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A SBNation Community about Minor League Baseball, Rookies, and Prospects



Updated: 2016-12-08T17:04:01-05:00

 



2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft: Minor League phase, rounds two and three

2016-12-08T17:04:01-05:00

2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft: Minor League Phase, Rounds Two and Three Here are the results of the minor league phase of the 2016 MLB Rule 5 draft. Unlike the major league phase, these players do not have to be offered back to their original team. Most will never reach the majors, but occasionally someone can pop up as a useful player. It is a very cheap, no-risk way to add some depth to your farm system. Round Two Rays: Jairo Munoz, RHP, Phillies: Age 25, from Dominican Republic, originally in Royals system then signed by Phillies as free agent; threw just eight innings in High-A this year and has long track record of injuries though usually effective when on the mound, 3.26 ERA in 108 career innings, none above High-A; fastball can hit 95. Diamondbacks: Grant Sides, RHP, Indians: Age 27, 12th round pick in 2011 out of Samford; 3.36 ERA in 62 innings in Double-A with 69/27 K/BB, just 41 hits; fastball as high as 97 and a good curve but control record erratic; could be quite useful with a bit more command. Brewers: Matt Ramsey, RHP, Marlins: Age 27, 19th round pick in 2011 from University of Tennessee, missed all of 2015 and most of 2016 with injury but has excellent performance record when healthy, 2.06 ERA in 148 career innings with 176/66 K/BB; another hard-thrower when healthy, worth tracking. Angels: Adrian Almeida, LHP, Mets: Age 21, from Venezuela, posted 6.14 ERA in 22 innings in Appalachian League with 29/13 K/BB; flashes plus curveball and 90 MPH fastball but struggles with command, young enough to improve a great deal. Marlins: Nick Maronde, LHP, Indians: Age 27, third round pick by Angels in 2011 from University of Florida, hot prospect at one time but lost his command when arriving in majors, posted 7.13 ERA in 18 innings with 19/18 K/BB with Angels 2012-2014; wandering high minors last two seasons, still flashes old ability including 23/3 K/BB and 2.19 ERA in 25 innings in Double-A in ’16; worth a flier. Astros: Jared Mortensen, RHP, Rays: Age 28, signed as free agent in 2013; Canadian; posted 5.23 ERA with 86/57 K/BB in 72 innings, 53 hits in Double-A; strong strikeout and hit rates but held back by control problems Yankees: Colten Brewer, RHP, Pirates: Age 24, fourth round pick in 2011 from high school in Texas, posted 4.09 ERA with 66/27 K/BB in 70 innings in High-A; has been clocked as high as 96 but secondary pitches and command within strike zone remain inconsistent; has been a starter primarily but may be better-suited for bullpen; intriguing rehab project. Mariners: Chuck Taylor, OF, Diamondbacks: Age 23, fourth round pick in 2012 from high school in Texas; hit .261/.354/.391 in 238 at-bats between High-A and Double-A; left-handed batter who draws walks but has never shown enough on-field power or speed to push forward as a prospect. Tigers: Elvis Rubio, OF, Brewers: Age 22, from Dominican Republic, hit .223/.270/.298 with 107 strikeouts, seven homers in 457 at-bats in Low-A/High-A; strong build at 6-3, 215 but has never produced as expected with serious contact issues. Orioles: Brian Moran, LHP, Braves: Age 28, seventh round pick by Mariners in 2009 from University of North Carolina; Colin Moran’s brother; soft-tossing lefty with career 3.11 ERA, 369/96 K/BB in 327 innings; missed most of 2016 with injury but an effective Triple-A reliever in past seasons. Dodgers: Kyle Grana, RHP, Cardinals: Age 25, signed as undrafted free agent in 2013; posted 3.12 ERA with 63/27 K/BB in 52 innings in High-A with just 39 hits; old for the level but has always pitched well, fastball up to 95 and a good curve, but 6-4, 250 pound build stands out; could be very useful if he throws strikes. Red Sox: Josh Smith, LHP, Pirates: Age 27, 25th round pick in 2012 out of Wichita State; 6.44 ERA in 57 innings in Double-A with 61/30 K/BB; controls lefties (.130 last year) but right-handers mash him (.370). Rangers: Zach Bird, RHP, Braves: Age 22, ninth round pick by Dodgers in 2012, traded to Braves in big Alex Wood/Bronson Arroyo/Hector Olivera trade in 2015; was considered a strong prospect u[...]



2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft: Minor League Phase, round one reports

2016-12-08T16:03:40-05:00

2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft: Minor League Phase, Round One Here are the results of the minor league phase of the 2016 MLB Rule 5 draft. Unlike the major league phase, these players do not have to be offered back to their original team. Most will never reach the majors, but occasionally someone can pop up as a useful player. It is a very cheap, no-risk way to add some depth to your farm system. This is round one. Round Two will follow in a separate article. Round One Reds: Jose Adames, RHP, Marlins: From Dominican Republic, age 23, posted 6.00 ERA with 43/27 K/BB in 48 innings in High-A; live arm but spotty track record, had more success in previous seasons. Padres: Trevor Frank, RHP, Indians: Age 25, eighth round pick in 2013 from UC Riverside, saved 17 with 43/10 K/BB, 2.47 ERA in 44 innings in High-A; old for the level but has strong performance record and middle relief possibilities. Rays: Ty Hensley, RHP, Yankees: Age 23, first round pick in 2012, hasn’t pitched since 2014 due to a variety of injuries including two Tommy John surgeries as well as injuries suffered in an off-field assault in 2015, was a very solid prospect at one time. Braves: Cesilio Pimentel, LHP, Pirates: Age 23, from Dominican Republic, posted 2.65 ERA with 48/15 K/BB in 51 innings in Low-A; old for the level but an efficient strike-thrower with a good performance record at the lower levels. Diamondbacks: Jon Fitzsimmons, RHP, Indians: Age 25, Canadian right-hander who pitched college ball at Canisius, pitched well in independent Can-Am League and was signed by Indians as free agent over the summer, fastball up to 94 and fanned 25 in 16 innings in Low-A. Phillies: Jorge Flores, SS, Blue Jays: Age 25, from Mexico, hit .187/.260/.242 in 252 at-bats in Double-A; versatile glove with experience at all positions except catcher and first base; won’t hit much. Brewers: Art Charles, 1B, Reds: Age 26, huge 6-6, 220 left-handed hitter drafted by Blue Jays in 20th round in 2010; hit just .215/.304/.367 in Double-A in ’15 and was released by Phillies, then signed by Reds as a free agent in October; raw power but struggles with contact. Angels: Matt Williams, SS, Cardinals: Age 27, 15th round pick in 2011 from Liberty University, long-time Cards farmhand hit .263/.355/.346 in Triple-A; some OBP ability and steady infield glove but lacks power. Rockies: Anthony Bemboom, C, Angels: Age 26, 22nd round pick in 2012 from Creighton University, hit .222/.293/.305 in 239 at-bats in Double-A/Triple-A in ’16; athletic defensive catcher with a weak bat. Marlins: Cal Towey, OF, Angels: Age 26, 17th round pick in 2013 from Baylor University, hit .264/.376/.436 with 13 homers, 14 steals, 76 walks between Double-A and Triple-A; has some pop and a good throwing arm but has never really found a position. Royals: Kelvin Magallanes, RHP, Yankees: Age 22, from the Dominican Republic, posted 6.42 ERA in 34 innings in rookie ball with 27/18 K/BB; I have no data on him but a safe assumption is that he throws hard and doesn’t know how to pitch yet. Astros: Eduardo De Oleo, C, Diamondbacks: Age 23, from Dominican Republic, played in 21 games at three levels in ’16 hitting .261/.292/.435; strong throwing arm and has some pop but a raw receiver and has never played more than 78 games in a full season. Yankees: Jorge Saez, C, Blue Jays: Age 26, 32nd round pick in 2012 from Lee University, hit .260/.315/.495 with 12 homers in 192 at-bats in ’16 primarily in Double-A; threw out 40% of runners; older prospect but power, arm give him value as catching depth. Mariners: Paul Paez, LHP, Mets: Age 24, 38th round pick in 2013 from Rio Hondo College; short and stocky at 5-7, 210, excellent in High-A (1.00 in 36 innings, 28/5 K/BB) but hammered in Double-A (9.15 in 20 innings, 29 hits, but 27/7 K/BB), arm depth for upper levels. Cardinals: Austin Wilson, OF, Mariners: Age 24, second round pick in 2013 out of Stanford, hit .226/.338/.375 with 13 homers, 157 strikeouts in 368 at-bats in High-A; severe contact issues have prevented[...]



2016 MLB Rule 5 draft: Major League phase profiles

2016-12-08T12:59:40-05:00

Here are profiles for all players picked in the major league portion of the 2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft. Players selected in the minor league phase of the draft will follow in a separate article. 2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft results and profiles 1. Twins: Miguel Diaz, RHP, Brewers (traded to Padres): Diaz was originally signed by the Milwaukee Brewers out of the Dominican Republic in 2011. His development was initially slowed by control problems and an elbow injury but he earned notice in 2016 by posting a 3.71 ERA with a 91/29 K/BB in 95 innings for Wisconsin in the Low-A Midwest League, featuring a fastball up to 94-95 MPH and a slider which flashes plus. Age 22, he has a fair chance to stick in the back end of the Padres bullpen. 2. Reds: Luis Torrens, C, Yankees (traded to Padres): Torrens is from Venezuela and was signed by the New York Yankees as a free agent back in 2012 for $1,300,000. At the time he was viewed as having above-average potential on both offense and defense but a significant shoulder injury hampered his progress. He was limited to 52 games in 2016, hitting a combined .250/.350/.337 in 184 at-bats between the New York-Penn and South Atlantic Leagues. He has not tapped his power yet but has shown good plate discipline and threw out 40% of runners trying to steal this year, although he is vulnerable to giving up passed balls and needs to improve his receiving. Age 20, he needs playing time more than anything and it may be difficult for him to stick on the Padres bench without hurting his development. 3. Padres: Allen Cordoba, SS, Cardinals: Cordoba is from Panama and was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 2012. Both his 2015 (.342/.401/.421) and 2016 (.362/.427/.495) seasons were highly successful, although he has yet to play at any level higher than the Appalachian League. Cordoba features impressive tools including a strong throwing arm, shortstop-quality range, and better-than-average speed. He uses that speed very well, swiping 33 bases in 40 attempts over the last two years, and also does a good job making contact and controlling the strike zone. The main concerns here are lack of power and his birthday: he’s already 21 and the Cardinals promoted him quite slowly despite his strong performance. Like Torrens, he needs to play and it remains to be seen if the Padres can keep him on the roster without harming his career. 4. Rays: Kevin Gadea, RHP, Mariners: Gadea is from Nicaragua and was signed by the Mariners as a free agent back in 2012. He has performed very well at the lower levels, posting a 2.64 ERA in 225 career innings including a 2.15 ERA in 50 innings this past season for Clinton in the Low-A Midwest League, with a sharp 72/11 K/BB. Gadea is a 6-5, 190 pound right-hander, age 22, featuring a low-90s fastball, a solid-average breaking ball, and sharp control. He is a very intriguing sleeper prospect and should not be under-estimated. 5. Braves: Armando Rivero, RHP, Cubs: Rivero is a Cuban right-hander, signed by the Chicago Cubs back in 2013. He has spent the last two years pitching in the bullpen for the Iowa Cubs in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League and has been quite successful, posting a 2.13 ERA with a 105/35 K/BB in 68 innings in ’16, allowing just 41 hits. Listed at 6-4, 190, Rivero is older than most Rule 5 picks at age 28 due to his Cuban background but has nothing left to prove in Triple-A and is ready for a trial. His fastball runs in at 93-97 MPH and both his slider and splitter are strikeout pitches. His control is inconsistent, but he seems like a good bet to stick in the bullpen. 7. D-backs: Tyler Jones, RHP, Yankees: Tyler Jones was originally drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 11th round in 2011 from Louisiana State University. Signed by the Yankees as a free agent last year, he had a successful 2016 season for Double-A Trenton with a 2.17 ERA and a 67/11 K/BB in 46 innings, saving 11 games in 13 attempts. Jones is a 6-4, 240 pound right-hander age 27. He’s been clocked up to 96 and his breaking [...]



2016 MLB Rule 5 Draft Liveblog

2016-12-08T08:55:01-05:00

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The 2016 MLB Rule 5 draft begins at 9 AM Eastern Standard Time. Follow along with the picks here.

Round One
1. Twins: Miguel Diaz, RHP, Brewers
2. Reds: Luis Torrens, C, Yankees 
3. Padres: Allen Cordoba, SS, Cardinals
4. Rays: Kevin Gadea, RHP, Mariners
5. Braves: Armando Rivero, RHP,  Cubs
6. A's (Roster at 40)
7. D-backs: Tyler Jones, RHP, Yankees
8. Phillies (Roster at 40)
9. Brewers: Caleb Smith, LHP, Yankees
10. Angels: Justin Haley, RHP, Red Sox
11. Rockies: Pass
12. White Sox: Dylan Covey, RHP, Athletics
13. Pirates: Tyler Webb, LHP, Yankees
14. Marlins: Pass
15. Royals: Pass
16. Astros (Roster at 40)
17. Yankees: Pass
18. Mariners (Roster at 40)
19. Cardinals: Pass
20. Tigers: Daniel Stumpf, LHP, Royals
21. Giants: Pass
22. Mets (Roster at 40)
23. Orioles: Aneury Tavarez, OF, Red Sox
24. Blue Jays: Glenn Sparkman, RHP, Royals
25. Dodgers (Roster at 40)
26. Red Sox: Josh Rutledge, SS, Rockies
27. Indians Hoby Milner, LHP, Phillies
28. Nationals: Pass
29. Rangers: Mike Hauschild, RHP, Astros
30. Cubs Pass

Round Two
31. Reds Stuart Turner, C, Twins
32. Padres Pass
33. Diamondbacks Pass
34. Pirates Pass
35. Orioles Anthony Santander, OF, Indians
36. Blue Jays Pass
37. Indians Pass




White Sox trade Adam Eaton to Nationals for pitching prospects Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, and Dane Dunning

2016-12-07T18:21:44-05:00

On Wednesday afternoon the Washington Nationals acquired the outfielder they were looking for: Chicago White Sox flycatcher Adam Eaton. But the price was high: three premium pitching prospects, right-handers Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, and Dane Dunning. Let's take a look.Dane Dunning, RHP: Dunning is the least-known of the trio but has plenty of talent. Drafted in the first round this past June from the University of Florida, Dunning pitched 79 innings for the Gators during the spring, making five starts and 28 relief outings, posting a 2.29 ERA with an 88/12 K/BB with 68 hits allowed. In pro ball he posted 2.14 ERA in 34 innings in the New York-Penn League with a 29/7 K/BB.Dunning is a 6-4, 200 pound right-hander born December 20, 1994. The 21 year old features a sinking fastball at 90-94 MPH with peaks at 95-96, along with a very good change-up. His slider is inconsistent and needs more work, but with further refinement should be at least workable. He throws strikes most of the time and projects as a workhorse starter, though if he returns to the bullpen at some point he could be quite dominant. He rates as a Grade B/B- prospect right now. Lucas Giolito, RHP: Drafted in the first round in 2012 from high school in California, Giolito was widely-regarded as one of the very best arms in the class but saw his stock drop due to an elbow injury. He rehabbed Tommy John successfully and has been among the very best pitching prospects in baseball the last three seasons. In 2016 he posted a 2.97 ERA in 115 innings between Low-A, Double-A, and Triple-A with a 116/44 K/BB. He made four starts and two relief appearances in the majors, posting a 6.75 ERA with an 11/12 K/BB in 21 innings, giving up 26 hits.Giolito is 6-6, 255, born July 14, 1994. Although he entered 2016 as the top pitching prospect in baseball according to most observers, his poor major league performance has led to questions, not so much due to the weak stats, but more due to the radar gun: he topped out at 95 in the majors and averaged 93, well down from the 95-100 MPH readings reported in the minors. His curveball is excellent when it is on and his change-up can be at least average, but command and control of all his pitches were disappointing in his first look. The decline in fastball velocity and strikeout rate is worrisome, but given his overall track record and youth, Giolito remains a highly intriguing asset. He could still develop into an ace and rates as a Grade A-, but his stock dropped just enough to move him out of the untouchable prospect category. Reynaldo Lopez, RHP: The Nationals signed Lopez out of the Dominican Republic in 2012, giving him a small $17,000 bonus. That's turned out to be a terrific bargain given his development. He posted a 3.21 ERA in 121 innings between Double-A and Triple-A in 2016, with a 126/35 K/BB and just 90 hits allowed. He earned six starts and five relief outings in the majors, posting a 4.91 ERA with a 42/22 K/BB in 44 innings, but retains rookie eligibility for 2017. Lopez is listed at 6-0, 185, born January 4, 1994. He actually throws harder than Giolito at this point, averaging 96 MPH in the majors with peaks at 99. His curveball is a plus pitch, while the change-up varies between below-average and solid depending on the day. He did a decent job with his control in the minors but still needs additional command polish within the strike zone, mainly due to mechanical inconsistency. It remains uncertain if he starts or relieves in the long run, but looked more comfortable in the bullpen in the majors. He had an unusual reverse platoon split in the majors, limiting left-handed hitters to a .185/.291/.375 line while right-handers smashed him at .345/.415/.471. That seems like something that should be correctable given that his minor league splits were more normal. Right now he rates as a Grade B+ prospect, on the assumption that he still has a chance as a starter.Adam Eaton is one of my favorite playe[...]



Washington Nationals preliminary prospect grade breakdown

2016-12-07T17:02:46-05:00

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Here is the preliminary prospect grade breakdown distribution for 43 Washington Nationals prospects, listed below.

Grade A: Zero
Grade A-: One
Grade B+: Three
Grade B: Two
Grade B-: Seven
Grade C+: 10
Grade C: 20

There is play along the A-/B+ and B+/B boundaries.

Osvaldo Abreu, INF
Telmito Agustin, OF
Yasel Antuna, SS
Joan Baez, RHP
Nick Banks, OF
Tres Barrera, C
Rafael Bautista, OF
A.J. Cole, RHP
Jimmy Cordero, RHP
Matthew Crownover, LHP
Austin Davidson, 3B
Wilmer Difo, INF
Dane Dunning, RHP
Erick Fedde, RHP
Anderson Franco, 3B
Luis Garcia, SS
Lucas Giolito, RHP
Koda Glover, RHP
Brian Goodwin, OF
Kelvin Gutierrez, 3B
Daniel Johnson, OF
Carter Kieboom, SS
Spencer Kieboom, C
Andrew Lee, RHP
Jesus Luzardo, LHP
Reynaldo Lopez, RHP
Jose Marmolejos, 1B
Sheldon Neuse, 3B
Jake Noll, 2B
Blake Perkins, OF
Raudy Read, C
Jakson Reetz, C
Mariano Rivera, JR, RHP
Victor Robles, OF
Ian Sagdal, 2B
Pedro Severino, C
Juan Soto, OF
Andrew Stevenson, OF
Armond Upshaw, OF
Austin Voth, RHP
Drew Ward, 3B
Tyler Watson, LHP
Rhett Wiseman, OF




Washington Nationals preliminary prospect list

2016-12-07T14:26:25-05:00

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Here is the working research list of 43 Washington Nationals prospects. This system is not nearly as deep as some of those we have examined to this point.

Osvaldo Abreu, INF
Telmito Agustin, OF
Yasel Antuna, SS
Joan Baez, RHP
Nick Banks, OF
Tres Barrera, C
Rafael Bautista, OF
A.J. Cole, RHP
Jimmy Cordero, RHP
Matthew Crownover, LHP
Austin Davidson, 3B
Wilmer Difo, INF
Dane Dunning, RHP
Erick Fedde, RHP
Anderson Franco, 3B
Luis Garcia, SS
Lucas Giolito, RHP
Koda Glover, RHP
Brian Goodwin, OF
Kelvin Gutierrez, 3B
Daniel Johnson, OF
Carter Kieboom, SS
Spencer Kieboom, C
Andrew Lee, RHP
Jesus Luzardo, LHP
Reynaldo Lopez, RHP
Jose Marmolejos, 1B
Sheldon Neuse, 3B
Jake Noll, 2B
Blake Perkins, OF
Raudy Read, C
Jakson Reetz, C
Mariano Rivera, JR, RHP
Victor Robles, OF
Ian Sagdal, 2B
Pedro Severino, C
Juan Soto, OF
Andrew Stevenson, OF
Armond Upshaw, OF
Austin Voth, RHP
Drew Ward, 3B
Tyler Watson, LHP
Rhett Wiseman, OF




Houston Astros organization discussion

2016-12-07T09:01:00-05:00

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Discussing the future of the Houston Astros system.

I am now working on the Washington Nationals Top 20 prospects for 2017 list. The next team in line is the Houston Astros, to be followed by the St. Louis Cardinals, Tampa Bay Rays, San Francisco Giants, Texas Rangers, Philadelphia Phillies, and the Boston Red Sox.

Use this thread to discuss the Houston Astros organization. Some points for potential discussion include, but are certainly not limited to:

***The Astros finished 84-78 in 2016, third place in the American League Western Division. For 2017, is this team a bit over .500 again? Can they get back to 90 wins or better?

***Carlos Correa is still only 22 year old. No point here, I just wanted to mention that. Cool, isn't it?

***What's Alex Bregman's slash line for 2017?

***Can George Springer take another step forward in his age 27 season? Could that make him a non-Trout MVP candidate? Or is that a step too far?

***Do you agree with the Josh Reddick contract?

***Are you comfortable with the starting rotation as is?

***I know a lot of you are on this guy, but I think Franklin Perez (assuming good health caveat) could be a Top 10 MLB pitching prospect a year from now. Agree or disagree?

***As always, feel free to discuss sleeper prospects or anything else Astros-oriented.