meet at the policymaker’s local office. AIBS...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




The week in wildlife – in pictures

Fri, 26 May 2017 13:00:12 +0100

Herons in flight, an inquisitive marmot and a blue whale are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Here be dragons: the million-year journey of the Komodo dragon | Hanneke Meijer

Wed, 17 May 2017 11:09:54 +0100

Far from being the special result of insular evolution, Komodo dragons are the last survivors of a group of huge lizards that ranged over much of AustralasiaIn 1910, Lieutenant Jacques Karel Henri van Steyn van Hensbroek was stationed onFloresIsland in eastern Indonesia within the Dutch colonial administration, when he received word of a “land crocodile” of unusually large size living on the nearby island ofKomodo. Intrigued, he set out to Komodo to investigate for himself. He returned with a photo and the skin of the animal, which he sent to Pieter Ouwens, then director of the Java Zoological Museum and Botanical Gardens in Buitenzorg (now Bogor). The animal was not a crocodile of any sort, but a large monitor lizard. Ouwens realised that this animal was new to science and published t...



Alberta museum unveils world's best-preserved armoured dinosaur

Mon, 15 May 2017 18:12:42 +0100

Fossil of 18ft nodosaur found in 2011 in Alberta ’s tar sands goes on display after 7,000 hours of reconstruction workIt has been compared to a dinosaur mummy, a lifelike sculpture and even a dragon from Game of Thrones.Now, 110 million years after it died, the 18ft-long nodosaur – hailed as the best-preserved armoured dinosaur in the world – has been unveiled at a Canadian museum.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Dental Hygiene KOL Patti DiGangi, RDH Publishes the ROMA* Manual on Dentistry

Mon, 15 May 2017 17:30:00 +0100

Part of the DentalCodeology Series, the New Book is a Light Hearted,Yet Deadly Serious Look at the Dental ProfessionAddison, IL – May 09, 2017 – Patti DiGangi, RDH, BS, a prominent dental hygiene thought leader, took a totally different approach when writing the latest book in her DentalCodeology Series.She and co-author Dr. Benson Baty took a humorous approach in examining some of the observations, insights and urban legends associated with patient communications, dental team interactions and clinical practice.“You can’t make this stuff up,” says DiGangi. “I think everyone who has worked a few years in a dental office has a ROMA book in them!” If you think ROMA stands forResultsOrientedManagement andAccountability, think again.Those with a military background may recognize t...



Meet with Your Lawmakers This Summer and Help Inform Science Policy

Mon, 15 May 2017 16:06:10 +0100

Registration is now open for the 2017 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences, is an opportunity for biologists across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research. Now in its ninth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elected officials without traveling to Washington, DC. Participants may either invite their elected officials to visit their research facility or can meet at the policymaker’s local office. AIBS...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 years

Fri, 05 May 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Pensoft Publishers) Little does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas. However, Vladimir Lukhtanov, a biologist at the Zoological Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, made a startling discovery: a new, beautiful butterfly named Acentria's fritillary, which was spotted as it flew over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel. It is described in the open access journal Comparative Cytogenetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



Feeding strategies in competing hummingbird species observed in a small area in Brazil

Tue, 02 May 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Pensoft Publishers) Being the vertebrates with the highest metabolic rate thanks to their rapid wing flaps, the hummingbirds have evolved various feeding behaviors. While they tend to go for food high in energy, strong competition affects greatly their preferences and behavior towards either dominance, obedience, traplining or a strategy named hide-and-wait, conclude Brazilian scientists after observing several species of hummingbirds over the span of six months. Their conclusions are published in the open access journal Zoologia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Mass die-offs accelerate across the planet, by 2020 two-thirds of wild animals will be wiped out

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 11:36:40 +0100

(Natural News) The planet’s animal population is rapidly dwindling, with about two-thirds expected to be wiped out by 2020, a recent analysis revealed. To carry out the study, researchers from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) compiled data on animal population and found that it declined by 57 percent between 1970 and 2012.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)



Bow wow: scientists create definitive canine family tree

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:12:11 +0100

Study sheds light on breed evolution and why certain types of dog are prone to the same diseases despite appearing to be very differentIt sounds like the ultimate shaggy dog story, but scientists say they have created the definitive canine family tree.The study not only sheds light on the evolution of different breeds, but also reveals why certain breeds are prone to the same diseases even though they appear to be very different.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Plastic-eating worms could help wage war on waste

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 01:05:18 +0100

Wax moth larvae are usually bred as fish bait, but a chance discovery has revealed their taste for plastic – which could be used to beat polluting plasticFor caterpillars that are bred as premium fish bait, it must rank as a better life. Rather than dangling on the end of a hook and wondering what comes next, the grubs are set to join the war on plastic waste.The larvae of wax moths are sold as delicious snacks for chub, carp and catfish, but in the wild the worms live on beeswax, making them the scourge of beekeepers across Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog

Mon, 24 Apr 2017 17:50:07 +0100

Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea highland wild dog, an animal whose existence had not been verified in almost 30 years, is a story as complex as McIntyre’s own. Trained as a zoologist, McIntyre has...



Sweet? Naked mole rats can survive without oxygen using plant sugar tactic

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 02:01:52 +0100

The subterranean rodents are able to switch to a fructose-based metabolic system previously only observed in plants, a new study revealsThey feel no pain, don ’t get cancer and look like baggy-skinned sausages with teeth: the naked mole rat is already famously weird. Now scientists have discovered what could be the subterranean rodents’ strangest trait yet: they can survive without oxygen by switching to a metabolic strategy normally used by plants.By switching from a glucose-based metabolic system, which depends on oxygen, to one that uses fructose instead, mole rats can cope with nearly twenty minutes in air with 0% oxygen. Under the same conditions, a human would die within minutes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



How the humble fly can help to solve our most gruesome crimes

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 08:58:40 +0100

Flies are often the first visitors to a murder scene. Studying their grisly dining habits can reveal vital clues to help catch the killerFlies are regarded by most people as a nuisance at best, a harbinger of death at worst. They elicit little more than feelings of disgust and many people are happy to kill them without a second thought. But there is another side to the story. The fly is one of nature ’s great marvels and, perhaps, the criminologist’s best friend.In addition to familiar forensic clues such as fingerprints, tell-tale hairs and bloodstains, more and more criminal investigators are relying on the services of the humble fly. Forensic entomology is the technical term for using insects to help us solve crimes. Given the nature of the things flies choose to dine on, they are o...



The week in wildlife – in pictures

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 17:14:24 +0100

Ducks, red deer, cherry blossoms and leopards in the hill forests of Myanmar are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Dive into the twilight zone off Easter Island reveals new species

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 06:45:34 +0100

A diving expedition off Easter Island (or Rapa Nui) in the Pacific pushes the boundaries of both technology and the human body to reveal a world of unique species just waiting to be discoveredContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Don Thomas obituary

Tue, 04 Apr 2017 15:27:21 +0100

My father, Don Thomas, who has died aged 88, was inspired to take up an academic life as a biologist, by his childhood love of the rivers, mountains and wildlife of Ceredigion in Wales.He was born at Llangeitho, a village near the market town of Tregaron, and attended Tregaron grammar school. He was always very grateful for the way that the school helped him to expand his horizons academically. By 1954 he had been awarded a BSc in zoology and a PhD from the University of Wales at Aberystwyth, where he met his future wife, Joy Robinson. They married the following year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Bloodthirsty chomp-monster or sensitive lover? Time to rethink Tyrannosaurus rex | Brian Switek

Mon, 03 Apr 2017 09:22:41 +0100

No other dinosaur has sunk its teeth so deeply into our imagination, yet the focus on its hunting means we ’re surprised to discover it was a real, living animalWe ’re over 66 million years too late to know what tyrannosaurus mating rituals entailed. Whether the immense carnivores courted like oversized albatrosses, offered gifts of semi-rotted triceratops meat, or simply got down to business without pretence is a vignette lost toCretaceous time. But research published last week in the journalScientific Reports has spurred headlines suggesting that the great and powerfulT. rex might have been a sensitive lover.The new study – perhaps to the chagrin of the authors – was not specifically aboutT. rex itself. Carthage College palaeontologist Thomas Carr and colleagues described a new s...



Brazilian Zoologia joins Pensoft's portfolio of open access journals

Mon, 03 Apr 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Pensoft Publishers) In a new partnership between Sociedade Brasileira de Zoologia and academic publisher Pensoft, one of the most prestigious scientific journals in South America, Zoologia joins Pensoft's portfolio of open access peer-reviewed journals. Zoologia is to be published on the innovative and technologically advanced ARPHA platform, developed by Pensoft, and follow its traditional format, providing modern design, intuitive interface, and a lot of high-tech perks for all authors, readers and editors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Tyrannosaurus rex was a sensitive lover, new dinosaur discovery suggests

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 14:35:26 +0100

Tyrannosaurs had sensitive snouts that they may have enjoyed rubbing together while mating, scientists sayIt made its name by terrorising Earth at the end of the Late Cretaceous, but Tyrannosaurus rex had a sensitive side too, researchers have found.The fearsome carnivore, which stood 20 feet tall and ripped its prey to shreds with dagger-like teeth, had a snout as sensitive to touch as human fingertips, say scientists.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Panda personality traits may play a significant part in breeding success

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(Zoological Society of San Diego) According to a study published in Biological Conservation,   an international peer-reviewed journal in the discipline of   conservation biology, personality traits may play a large part in the mating behaviors of the giant panda--and breeding successes or failures may depend on whether a bear's disposition is complementary to that of its prospective mate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




Pigs' teeth and hippo poo: behind the scenes at London zoo

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:30:31 +0100

The Zoological Society of London zoo is home to more than 650 animal species. PhotographerLinda Nylind was given exclusive access to spend time with the keepers and find out more about their daily routinesLondon zoo was established in 1828 and is the world ’s oldest scientific zoo. Created as a collection for theZoological Society of London (ZSL), the animals from the Tower of London ’s menagerie were transferred there in 1832 and it opened to the public in 1847. Today it houses more than 20,000 animals and almost 700 species.ZSL is not funded by the state – it relies on memberships and fellowships, entrance fees and sponsorship to generate income.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Strong interaction between herbivores and plants

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Cologne) A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



'Better de-horned than dead' – zoo chops rhino horns to foil poachers

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 01:25:17 +0100

Czech zoo takes saw to the horns of its 21 rhinoceroses in response to deadly attack at Paris wildlife park this monthA Czech zoo has started to remove the horns from its 21 rhinos as a precaution after the recentkilling of a rhinoceros at a wildlife park in France by assailants who stole the animal ’s horn.With rhino horns considered a wonder cure in Asia – for everything from cancer, colds and fevers to high blood pressure, hangovers, impotence and other ailments – poachers have killed thousands of the animals in Africa and elsewhere.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Spiders eat 400-800 million tons of prey every year

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 04:00:00 +0100

(University of Basel) It has long been suspected that spiders are one of the most important groups of predators of insects. Zoologists at the University of Basel and Lund University in Sweden have now shown just how true this is -- spiders kill astronomical numbers of insects on a global scale. The scientific journal The Science of Nature has published the results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



16th century 'zoological goldmine' discovered – in pictures

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 12:38:33 +0100

It was one of those moments historians dream of. In 2012,Florike Egmond discovered an enthralling collection of 16th-century drawings and watercolours of animals collected by the founding father of zoologyConrad Gessner and his fellow Swiss successorFelix Platter hidden away in the Amsterdam University Library. These and many more illustrations feature in her new book on early modern natural history illustration,Eye For Detail (Reaktion Books, 2017)Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




CAS scientists review the basic and translational studies of hedgehog signaling

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 05:00:00 +0100

(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Previously, in recognition of their work on this topic, Prof. WANG Yu from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Professor Andrew P. McMahon from University of South California were invited by the journal Elife to comment on latest work from scientists at Stanford, Harvard, and Oxford on newly discovered mechanisms of chemical modulation of HH signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate

Thu, 02 Mar 2017 05:00:00 +0100

(Bentham Science Publishers) Investigations by researchers of Zoology Department of Cotton College, Guwahati, and Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam, India, have revealed that long term exposure to elevated doses of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) can significantly affect aldosterone concentration and serum sodium/ potassium levels in albino mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)



Zoos shouldn ’t be jails – let’s reimagine them and enjoy animals in the wild | Jules Howard

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 15:11:07 +0100

We shouldn ’t let animals die in entertainment venues. Urban zoos where we could view wildlife through VR would reinforce the conservation messageIt really is a damning report. Of more than 1,500 animals kept at Cumbria ’s South Lakes Safari zoo between December 2013 and September 2016,486 were found to have died. Emaciation, hypothermia, accidental electrocution, gastrointestinal infections, a decomposing squirrel monkey found behind a radiator, two dead snow leopards. At the same time, the zoo was hit with a £255,000 fine for health and safety breaches after one of its keepers was mauled by a Sumatran tiger.Related:Calls for Cumbrian zoo to be shut after 486 animals die in four yearsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Open wide: a fascinating look at teeth – in pictures

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 15:24:00 +0100

The Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates by Barry Berkovitz and Peter Shellis offers a unique look at the teeth of fish, reptiles and amphibians teeth, from the hardened skin rasps of the lamprey to the fangs of the rattlesnakeContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Welcome home, Lonesome George: giant tortoise returns to Galapagos

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 08:30:05 +0100

After almost five years with taxidermists in New York, Lonesome George has returned home. He may be dead, but his legacy is very much aliveLonesome George is back in Galapagos.Following thedeath of the celebrity tortoise in June 2012, his remains were sent to New York to be preserved by expert taxidermists. With the support of theGalapagos Conservancy, the last Pinta tortoise was the star of a highly successfulexhibition at theAmerican Museum of Natural History in 2014. Today, he flies back to the Galapagos Archipelago after almost five years on his whirlwind taxidermy tour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




New guidance on hand-rearing decisions for endangered penguin chicks

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:01:00 +0100

The first model of its kind which provides guidance on the survival likelihood of abandoned penguin chicks admitted to rehabilitation has been developed by researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, Cape Town, the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) and Bristol Zoological Society. (Source: University of Bristol news)



How we discovered the vampire bats that have learned to drink human blood

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 13:11:19 +0100

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)



Species new to science named after a 'Dungeons & Dragons' character

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 05:00:00 +0100

(Pensoft Publishers) Focused on terrestrial gastropods, commonly known as land snails, a team of biologists from the Natural History Museum of Stuttgart, Germany and the Zoology Museum of S ã o Paulo, Brazil, have been researching the Brazilian caves. In their latest paper, published in the journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, the scientists describe the fauna from several caves in central Brazil, including a new tiny species named after a character from the popular fantasy role-playing game Dungeons& Dragons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



Fossil of pregnant sea creature changes understanding of how reproductive system evolved

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 03:29:06 +0100

Fish-eating reptile Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245m years ago, gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggsAn extraordinary fossil unearthed in southwestern China shows a pregnant long-necked marine reptile that lived millions of years before the dinosaurs with its developing embryo, indicating the creature gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggs. Scientists on Tuesday said the fossil of the unusual fish-eating reptile called Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245m years ago during the Triassic Period, changes the understanding of the evolution of vertebrate reproductive systems.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Museum of Discovery to Expand Girls in STEM Program

Mon, 13 Feb 2017 13:38:17 +0100

The Museum of Discovery said last week that its Girls in STEM program will serve more girls in 2017 and expand to Jonesboro and Pine Bluff thanks to grants from Wal-Mart, Best Buy and the Women's Foundation of Arkansas.  Grants and private donations totaling more than $46,000 will allow the museum to grow the program this year to six weeks and serve an estimated 180 girls ages 11-14 for free. Girls in STEM gives participants a week-long opportunity to explore STEM careers as they engage in hands-on activities led by women STEM professionals, ultimately encouraging them to continue their STEM studies and even pursue STEM careers.  The Museum of Discovery has made the program a priority, as men in STEM careers far outnumber women, according to a 2016 study by the National Science F...

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




No wildlife charity campaigns to save parasites. But they should

Thu, 09 Feb 2017 09:00:18 +0100

We tend to think of parasites as harmful, itchy, nasty, creepy crawlies. But these strange, beautiful creatures have many uses – and they need our helpUntil very recently, the skies of North America played host to one of the largest birds on earth: the Californian condor (Gymnogyps californianus). Weighing in at 12 kg with a wingspan of three metres, these remarkable birds were almost lost to us until efforts were made in 1987 to round up the last remaining 27 individuals of the species for captive breeding efforts at San Diego Zoo.However, these birds were not alone. Nestled amongst their feathers was another species on the brink of extinction: the Californian condor louse (Colpocephalum californici). Regrettably, within weeks of entering San Diego Zoo for conservation efforts, a specie...



Starving Beached Beaked Whale Had 30 Plastic Bags Crammed In Its Belly

Sat, 04 Feb 2017 07:55:03 +0100

A rare goose-beaked whale that beached repeatedly on a Norwegian shore was so seriously ill that it had to be euthanized — and experts soon found out why. The two-ton animal had 30 plastic bags and other plastic garbage packed in its stomach. There was little room left for any food to nourish the beast. The whale’s stomach “was full of plastic,” zoologist Terje Lislevand of Bergen University told NRK TV on Friday. There was “no food, only some remnants of a squid’s head in addition to a thin fat layer,” he said.  Throughout the week the 20-foot-long adult male repeatedly swam into the shallow waters off the island of Sotra west of Bergen. Personnel from both the fire department and the Department of Wildlife Conservation continually attempted ...



Beached Whale Found With 30 Plastic Bags Crammed In Its Belly

Sat, 04 Feb 2017 07:55:03 +0100

A rare goose-beaked whale that repeatedly beached on a Norwegian shore was so ill that it had to be euthanized — and experts soon found out why. The 2-ton animal had about 30 plastic bags and other garbage packed in its stomach. There was “no food, only some remnants of a squid’s head in addition to a thin fat layer,” said University of Bergen zoologist Terje Lislevand, according to The Associated Press.  The 20-foot adult male whale had appeared several times in shallow waters off the island of Sotra, and personnel from both the fire department and the Department of Wildlife Conservation repeatedly attempted to herd or tow the animal back into the deep. The plastic — as well as candy wrappers, smaller bread bags and other garbage— was dis...



CAS scientists discover BCAS2 involved in alternative mRNA splicing in spermatogonia and the transit to meiosis

Fri, 27 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0100

(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Recently, a work led by Professor Li Lei in Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported that BCAS2 is involved in alternative mRNA splicing in mouse spermatogonia and the transition to meiosis. In fact, BCAS2 is a small protein conserved in organisms and may play important roles in several processes including pre-mRNA splicing and DNA damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)



[Book Review] Darwin's American ascendancy

Thu, 26 Jan 2017 22:41:05 +0100

Randall Fuller's lively new volume, The Book That Changed America, draws readers into the political and intellectual foment of antebellum America on the cusp of war. In just under 300 pages, he unfolds the story of how On the Origin of Species debuted in the United States on the eve of the Civil War and was read by a country torn apart by slavery and divided over whether the American union could (or should) survive the conflict. Moving deftly amid a diversity of familiar American figures, including novelists, poets, philosophers, zoologists, and botanists, Fuller captures their excitement, as well as their debates over Darwin's ideas Author: Myrna Perez Sheldon (Source: ScienceNOW)

MedWorm Message: Have you tried our new medical search engine? More powerful than before. Log on with your social media account. 100% free.




How Do Pheromones Really Work?

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 23:24:53 +0100

Pheromones are mysterious compounds that can make a mammal smell more sexy--but that's not true for humans. Zoologist Tristram Wyatt says human pheremones are hard to find.(Image credit: Maria Pavlova/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)