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A SBNation Community about Minor League Baseball, Rookies, and Prospects



Updated: 2018-02-19T16:03:35-05:00

 



Milwaukee Brewers preliminary prospect grade breakdown

2018-02-19T16:03:35-05:00

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Assessing the Brewers system, early edition

Work continues on the Milwaukee Brewers Top 20 prospects for 2018 report. My first pass through the players yielded the following results:

Grade A: Zero
Grade A-: Zero
Grade B+: Three
Grade B: Two
Grade B-: Six
Grade C+: 25
Grade C: Everyone else

There is one guy on the B+/A- boundary, two or three B- guys who might end up a notch higher, and a few C+ who might end up at B-. The names:

Phil Bickford, RHP
Zack Brown, RHP
Corbin Burnes, RHP
Jean Carmona, INF
Yeison Coca, SS
Clint Coulter, OF
Bubba Derby, RHP
Marcos Diplan, RHP
Mauricio Dubon, INF
Lucas Erceg, 3B
Larry Ernesto, OF
Mario Feliciano, C
Gabriel Garcia,1B
Jake Gatewood, 1B
Trent Grisham, OF (formerly Trent Clark)
Devin Hairston, SS
KJ Harrison, C
Payton Henry, C
Carlos Herrera, RHP
Keston Hiura, 2B
Adrian Houser, RHP
Cooper Hummel, C
Thomas Jankins, RHP
Gilbert Lara, SS (because people will ask, he’s a C at best)
Max Lazar, RHP
Caden Lemons, RHP
Jorge Lopez, RHP
Jesus Lujano, OF
Tristen Lutz, OF
Ernesto Martinez, Jr, 1B
Chad McClanahan, 1B
Kodi Medeiros, LHP
Karlos Morales, LHP
Brendan Murphy, LHP
Jake Nottingham, C-1B
Nate Orf, 2B
Demi Orimoloye, OF
Luis Ortiz, RHP
Josh Pennington, RHP
Freddy Peralta, RHP
Jon Perrin, RHP
Brett Phillips, OF
Antonio Pinero, SS
Cody Ponce, RHP
Corey Ray, OF
Carlos Rodriguez, OF
Wuilder Rodriguez, RHP
Troy Stokes, Jr, OF
Trey Supak, RHP
Quintin Torres-Costa LHP
Michele Vassalotti, RHP
Je’Von Ward, OF
Braden Webb, RHP
Tyler Webb, LHP
Devin Williams, RHP
Taylor Williams, RHP
Brandon Woodruff, RHP
Kyle Wren, OF




Milwaukee Brewers preliminary prospect list

2018-02-19T10:01:01-05:00

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The working research list for Milwaukee Brewers prospects. . .

I am working on the Milwaukee Brewers Top 20 Prospects for 2018 report. My first run through the system produced 55 names worthy of research and study, listed below.

If you feel someone important is missing, feel free to suggest him in the comments.

Phil Bickford, RHP
Zack Brown, RHP
Corbin Burnes, RHP
Jean Carmona, INF
Yeison Coca, SS
Clint Coulter, OF
Bubba Derby, RHP
Marcos Diplan, RHP
Mauricio Dubon, INF
Lucas Erceg, 3B
Larry Ernesto, OF
Mario Feliciano, C
Gabriel Garcia,1B
Jake Gatewood, 1B
Trent Grisham, OF (formerly Trent Clark, he changed his name)
Devin Hairston, SS
KJ Harrison, C
Payton Henry, C
Carlos Herrera, RHP
Keston Hiura, 2B
Adrian Houser, RHP
Cooper Hummel, C
Thomas Jankins, RHP
Max Lazar, RHP
Caden Lemons, RHP
Jorge Lopez, RHP
Jesus Lujano, OF
Tristen Lutz, OF
Ernesto Martinez, Jr, 1B
Kodi Medeiros, LHP
Karlos Morales, LHP
Brendan Murphy, LHP
Jake Nottingham, C-1B
Nate Orf, 2B
Demi Orimoloye, OF
Luis Ortiz, RHP
Josh Pennington, RHP
Freddy Peralta, RHP
Jon Perrin, RHP
Brett Phillips, OF
Antonio Pinero, SS
Cody Ponce, RHP
Corey Ray, OF
Carlos Rodriguez, OF
Wuilder Rodriguez, RHP
Troy Stokes, Jr, OF
Trey Supak, RHP
Quintin Torres-Costa LHP
Michele Vassalotti, RHP
Je’Von Ward, OF
Braden Webb, RHP
Tyler Webb, LHP
Devin Williams, RHP
Taylor Williams, RHP
Brandon Woodruff, RHP
Kyle Wren, OF




MLB Draft prospects: A first look at Georgia Tech’s Joey Bart

2018-02-19T09:31:57-05:00

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Joey Bart is the best catching prospect in the 2018 MLB Draft. After watching him once, it’s clear to see why.

Georgia Tech’s catching star Joey Bart has been on the radar since he stepped foot into Russ Chandler Stadium. Watching him just once, it’s plain to see why.

Bart is a hulking presence, listed at 6-foot-3 and 225 pounds. That’s pretty much the same frame that Zack Collins was listed at, which some felt may give him trouble behind the plate as he advanced. It doesn’t seem to be an issue for Bart at all.

The junior catcher made play after play behind the plate. He was able to block several balls, and never looked like he was straining or working to do so. He also threw out two runners on the day, both with laser-like precision. Bart definitely has a canon, the ball traveled quickly to the second base, and it was a strike both times. He nearly tried a first base pickoff attempt, but wound up holding back. I’ll be interested to see how quickly he can get it down the line.

One of the lives lost was Athletic Director Chris Hixon, who was a special influence in Luzardo’s life on and off the baseball diamond during his time as an Eagle.

The donation page is dedicated in the name of Hixon’s family, his wife Debbie and his sons Cory and Tommy.

We can’t get the victims back, but we can honor their memory and legacy. Luzardo wants to do it, we can help.

Another active MLB player, Anthony Rizzo, also attended Stoneman Douglas and returned home after the tragedy to deliver a tearful vigil.

The story is obviously hard to swallow, much less comprehend. And I won’t try to do it here. But the least I can do is donate and pass the message along.

To donate, visit Jesus Luzardo’s YouCaring page here. #DouglasStrong




3 White Sox prospects to know

2018-02-18T12:03:02-05:00

The White Sox farm system has a much different look than it did just two years ago. Heavy on top, there’s some nice depth lurking on the farm. Thanks primarily to the Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees, the Chicago White Sox were able to accelerate their farm system rebuild. In the process of a fire sale, the White Sox snagged a couple of top prospects, making their top-3 as elite as anyone’s in the game. But wait, there’s more. The White Sox have had some nice drafts picks and international signings of late. That gives them some depth, and names to watch. Micker Adolfo, OF If you like power, Adolfo is your man. That is evidenced by this video of a home run he hit that hasn’t landed yet. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FI41uOUgq8k?rel=0&" style="border: 0; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;" allowfullscreen="" scrolling="no"> Adolfo has the plus tools to be a big leaguer. He’d arguably be the best raw power bat in the system if it weren’t for Eloy Jimenez. Adolfo also has a cannon of an arm, likely tops in the system. He struggles mightily in pitch recognition and strikeouts. It’s easy to look at the stat line and say that the 21-year-old improved greatly in 2017. You wouldn’t be wrong for saying that either. It does come with some caution, however, as it was his second time through the South Atlantic League. And while his slash line and power numbers improved, the strikeout and plate awareness issues remained. How will that translate at the next level against more advanced pitching? That’s the question, but with the ability to hit bombs like that, it’s worth watching to find out. Spencer Adams, RHP With names like Alec Hansen, Dane Dunning and even Dylan Cease in the mix, Adams sometimes gets lost in the shuffle. Especially with the average stuff he has. Adams is a curious case. Our own John Sickels reports that his fastball sits at 90, topping out at 95, which was lower than what Baseball America had him marked at on draft day. It has lots of life, and plenty of sink, and is without a doubt his best pitch. He also has what John labels a “good slider, decent change up”. He showed improvements last season in his attack, and still just 21 years of age, that is promising. As is his willingness to attack the zone. Adams will never lead the league in strikeouts (just 113 in 152 innings), but he doesn’t allow too many free passes either (40 in 2017). It’s certainly worth noting that he has been very hittable over his career (a .277 batting average against) and allowed a staggering 19 home runs last season alone. There’s plenty to like in Adams. This will be a big season in his development. The catching question? The White Sox have an interesting bunch behind the plate, and it’s worth watching who will emerge as the best of the bunch. Zack Collins was my favorite power bat in the 2016 MLB Draft (remember the bomb he launched in the College World Series after getting drafted). He has an advanced plate awareness, but hasn’t hit for average just yet. He can throw runners out, but has some work to do in his blocking and receiving skills. Seby Zavala had a monster 2017 at at the plate. He hit 21 home runs and 21 doubles split between Low and High A. Now 24 with question marks on his defense, 2018 will be a big year in figuring out what he has to offer. Evan Skoug turned a big 2017 at TCU (.272, 20 home runs) into a seventh-round selection in last year’s draft. He struggled in his Low-A debut offensively and defensively, but seems to have the pedigree to hold out hope. Yermin Mercedes is one I didn’t know much about. Acquired via the Rule 5 minor league draft from the Orioles, John has him as one of his sleepers for 2018. Here’s why: Age 24, originally signed by Baltimore Orioles out of Dominican Republic in 2010, acquired by White Sox in minor league portion of 2017 Rule 5 draft, meaning they can keep him and don’t have to send him back; seems [...]



Quick thoughts on the Jake Odorizzi trade

2018-02-18T10:34:28-05:00

The Rays continue the fire sale, but was the return worth it? The Minnesota Twins and Tampa Bay Rays struck a deal on Saturday for right-hander Jake Odorizzi. The Rays return was Jermaine Palacios. If you asked yourself, ‘who?’, don’t worry, you’re not alone. The deal with the Twins was the second of two curious moves by the Rays on Saturday. The first move brought C.J. Cron across country for the ol’ player to be named later. The corresponding move was to dump 2017 All Star Corey Dickerson. One can imagine why the social media masses screamed tank job last night. The Rays system is one of the deeper ones in the game, with several top prospects ready to perform at the big league level. But what teams like the New York Yankees have shown is that a team with marginal talent, which the Rays have more than, can continue to compete without turning to a Chicago Cub/ Houston Astro-ian tear down. Apparently the Rays feel otherwise. So, who’d they get in Palacios? How’d the Twins get him? Signed out of Venezuela for $700,000 in 2013. Position: Shortstop Height/ Weight: 6-foot/ 145 pounds Bats/ Throws: Right/ Right 2017 numbers (split between the Midwest and Florida State Leagues): .296/.333/.454; 21 doubles, 10 triples, 13 home runs; 20-for-35 in stolen bases Looking at the stat line, Palacios had a fantastic 2017. His home run total alone was 10 more than any other season of his career, impressive for his size. It appears the righty tapped into his pull-side power, judging from his spray chart. MLBFarm.com But a deeper look sees many a question mark. Is he quick? Yes, but a career 57 percent success rate shows he needs to improve his instincts on the bases. Getting by on pure speed alone won’t last as he moves up the ladder. He certainly struggles with pitch recognition, mainly breaking stuff. While he doesn’t strikeout a ton (18 percent across both levels) he hardly draws a walk (just four percent of plate appearances). src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ulG5J6u6S44?rel=0&" style="border: 0; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;" allowfullscreen="" scrolling="no"> src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oKEmu6jUMoM?rel=0&" style="border: 0; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;" allowfullscreen="" scrolling="no"> (He certainly doesn’t have much of a pre-pitch stance, but takes a big lunge at the ball and the swing seems quick enough to suggest he’ll continue to power up on balls if he makes contact. The way he gets fooled for strike three speaks volumes.) Palacios put up the majority of his numbers in the Midwest League before his promotion to the FSL. It was his second time through the league, which certainly raises some questions. His numbers dropped rather noticeably once in the pitcher-happy FSL. Not knowing much about his defense, most others seem to feel he is a fringe player at short at best. It seems like he has decent enough range, but an average arm leaves him more as a career utility player than a starting big leaguer. Odorizzi has not matched his big 2015 in the two years since, watching his FIP (amongst other numbers) climb each season. That said, he is signed through the 2018 season, arbitration eligible in 2019, and hits the market in 2020. That may be the same year Palacios is ready for the big leagues (stress on “may be”). With the Twins now one of the deeper systems in the game, it seems even in a salary dump/rebuild move, they could have snagged a prospect with a little more certainty in his future. [...]



Top 20 Prospects lists for 2018: Index by organization

2018-02-17T19:30:58-05:00

Here’s a central index for Minor League Ball’s 2018 Top 20 prospects lists for each farm system. Here is an index for all the Minor League Ball Top 20 Prospects lists for all 30 MLB organizations for 2018. This will be updated each time a new team is added. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST Baltimore Orioles (published January 26, 2018)Boston Red Sox (published January 11, 2018)New York Yankees (published December 8th, 2017, updated 12/18/17)Tampa Bay RaysToronto Blue Jays AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL Chicago White Sox (published February 11, 2018)Cleveland Indians (published January 4, 2018)Detroit TigersKansas City Royals (published November 9, 2017, updated 12/18/17)Minnesota Twins (published October 24, 2017, updated 12/18/17) AMERICAN LEAGUE WEST Houston Astros (published November 27, 2017, updated 1/31/18)Los Angeles Angels (published February 2, 2018)Oakland Athletics (published December 20, 2017)Seattle Mariners (published January 22, 2018)Texas Rangers (published February 17, 2018) NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST Atlanta Braves (published November 3rd, 2017, updated 12/18/17)Miami Marlins (published January 24, 2018, updated 1/26/2018)New York Mets (published February 14, 2018)Philadelphia PhilliesWashington Nationals (published December 24th, 2017) NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL Chicago Cubs (published December 2, 2017, updated 12/18/17)Cincinnati Reds (published January 18, 2018)Milwaukee BrewersPittsburgh Pirates (published January 30, 2018)St. Louis Cardinals NATIONAL LEAGUE WEST Arizona Diamondbacks (published December 15, 2017)Colorado Rockies (published February 7, 2018)Los Angeles Dodgers (published November 16, 2017)San Diego Padres (published January 9, 2017)San Francisco Giants [...]