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Updated: 2018-01-18T08:00:06-05:00

 



2018 Red Reporter Community Prospect Rankings: Shed Long Is #7!

2018-01-18T08:00:06-05:00

That’s Shed “Ding Dong” Long to you! Don’t call him Shedric, cause his name is Shed, Long picked up the 7th spot in our Community Prospect Rankings. We’re looking forward to a good year from ya, kid. Please, don’t disappoint. Another second baseman is being added to the list because why not? Antonio Santillan, RHP, 20 Highest 2017 Level: A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 9.6 career K/9. Most Worrisome Fact: 4.4 career BB/9. Alias(es): Santigold, Guns Up Tony. BB-Ref Page The Reds selected Santillan in the 2nd round of the 2015 draft out of Seguin, TX. While the right-hander has been known as a fireballer that will blow people away, he struggled with command during his first two minor league seasons. His first full season in MiLB showed why the Reds thought so highly of him back in 2015, as he put up his best season of his young career with Low-A Dayton. He improved his command and posted a career-best 3.9 BB/9 in 2017 while still striking out 9 per 9 innings. His best start in 2017 came back on May 8, where he dominated Cedar Rapids by striking out 10 over 6 innings while giving up only 1 run and no walks. He will be 21 for most of the 2018 season, so he has plenty of time to continue to work out his control issues. Hopefully he uses his strong 2017 to continue to improve in 2018. Santillan will most likely start the 2018 season in Daytona. Vladimir Guttierez, RHP, 22 Highest 2017 Level: Class A+ (Daytona) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 8.2 K/9, 1.7 BB/9, 4.95 K/BB ratio Most Worrisome Fact: 4.46 ERA in 103 innings pitched. Alias(es): Gooter, Little Vlad, Vlad The Impaler BB-Ref Page At the end of the 2016 season, the Reds signed the 6’0 190lb right handed pitcher out of Cuba for $4.75 million. He’s recently just pitched his first season in the Reds organization, and outside of some late season wearing down did nothing to show the signing wasn’t warranted. In fact, he’s one of the more exciting arms in the system. Guttierez is a pitcher who sits in the 92-95 MPH range, but can dial it up to 97 if he needs to. Scouts have stated his curveball is a plus pitch, but he needs to refine a third pitch to be successful in the majors. I’ve heard he’s a lot like Iglesias in that he will throw his curveball at multiple angles and speeds. That may lessen his need for a improved third pitch, but it wouldn’t hurt to add one. Vlad is also known for his wonderful control, which was on full display last year. Only Tyler Mahle has shown a better grasp at getting batters out while still striking them out and limiting walks. The one concern about Guttierez is whether or not he’ll be able to stick in the rotation. He has all the stuff, like Iglesias, but he also gets all the negative comparisons of Iglesias. Vlad is slight of size for what you’d normally consider a starting prospect, and he did tend to wear down near the end of the season. I’d like to chalk that up to him being younger, and it does appear the Reds are being much more cautious with the young man. They also have the time to do so. Coincidentally, Gutierrez’s ERA’s went down with each month last year, until his last start, but so did his strikeouts. Going from a 11.7 K/9 to a 5.2 K/9 average in July and August. Even with all the concerns, you can’t ignore his upside, which is why you find him as a choice at this point. Tyler Stephenson, C, 21 Highest 2017 Level: Low-A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 12.6% walk rate and .374 OBP in 2017. Most Worrisome Fact: Has not been able to stay healthy over the last 2 seasons, power has dropped since arriving in MiLB. Alias(es): Ty Steve, “Kennesaw”, “Bat Flippin’” BB-Ref Page Tyler Stephenson was drafted in the first round of the 2015 draft as the 11th overall pick. Profiling as a catcher who could hit for both average and power, he came into the Reds’ system with plenty of hype. He was even slated as the number 2 overall catching prospect heading into the 2016 season by mlb.com. The biggest issue facing Stephenson so far has been his ability to stay healthy. His 2016 seaso[...]



2018 Red Reporter Community Prospect Rankings: Jose Siri is your #6 prospect!

2018-01-17T10:08:17-05:00

The owner of the Midwest League’s longest hit streak cracks the top-10 for the first time. Jose Siri makes his debut in the Community Prospect Rankings at number 6. I guess tearing up the Midwest League and having all the right tools will do that for you. Siri’s departure from the ballot brings on a catching prospect who had his best minor league season derailed by an injury. Antonio Santillan, RHP, 20 Highest 2017 Level: A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 9.6 career K/9. Most Worrisome Fact: 4.4 career BB/9. Alias(es): Santigold, Guns Up Tony. BB-Ref Page The Reds selected Santillan in the 2nd round of the 2015 draft out of Seguin, TX. While the right-hander has been known as a fireballer that will blow people away, he struggled with command during his first two minor league seasons. His first full season in MiLB showed why the Reds thought so highly of him back in 2015, as he put up his best season of his young career with Low-A Dayton. He improved his command and posted a career-best 3.9 BB/9 in 2017 while still striking out 9 per 9 innings. His best start in 2017 came back on May 8, where he dominated Cedar Rapids by striking out 10 over 6 innings while giving up only 1 run and no walks. He will be 21 for most of the 2018 season, so he has plenty of time to continue to work out his control issues. Hopefully he uses his strong 2017 to continue to improve in 2018. Santillan will most likely start the 2018 season in Daytona. Shed Long, 2B, 22 Highest 2017 Level: AA (Pensacola) Eye-Poppingest Fact: .922 OPS in A+ Daytona with with 30 extra base hits in 279 plate appearances. 11.9% BB rate in AA with a drop in his K% Most Worrisome Fact: Defense is shaky according to scouts, and his numbers slid when promoted to AA with .227/.319/.362 line. Alias(es): Tool Shed, Shed To Bed, Shed Blockers, Shed Shocked BB-Ref Page Shed Long was drafted in the 12th round of the 2013 draft out of Jacksonville, Alabama as catcher. You’ll notice he doesn’t play catcher anymore (just like Joey Votto), the last time playing the position coming in rookie ball. Not much was known about the kid until he reached Class A Dayton at the age of 19, and he’s never really looked back. Shed is a guy that does a lot of things right. He won a wiffle ball HR derby at Reds Fest in 2016 one handed because he was recovering from surgery. That’s just really cool. He’s also one of those toolsy players the Reds are coveting that seem to know how to take a walk. His career line in the minors is .279/.353/.444. That’s plenty of power from a 2B, and he can run pretty well. However, the stolen base is not a huge part of his game. There are some iffy parts though. It’s been speculated that Shed might not be able to stick at 2B, and he did hit a slide on his first go around at AA. Much of that seems to be BABIP driven as it dropped from .368 to .271 once he was promoted. For the rest of his career he’s sported BABIPs in the mid .300s, but even if it reverted to league average his numbers would have looked much better. One glimpse of hope is that this was could be just a fluke. He showed more patience and struck out less once reaching AA. Look for Long to start the season once again in AA, but look for a mid-season promotion to Louisville. With Senzel, Blandino, Scooter, and Dilson Herrera all vying for crowded infield and outfield spots in the near future, having a guy like Shed Long is a good problem for the Reds. Vladimir Guttierez, RHP, 22 Highest 2017 Level: Class A+ (Daytona) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 8.2 K/9, 1.7 BB/9, 4.95 K/BB ratio Most Worrisome Fact: 4.46 ERA in 103 innings pitched. Alias(es): Gooter, Little Vlad, Vlad The Impaler BB-Ref Page At the end of the 2016 season, the Reds signed the 6’0 190lb right handed pitcher out of Cuba for $4.75 million. He’s recently just pitched his first season in the Reds organization, and outside of some late season wearing down did nothing to show the signing wasn’t warranted. In fact, he’s one of the more exciting arms in the system. Guttierez is a pi[...]



Cincinnati Reds rumors - Christian Yelich wants out of Miami

2018-01-16T20:32:49-05:00

The outfielder’s agent calls relationship with team “irretrievably broken.” The idea of Christian Yelich being traded by the Miami Marlins the offseason hasn’t been groundbreaking for quite some time. After the ownership group spearheaded by Derek Jeter took over the Marlins from Jeff Loria earlier this offseason, it was public knowledge that they new brass intended to shed salary in a major, major way - and immediately began doing so. However, as we sit here on January 16th of a still cold Hot Stove season, that Yelich is still a member of the Marlins is a bit of a surprise, one that Yelich personally would like to see solved. According to ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick, Yelich’s agent Joe Longo called his client’s relationship with the Marlins “irretrievably broken,” which makes it pretty obvious that the talent drain in South Florida has taken enough of a toll on Yelich to make him want out of that sinking ship. Gone are Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon already, with the super awesome amazeballs dinger structure apparently next on the chopping block. For any player, that’s a series of events that would serve to be disconcerting, but for an in-prime player like Yelich that’s an even bigger kick to the shins. Factor in that Yelich is in the midst of an incredibly team-friendly deal he signed alongside Stanton to form what was supposed to be the foundation of the future of the club, and you can certainly see why things aren’t super rosy in Miami. Despite being a wonderful fit, the Cincinnati Reds have yet to be connected to Yelich in any rumor whatsoever this offseason. Of course, the Cincinnati Reds have yet to be connected to anything at all this offseason. However, as the free agent market continues to crawl along as slowly as ever before, perhaps there’s an incredible advantage for the Reds to be slow-playing not just the free agent market, but the trade market, as well. So far this winter, the New York Yankees added to an already incredibly rich outfield mix featuring Aaron Judge, Brett Gardner, Aaron Hicks, and Jacoby Ellsbury when they landed Stanton. The San Francisco Giants were in need of offense in the worst possible way - specifically in the outfield - and have already used what little they possessed on the prospect front to land both Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria. Ozuna’s addition to St. Louis further crowded their OF situation, too, with Tommy Pham, Dexter Fowler, and Randal Grichuk all still around and in the mix. And the Pittsburgh Pirates, who conceivably could’ve moved into win-now mode in 2018 with McCutchen in his final year under contract, have begun a sell-off with his departure alongside that of starter Gerrit Cole. The Reds are now the front-runner for landing Yelich is a statement that I’m not at all making here. Heck, if Yelich is looking for a way out from a last-place bound squad with eyes on winning titles immediately, the Reds might be as far removed from his ideal landing spot as possible. However, while the Marlins are underwater thanks to self-inflicted concrete boots, the Reds have been nearing the surface for going on two years now, and (in theory) are on the cusp of coming up for air. Also, that’s a list of at least four teams that might’ve been in the mix for Yelich a few months ago that theoretically have found their answers in the outfield elsewhere. At 5 years and some $58.25 million, the remaining money on Yelich’s contract is a steal, something that carries more value to a club operating at payroll levels like Cincinnati than for those nearing the $197 million luxury tax. And, at just 26 years old, those years should theoretically represent some of the finest of his career. A cheap, controllable OBP machine capable of playing all three OF spots who could swap cavernous Marlins Park for GABP for 81 home games? That’s the exact kind of player the Reds should be drooling over under any circumstances, let alone in a scenario where that player is publicly asking for [...]



2018 Red Reporter Community Prospect Rankings: Tyler Mahle Is #5!

2018-01-16T08:00:06-05:00

The stuff, the control, and his chances to make the Opening Day roster push Tyler into the top five. Tyler Mahle takes home the gold as he rounds out the top five of the Reds farm system. Things will start to get a little stickier as we go forward. There are many deserving names to round out the next five in the group, but they are much closer together and all have some negatives that can be argued. Another pitcher has been added to the list. Antonio Santillan, RHP, 20 Highest 2017 Level: A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 9.6 career K/9. Most Worrisome Fact: 4.4 career BB/9. Alias(es): Santigold, Guns Up Tony. BB-Ref Page The Reds selected Santillan in the 2nd round of the 2015 draft out of Seguin, TX. While the right-hander has been known as a fireballer that will blow people away, he struggled with command during his first two minor league seasons. His first full season in MiLB showed why the Reds thought so highly of him back in 2015, as he put up his best season of his young career with Low-A Dayton. He improved his command and posted a career-best 3.9 BB/9 in 2017 while still striking out 9 per 9 innings. His best start in 2017 came back on May 8, where he dominated Cedar Rapids by striking out 10 over 6 innings while giving up only 1 run and no walks. He will be 21 for most of the 2018 season, so he has plenty of time to continue to work out his control issues. Hopefully he uses his strong 2017 to continue to improve in 2018. Santillan will most likely start the 2018 season in Daytona. Shed Long, 2B, 22 Highest 2017 Level: AA (Pensacola) Eye-Poppingest Fact: .922 OPS in A+ Daytona with with 30 extra base hits in 279 plate appearances. 11.9% BB rate in AA with a drop in his K% Most Worrisome Fact: Defense is shaky according to scouts, and his numbers slid when promoted to AA with .227/.319/.362 line. Alias(es): Tool Shed, Shed To Bed, Shed Blockers, Shed Shocked BB-Ref Page Shed Long was drafted in the 12th round of the 2013 draft out of Jacksonville, Alabama as catcher. You’ll notice he doesn’t play catcher anymore (just like Joey Votto), the last time playing the position coming in rookie ball. Not much was known about the kid until he reached Class A Dayton at the age of 19, and he’s never really looked back. Shed is a guy that does a lot of things right. He won a wiffle ball HR derby at Reds Fest in 2016 one handed because he was recovering from surgery. That’s just really cool. He’s also one of those toolsy players the Reds are coveting that seem to know how to take a walk. His career line in the minors is .279/.353/.444. That’s plenty of power from a 2B, and he can run pretty well. However, the stolen base is not a huge part of his game. There are some iffy parts though. It’s been speculated that Shed might not be able to stick at 2B, and he did hit a slide on his first go around at AA. Much of that seems to be BABIP driven as it dropped from .368 to .271 once he was promoted. For the rest of his career he’s sported BABIPs in the mid .300s, but even if it reverted to league average his numbers would have looked much better. One glimpse of hope is that this was could be just a fluke. He showed more patience and struck out less once reaching AA. Look for Long to start the season once again in AA, but look for a mid-season promotion to Louisville. With Senzel, Blandino, Scooter, and Dilson Herrera all vying for crowded infield and outfield spots in the near future, having a guy like Shed Long is a good problem for the Reds. Jose Siri, OF, 22 Highest 2017 Level: Low-A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: Professional career high .530 SLG and 24 HR in 2017 (previous: .483 SLG in Summer Dominican League in 2013, 10 HR at Billings in 2016); Midwest League record 39-game hitting streak. Most Worrisome Fact: 6% walk percentage isn’t going to get it done Alias(es): Apple, “Siri, get me a hit”, Jose “Ask” Siri, Jose “Rotis” Siri BB-Ref Page Jose Siri is raw, but damnit if he doesn’t [...]



FanGraphs releases their Top 26 prospects in the Cincinnati Reds system

2018-01-12T20:20:41-05:00

26? Well, getting to the big leagues is a marathon. First things first - ranking prospects is both incredibly difficult, and incredibly subjective. How do you value stable predictability? How much emphasis do you put on variability? Does proximity to the big leagues factor into your decisions? If a player is incredibly raw, yet incredibly toolsy, do you rank them as a better prospect than a prospect who is what he is with little additional upside? Hell, do you rank players as prospects if they’ve managed a cup of coffee at the big league level already? In the nebulous world of prospect ranking, the folks over at FanGraphs do their dang best to create a formula to evaluate things, throwing all sorts of statistics and scouting insight into a blender that spits out a future value smoothie for us all to peruse. All aspects are considered - ceiling, floor, age at each level, and so on - and their most recent analysis of the Cincinnati Reds’ system was published on Friday. Top 26 Prospects: Cincinnati Reds https://t.co/ZRRAGekS46— FanGraphs Baseball (@fangraphs) January 12, 2018 The Enquirer’s Zach Buchanan later corroborated Murray’s report. For Hamilton, that marks a number slightly lower than the $5 million MLB Trade Rumors’ model estimated he’d receive, though it’s still within range of that number to be certain. In his second season of arbitration eligibility, Hamilton is coming off another season where he flashed elite speed and defense while largely failing in most every other aspect of his game. Given that the arbitration process emphasizes many more traditional stats - read: dingers, ribbies, wins, and ERA, not UZR or DRS - it’s not exactly tailored to reward Billy’s greatest attributes. Steals, though, do work in his favor, and since he’s tallied 56-57-58-59 in each of the last four years, those numbers likely fuel much of the salary he’s making in 2018, his penultimate year under team control by the Reds. As the deadline neared, Murray also reported that Anthony DeSclafani and the Reds had avoided arbitration by reaching a 1-year, $860,000 contract, though that’s not been confirmed elsewhere just yet. Buchanan heard right at the 1 PM ET deadline that DeSclafani did, in fact, agree to a deal - as did Michael Lorenzen - with Murray conveying that Lorenzen will make just over $1.3 million in 2018. Both represent the biggest paydays of each player’s career, though given the injury issues both have dealt with in recent seasons it’s not terribly surprising to see those salaries come in below estimates, as well. Perhaps the biggest story of the day covers both Suarez and Gennett, as the Reds failed to reach agreements with either of those two. Given that the four players who the Reds agreed to terms with all came in at numbers below most models and that the two players who didn’t agree were coming off monster seasons, it’s easy to suspect that there were much larger gaps in the two sides’ negotiations regarding Suarez and Gennett. Suarez, in particular, likely has the most invested in this particular season’s salary, since he’s just now entering his first year of arb-eligibility; given that the salaries through the arbitration process build on previous years, the higher the number he can establish in year 1 sets a platform for larger earning power down the road. The news of the day certainly provides a bit more clarity for the final payroll for 2018, though Gennett and Suarez stuck in limbo for the time being with large expected salary obligations that’s far from set in stone. There’s also the slight, slight chance that the Reds actually go out and sign more players, but I’ll let you set the odds on those moves making big impacts to the 2018 bottom line yourselves. [...]



2018 Red Reporter Community Prospect Rankings: Jesse Winker slots in at #4

2018-01-12T08:15:02-05:00

A mainstay in this feature, the rook will look to finally nab an everyday spot in the big leagues. Jesse Winker has been featured heavily in this yearly ranking for several years now. This will be his final time on this list, and you, our beautiful stable geniuses of readers, have ranked him number four on our list of prospects. You guys are, like, really smart. Tyler Mahle, RHP, 23 Highest 2017 Level: MLB (Cincinnati Reds) Eye-Poppingest Fact: Mahle needed just 89 pitches to sit the Mobile Bay Bears in order last year while with AA Pensacola. All of them. The Perfect Game was actually Mahle’s second career no-hitter, as he logged one in 2016 with Daytona. Most Worrisome Fact: His fastball isn’t exactly blazing, as it averaged just 92.9 mph in his stint with the Reds last year; a career 8.3 K/9 through his 5-year MiLB career is solid, yet not overwhelming. Alias(es): Poppin’, Flogging, Mahle-able, Tinker Taylor Tyler Mahle BB-Ref Page Mahle is a classic example of a pitcher who doesn’t just throw, he pitches, and it’s that master-of-craft ability that has seen him crack many Top 100 overall prospect lists as he’s risen through the minors. A 2.85 career ERA in 558.0 MiLB innings is impressive in itself, but a minuscule WHIP of 1.10 and rock solid 4.48 K/BB in that time stand out as much, if not moreso. While he’s got the ability to run a fastball up to 96-97 mph at times, that’s not at all what he uses to get batters out. Rather, he pounds the strike zone relentlessly, and his 1.9 career BB/9 in those MiLB innings exemplifies it. The former 7th round pick cracked the big leagues for the first time in 2017, yet holds still holds his rookie status. And while his initial outings with the Reds didn’t flash the same kind of peripherals we’ve seen from him in the minors, he once again managed to keep runs off the board - something the litany of young pitching peers of his failed at across miserably, by comparison. Considering he got just 59.1 innings of time at AAA Louisville before his late-season call up by Cincinnati, there’s a chance he opens the year with the Bats in 2018. However, if he shows in Spring Training the kind of arsenal and effectiveness he’s flashed throughout his career, a spot in the Opening Day rotation is by no means out of the question. Antonio Santillan, RHP, 20 Highest 2017 Level: A (Dayton Dragons) Eye-Poppingest Fact: 9.6 career K/9. Most Worrisome Fact: 4.4 career BB/9. Alias(es): Santigold, Guns Up Tony. BB-Ref Page The Reds selected Santillan in the 2nd round of the 2015 draft out of Seguin, TX. While the right-hander has been known as a fireballer that will blow people away, he struggled with command during his first two minor league seasons. His first full season in MiLB showed why the Reds thought so highly of him back in 2015, as he put up his best season of his young career with Low-A Dayton. He improved his command and posted a career-best 3.9 BB/9 in 2017 while still striking out 9 per 9 innings. His best start in 2017 came back on May 8, where he dominated Cedar Rapids by striking out 10 over 6 innings while giving up only 1 run and no walks. He will be 21 for most of the 2018 season, so he has plenty of time to continue to work out his control issues. Hopefully he uses his strong 2017 to continue to improve in 2018. Santillan will most likely start the 2018 season in Daytona. Shed Long, 2B, 22 Highest 2017 Level: AA (Pensacola) Eye-Poppingest Fact: .922 OPS in A+ Daytona with with 30 extra base hits in 279 plate appearances. 11.9% BB rate in AA with a drop in his K% Most Worrisome Fact: Defense is shaky according to scouts, and his numbers slid when promoted to AA with .227/.319/.362 line. Alias(es): Tool Shed, Shed To Bed, Shed Blockers, Shed Shocked BB-Ref Page Shed Long was drafted in the 12th round of the 2013 draft out of Jacksonville, Alabama as catcher. You’ll notice he doesn’t play catcher anymore (jus[...]



2018 Red Reporter Community Prospect Rankings: Taylor Trammell Is #3!

2018-01-11T08:00:07-05:00

The toolsy outfielder from Georgia is solidifying his name in the minds for Reds fans. In a much closer vote than the previous two, Taylor Trammell walked away with the #3 spot in our 2018 Community Prospect Rankings. The first three went pretty much the way I expected it, and the way most lists have panned out so far. Going forward, it looks to get quite a bit more difficult, and this where the discussions tend to heat up. A new player has been added to keep the choices you have at four. Tyler Mahle, RHP, 23 Highest 2017 Level: MLB (Cincinnati Reds) Eye-Poppingest Fact: Mahle needed just 89 pitches to sit the Mobile Bay Bears in order last year while with AA Pensacola. All of them. The Perfect Game was actually Mahle’s second career no-hitter, as he logged one in 2016 with Daytona. Most Worrisome Fact: His fastball isn’t exactly blazing, as it averaged just 92.9 mph in his stint with the Reds last year; a career 8.3 K/9 through his 5-year MiLB career is solid, yet not overwhelming. Alias(es): Poppin’, Flogging, Mahle-able, Tinker Taylor Tyler Mahle BB-Ref Page Mahle is a classic example of a pitcher who doesn’t just throw, he pitches, and it’s that master-of-craft ability that has seen him crack many Top 100 overall prospect lists as he’s risen through the minors. A 2.85 career ERA in 558.0 MiLB innings is impressive in itself, but a minuscule WHIP of 1.10 and rock solid 4.48 K/BB in that time stand out as much, if not moreso. While he’s got the ability to run a fastball up to 96-97 mph at times, that’s not at all what he uses to get batters out. Rather, he pounds the strike zone relentlessly, and his 1.9 career BB/9 in those MiLB innings exemplifies it. The former 7th round pick cracked the big leagues for the first time in 2017, yet holds still holds his rookie status. And while his initial outings with the Reds didn’t flash the same kind of peripherals we’ve seen from him in the minors, he once again managed to keep runs off the board - something the litany of young pitching peers of his failed at across miserably, by comparison. Considering he got just 59.1 innings of time at AAA Louisville before his late-season call up by Cincinnati, there’s a chance he opens the year with the Bats in 2018. However, if he shows in Spring Training the kind of arsenal and effectiveness he’s flashed throughout his career, a spot in the Opening Day rotation is by no means out of the question. Jesse Winker, OF, 24 Highest 2017 Level: MLB (Cincinnati Reds) Eye-Poppingest Fact: A .904 OPS and 133 OPS+ in 47 games with the Reds, featuring his patented on-base ability (.375) and the return of his power stroke. Most Worrisome Fact: His defense is average, at best. Also, his power nearly evaporated completely at the upper levels of the minors, though the hope is that multiple wrist injuries were the culprit - and are now fully healed. Alias(es): Stinky Winky, Uncle Jesse, Winker Taylor Soldier Spy BB-Ref Page If it seems like Jesse Winker has been at or near the top of this list for a generation, you aren’t wrong. Since being a supplemental 1st round pick out of high school in 2012, Winker has long been well regarded in prospect circles thanks to his gifted offensive game. Heck, MLB Pipeline’s Jonathan Mayo once picked Winker to lead all of Minor League Baseball in hitting back in 2015, and we all nodded that it was completely possible. Winker peaked as the #26 overall prospect in the game by MLB Pipeline prior to that 2015 season, and was a universal Top 100 prospect by them, Baseball Prospectus, and Baseball America for several years running, but when his power disappeared, so too did his prospect status despite him still possessing several other, valuable traits. If the car crash and multiple wrist injuries he’s fought through over the last few years were both the reason for his power evaporating and are now fully healed, though,[...]