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Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law



2005 articles



Published: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

 



What Is Man, That The Judges Are Mindful Of Him?: Lessons From The PVS Cases

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
September 28, 2005 - "What is man, that thou are mindful of him?", asked the Psalmist. And the same question should be asked whenever judges ponder whether or not the life of a medically compromised patient should be ended.



Science, Technology, and Democracy: edited by Daniel Lee Kleinman

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
September 28, 2005 - What role can lay people play in democratizing science and technology? That question is explored in eight essays first presented at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Disentangling Daubert: An Epistemological Study in Theory and Practice

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
May 18, 2005 - In Frye (1923) the D.C. Court upheld the exclusion of testimony of the results of a then-new blood-pressure deception test on the grounds that novel scientific testimony "crosses the line between the experi­men­tal and the demonstrable...



Epistemic and Non-epistemic Aspects of the Factfinding Process in Law

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
May 18, 2005 - Legislators, regulators, and judges attempt to create factfinding processes that integrate both epistemic and non-epistemic goals. Moreover, the rule of law requires that those factfinding processes be principled, equitable, and reasonably transparent.



Two Concepts of Reliability

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
May 18, 2005 - In Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc.[2] and Kumho Tire Co. v. Carmichael,[3] the United States Supreme Court set the law of expert testimony on a quest for "reliability."



Daubert and the Acceptability of Legal Decisions

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
May 18, 2005 - In a series of cases beginning with Daubert v. Merrell-Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc. the U.S. Supreme Court gave federal judges a heightened duty to review scientific evidence and expert testimony that are proposed for admission into civil and criminal litigation.



Punishing Experts, or Protecting the Courts?

Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:59 EST

2005 articles
May 18, 2005 - We believe that there are several misstatements and factual reporting errors in the article Punishing Medical Experts for Unethical Testimony: A Step in the Right Direction or a Step too Far?, by David Resnik.