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Preview: NPR Topics: Author Interviews

Author Interviews : NPR



NPR interviews with top authors and the NPR Book Tour, a weekly feature and podcast where leading authors read and discuss their writing. Subscribe to the RSS feed.



Last Build Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 07:57:15 -0400

Copyright: Copyright 2017 NPR - For Personal Use Only
 



Documentary Filmmaker On The Personal Essays In 'You Don't Look Your Age'

Sat, 29 Apr 2017 07:57:15 -0400

NPR's Scott Simon talks with award-winning documentary filmmaker Sheila Nevins about her new book, You Don't Look Your Age...And Other Fairy Tales.



Inside 'The Black Hand' Crime Wave A Century Ago

Sat, 29 Apr 2017 07:57:14 -0400

Stephan Talty's The Black Hand tells the story of the Black Hand crime wave that gripped New York City in the early 1900s and the one policeman who took it on. He talks with NPR's Scott Simon.



Whose Side Was She On? 'American Heiress' Revisits Patty Hearst's Kidnapping

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 13:26:00 -0400

Legal expert Jeffrey Toobin says Hearst, who was abducted in 1974 and declared allegiance to her captors, "responded rationally to the circumstances." Originally broadcast Aug. 3, 2016.



What Did Ancient Romans Eat? New Novel Serves Up Meals And Intrigue

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 07:00:00 -0400

In ancient Rome, food was a bargaining chip for position for slaves and nobles alike. At the center of Feast Of Sorrow is real-life nobleman Apicius, who inspired the oldest surviving cookbook.



Paula Hawkins Prepares To Dive 'Into The Water'

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 05:04:00 -0400

Author Paula Hawkins was down on her luck when her 2015 book The Girl on the Train became a smash hit. Now she's grappling with success and preparing to launch her followup, Into the Water.



Michael Bloomberg And Carl Pope On 'Climate Of Hope'

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 05:03:00 -0400

Rachel Martin speaks with former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former chairman of the Sierra Club Carl Pope about how cities should respond to climate change. Their book is Climate of Hope.



'Just Show Up': Sheryl Sandberg On How To Help Someone Who's Grieving

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 17:09:00 -0400

The Facebook executive lost her husband in 2015. She says, "Rather than offer to do something, it's often better to do anything. Just do something specific." Her new book is called Option B.



Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 12:44:00 -0400

Dr. Elizabeth Ford treated mentally ill inmates in New York City for more than a decade. It was almost universal, she says, that they had suffered abuse or significant neglect as children.



'Janesville' Looks At A Factory Town After The Factory Shuts Down

Sun, 23 Apr 2017 17:53:45 -0400

Washington Post reporter Amy Goldstein talks about her book Janesville: An American Story, that's about a factory town in Wisconsin that lost its lifeblood when its factory shut down.



'Thunder In The Mountains' Tells Tragedy Of Two Strong, Opposing Leaders

Sun, 23 Apr 2017 17:53:00 -0400

Daniel Sharfstein's new book Thunder In the Mountains sheds new light on the Nez Perce Indian wars, and the two historical figures on each side of the conflict: Chief Joseph and Oliver Otis Howard.



In Ann Brashare's Latest, Two Kids From A Fractured Family Meet At Last

Sun, 23 Apr 2017 08:07:00 -0400

The author behind the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series writes from experience — her parents divorced when she was young, and she says the divisions remain "to this day."



Chemo Scrambled My Brain

Sun, 23 Apr 2017 05:00:30 -0400

After an incorrect dose of a chemotherapy drug for Crohn's disease caused Anne Webster's bone marrow to shut down, she decided that, if she survived, she'd write about her experience.



Author Alison MacLeod Tries To Find Humor In Terrorism

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 08:14:30 -0400

In her new book of short stories, Alison MacLeod spins biography, news stories and family history into surreal fiction. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly asks her about All the Beloved Ghosts.



Dark Lives Of 'The Radium Girls' Left A Bright Legacy For Workers, Science

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 08:14:00 -0400

Kate Moore's new book digs into the short, painful lives of the Radium Girls, who worked painting luminous dials on watches and clocks — and were poisoned by the glowing radium paint they used.



'Girls & Sex' And The Importance Of Talking To Young Women About Pleasure

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 13:24:00 -0400

Author Peggy Orenstein says that when it comes to adolescent sexuality, the subject of girls' pleasure is often left unspoken. Originally broadcast March 29, 2016.