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AAAA Affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds



Updated: 2017-09-20T22:11:18-04:00

 



Cardinals score more runs than Reds and therefore win the game, 9-2

2017-09-20T22:11:18-04:00

Joe Nuxhall Honorary Memorial Star of the Game This was a rough one top to bottom for the Reds, so we might as well give today’s trophy to the only pitcher to appear in this one for Cincinnati and not allow a run. That would be Deck McGuire, who also happens to be the only pitcher on the Reds staff to not allow a run this season. He tossed two innings of shutout baseball with just one baserunner allowed via a hit by pitch. He’s only thrown 4.2 innings over three appearances for Cincinnati since his call-up, but he has yet to allow a run in that time. Considering his minor league numbers this season (2.79 ERA in 168 IP for Pensacola), the 28-year-old’s success isn’t a giant shock, but on a night where he was the only Reds pitcher not to get shelled in at least one inning, it’ll earn him the trophy. Honorable mentions go to Jesse Winker and Patrick Kivlehan, who drove in a run each, and Keury Mella, who made his big league debut on this final night of the summer season. Key Plays Matt Carpenter put a damper on Rookie Davis’ first start since May 8th from the get-go, working a full count before turning on a lead-off home run to right field. Cardinals led 1-0. Davis got a break in the second inning, but St. Louis jumped all over him in the fourth. Davis allowed two doubles in the first three hitters of the inning before back-to-back homers by Dexter Fowler and Paul Dejong made the score 5-0. Keury Mella came into the game in the fourth inning to make his major league debut, and retired the side in order on just 10 pitches. He stayed in for the fifth inning, which didn’t go quite as smoothly, as a walk and a double put two in scoring position with one out. That haunted Mella later when Yadier Molina doubled to right field to score both of those runs, and the Cardinals were on the way to cracking this one wide open, 7-0. The Reds didn’t make any noise at the plate themselves until the fifth inning. Jose Peraza got the frame started with a lead-off single, and scored one batter later on an RBI double by Patrick Kivlehan. Kivlehan then came around to score on an RBI single by Jesse Winker, and the score was 7-2. St. Louis didn’t let up against Luke Farrell in the sixth. A double and two walks loaded the bases for Tommy Pham, who burned the Reds yet again with an RBI single to make it an 8-2 game. The Cardinals added one more in the ninth, and that was that. Reds lose 9-2. Travis Graphner Other Notes Billy Hamilton was activated from the DL today, a day after publicly expressing discontent with the Reds not activating him yet. He’s relegated to pinch run duties (and did not play this evening), but I’d expect some at-bats to come over the weekend. The Reds will take a fourth crack at a season series victory over the Cardinals on Thursday, with Homer Bailey toeing the rubber opposite Carlos Martinez. First pitch is set for 7:10 p.m. EST. Tunes. [...]



Game 152: Reds vs. Cardinals (7:10 PM ET) Davis vs. Weaver

2017-09-20T19:00:02-04:00

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Today's Lineups

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS CINCINNATI REDS
Matt Carpenter - 1B Jesse Winker - RF
Tommy Pham - LF Zack Cozart - SS
Dexter Fowler - CF Joey Votto - 1B
Paul DeJong - SS Scooter Gennett - 2B
Yadier Molina - C Adam Duvall - LF
Kolten Wong - 2B Jose Peraza - CF
Jedd Gyorko - 3B Patrick Kivlehan - 3B
Stephen Piscotty - RF Tucker Barnhart - C
Luke Weaver - RHP Rookie Davis - RHP



Reds vs. Cardinals, Game 2: Preview and Predictions

2017-09-20T17:00:02-04:00

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Cincinnati Reds vs. St. Louis Cardinals

7:10 PM ET

Rookie Davis vs. Luke Weaver

Man, it sure seems like these Reds/Cards games have featured a lot of rookie pitchers, haven’t they? This time, we have that in more ways than one!

Rookie Davis makes his return to the rotation, following Stephens from last night. Davis made one bullpen appearance since rosters expanded, but hasn’t made a big league start since May. Davis had a 4.77 ERA in 11 starts in AAA.

Go Reds!




The Cincinnati Reds and Free Agency - A preview of the 2017-18 offseason

2017-09-20T10:00:11-04:00

Spoiler: They probably won't do anything. On October 1, the 2017 regular season will end.  A couple days after that, as per the norm, the postseason will commence.  By Halloween (or so) a team not from Cincinnati will be crowned as the new or repeating champions.  And roughly a week or so after that, any player with free agent status will be eligible to be wined, dined, and signed by one of the 30 MLB teams in a frenzy of activity that usually peaks in mid-December. This year, teams will have the luxury of competing for such players as Yu Darvish, JD Martinez, and Jake Arrieta. Here's a prediction for you: The Cincinnati Reds will not sign one of the premier free agents this offseason. That's not a prediction based on any particular knowledge of who is in the free agent class, how they might fit into the Reds' organizational makeup, or what the payroll budget might be for the Reds in 2018.  Rather, it's a simple extrapolation of a trend that has a lot of data behind it. I know I'm not breaking any new ground when I suggest that the Reds tend not to be super active in free agency.  But did you know just how inactive this team has been over the last 40 years? What I did was this: I looked up the top 15 free agents in every offseason since the beginning of the free agency era (the winter of 1976-77) and recorded some basic data about each one.  To determine who the top 15 free agents in any given season were, I used Baseball-reference as the book of record for which players were free agents in a given offseason and then I ranked those players by the total WAR they had recorded in the prior three seasons. There are some flaws with this method.  I'm guessing that Baseball-reference, as good as it is, is not a complete and exhaustive database on player transactions, especially in the early years of free agency.  It is also taken as a given that the past three seasons is not necessarily the best determinant of future value.  Take, for example, one of the top 15 free agents from last winter, Trevor Plouffe.  He compiled some halfway-decent WAR numbers by being an everyday third baseman with a solid glove and a bat capable of hitting the ball out of the yard with semi-regularity.  He also went to the DL three separate times in his 2016, meaning that teams weren't tripping over themselves to sign him for the 2017 campaign. Nevertheless, fifteen free agents per year for 41 offseasons, chosen by an objective methodology, gives us 615 data points to examine. Want to guess how many of those 615 signed with your favorite ball club? Before you come up with a number, try to think about what has happened in the last 41 years: The Reds were a bit of a mini-dynasty when free agency commenced. Nonetheless, over this 40+ year period of time, the Reds have been pretty much exactly average. From 1977-2016, the Reds were five games under .500, went to the postseason five times (and were screwed in 1981; Never Forget), and won it all once. 2017's results will dig the team a bit further under the .500 mark for the free agency era, but that'll still work out to averaging 80 or 81 wins per year. The free agency period has seen at least one (and perhaps two or three) episodes of league-wide collusion. There used to be a "free agency draft" which limited competition for free agents, in which franchises had to submit an entry for the right to offer a contract to a player. The amount of money in the game has exploded, via the emergence of cable TV, digital media, luxury suites, etc. Expansion has occurred a few times. There's been an increase in access to players around the world. The point of all that is that "the free agency era" is not really a single monolithic era at all, but perhaps more like 4 or 5 distinct eras, some of which looked absolutely nothing like where we are today.  Now then, with the reminder that the baseball world has changed drastically in the last forty years, how many o[...]



Reds fall to Cardinals 8-7 in extra innings

2017-09-19T22:39:58-04:00

Both Zack Cozart and Scooter Gennett did their homer thing again, though. The Joe Nuxhall Memorial Honorary Star of the Game Zack Cozart. It should almost always be Zack Cozart. The Cincinnati Reds shortstop blasted his 23rd homer of the season as part of a 2 for 5 night, one that featured a run scored and a pair of ribbies. He has Gold Gloved. He has Em Vee Peed. He, Zack Cozart, is Zack “MVP/GG” Cozart, and he’s played his ass off this entire season, even through pain. Congrats on yet another fine outing, Zack. I hope to write about your future exploits on whatever diamond you play on next year, too. Honorable Mentions are due to: Scooter Gennett, who doubled and dingered (again!); Joey Votto, who drove in a run, scored, and was on base another three times; Adam Duvall, who walked twice, scored, and drove in a run; and Ariel Hernandez, who fired 1.1 scoreless (walkless) innings in relief. Key Plays Winker hitting atop the Cincinnati lineup is a wonderful, wonderful revelation. The young lefty opened the Bottom of the 1st with an opposite-field double into left-center, and he moved up to 3B when Cozart’s comebacker ricocheted off Cardinals starter Jack Flaherty. That meant a runner was “in scoring position” for Votto, who responded with an RBI single up the middle against a pulled-in defense. Reds led, 1-0. The Reds cobbled together another run in the Bottom of the 2nd, and it began with an Adam Duvall walk. He motored over to 3B on Scott Schebler’s single, and then scored on a sac-fly by Patrick Kivlehan. Reds led, 2-0. The top of the order was up to similar diddlies in the Bottom of the 3rd. Winker led off with a single, and Cozart brought him around to score with a 2-run dong into the LF seats. Reds led, 4-0. Jackson Stephens made it into the Top of the 4th having allowed nary a baserunner, but St. Louis touched him up then. Back to back to back singles by Tommy Pham, Dexter Fowler, and Jose Martinez plated the first run, and Yadier Molina backed that up with a 3-run honker into the LF seats to level the score at 4-4. Things, though, were not yet done, as Paul DeJong followed Molina with a homer of his own, a mauled meatball to the batter’s eye in CF. Reds trailed, 5-4. Them Reddos, though, seemed hellbent on driving the final nail the the Cardinals’ playoff hopes. In the Bottom of the 6th, Votto began things with a walk, and he ended up on 3B when Scooter Gennett doubled behind him. Duvall then knocked a sac-fly into deep enough CF to score Votto and allow Scooty to move up to 3B, which proved large when Schebler’s subsequent fly ball into LF scored Scooter, too. Reds led, 6-5. Them Carddos, though, seem hellbent on keeping their minuscule chances of making the playoffs alive for as long as physically possible, as evidenced by Fowler’s solo homer off Kevin Shackelford in the Top of the 8th that leveled the score at 6-6. Tim Adleman hadn’t pitched in 12 days, yet when this game leaked into extra innings he suddenly was thrust onto the mound to pitch with the game on the line. Well, he hit Kolten Wong - the first batter he faced - before a later double by Fowler scored Wong. DeJong later singled, too, which scored Fowler to leave the Reds trailing 8-6. Scooter worked a 10 pitch at-bat against Juan Nicasio in the Bottom of the 9th before clubbing a solo dinger to make things interesting, but that’s where the scoring ended, unfortunately. Reds lost, 8-7. Tony Graphanino src="https://www.fangraphs.com/graphframe.aspx?config=0&static=0&type=livewins&num=0&h=450&w=450&date=2017-09-19&team=Reds&dh=0" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" height="450" width="450" style="border:1px solid black;">Source: FanGraphs Other Notes It’s official: 2017 has been the most dingerrific season in MLB history, with Alex Gordon’s blast for the Kansas City Royals going down as the 5,694th of the season. Of course, there are alot more teams and a lot more ga[...]



Game 151: Reds vs. Cardinals (7:10 PM ET) Stephens vs. Flaherty

2017-09-19T19:00:02-04:00

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Today's Lineups

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS CINCINNATI REDS
Kolten Wong - 2B Jesse Winker - RF
Tommy Pham - LF Zack Cozart - SS
Dexter Fowler - CF Joey Votto - 1B
Jose Martinez - 1B Scooter Gennett - 2B
Yadier Molina - C Adam Duvall - LF
Paul DeJong - SS Scott Schebler - CF
Jedd Gyorko - 3B Patrick Kivlehan - 3B
Stephen Piscotty - RF Stuart Turner - C
Jack Flaherty - RHP Jackson Stephens - RHP



Reds vs. Cardinals, Game 1: Preview and Predictions

2017-09-19T17:00:01-04:00

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Cincinnati Reds vs. St. Louis Cardinals

7:10 PM ET

Jackson Stephens vs. Jack Flaherty

After a successful weekend series and a well-earned off day, the Reds are back at it tonight to face the Cardinals.

Jackson Stephens will take his turn as the next man up as the Reds starters start running out of innings. Stephens was impressive in his only other start this season, a spot start against the Cubs in July where he struck out 8 and earned the win. He’s thrown 6 13 innings in long relief since rosters expanded, and has yet to give up a run.

He’ll face a fellow rookie in Jack Flaherty for the Cards.

Go Reds!




Changing baseball: A thought experiment

2017-09-19T10:43:12-04:00

Baseball has been pretty much the same for a long time. What this piece presupposes is: what if we change it? Here’s an idea to change baseball that baseball would never ever in a million years consider. This change doesn’t fix any purported problems with baseball. It probably wouldn’t change the average length of the game, which is something that some idiots out there think is a problem. It doesn’t address the shift or hitters trying to get more lift in their swings. It doesn’t help you make up rain outs. But what it does, I think, is change baseball in a relatively small way that would have some really interesting consequences that I’d like to play out here. Baseball will never do this, but I think it could be cool. A baseball game, properly considered, consists of nine innings with the innings halved into a top and a bottom. The teams play one half in the field and one half batting. At the end of nine innings, the team that has scored more runs is declared the winner. If there is a tie, they play full innings until there isn’t. It’s simple and orderly and makes for, in my opinion, the best sporting game on the planet. What would happen though if we changed it? What if instead of playing one game of nine innings, the teams played nine games of one inning? Imagine: the game begins in the top of the first inning with the visiting team batting and the home team pitching. When three outs are recorded, the teams switch. At the end of the first inning, the team that has scored more runs is declared the winner of the inning. If there is a tie, then the inning is declared a draw. The scores reset at the beginning of the second inning and so it continues until a team has won five innings. So instead of scoring like football or basketball, the game would be scored more like tennis. The lineup stays the same. You still have to bat all nine players before turning it over. Players can still only be substituted once over the duration of the game. All of those mechanics of the game would remain the same. The only difference would be how the scoring is organized. Take a look at the scoreboard again: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports In this example, the first three innings and the seventh would be draws, the Indians would win the fourth and the sixth, the Red Sox would win the fifth. Each inning would be scored individually, so in this example, the first three innings and the seventh would be draws, the Indians would win the fourth and the sixth, the Red Sox would win the fifth. And so, In the bottom of eighth inning as shown, the Indians would be leading two innings to one. Get it? What would happen? Game management would be completely different Managers would have quite a bit more to do, I think. If the inning is close or tied or a game-deciding inning, relievers and pinch-hitters would be leveraged quite a bit more. Managers would call on pinch-hitters far more often, as key high-leverage situations wouldn’t be exclusive to close games in the late innings. If in the third inning the team is down two innings to zero, a manager might feel more pressure to earn a win in the third inning so as to try to keep the game from running away. And so he might pinch-hit for his light-hitting shortstop with his best power-hitting bench player. In the third inning. Because each inning is now individually more important, you likely would see far fewer mop-up situations. There might be a big inning where a team scores five or six runs and so a mop-up guy is sent in to try to get the last few outs, but the game resets the very next inning, so you likely would no longer see the mop-up guy soaking up low-quality innings. Each new inning presents an opportunity to win. Lineup construction would also likely change a bit. As each new inning resets the premium of a run, you might see managers build their lineu[...]