Subscribe: SFGate: Leah Garchik
http://www.sfgate.com/rss/feeds/lgarchik.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
art  bay  day  francisco  love  overheard  quotes  romance  san francisco  san  time  valentine’s day  valentine’s  year   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: SFGate: Leah Garchik

Leah Garchik





 



Will you still love me tomorrow? Valentine’s Day, Part III

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

Wednesday, Feb. 14, is the big day, when flowers are being sent, chocolates are being devoured and couples are staring into each other’s eyes over glasses of Champagne. Or not. Although true love has nothing to do with harassment and bullying, romance may have gotten a punch in the nose in this #MeToo era. A survey of 1,008 Americans, taken for Ebates.com in January, found that 46 percent won’t buy Valentine’s gifts for anyone this year, and that 44 percent of Americans plan to spend less than $25. The survey-takers also found that the least favorite Valentine’s Day flower is the Venus flytrap. Enjoy the day, and keep love alive. And accept however it turns out.



Going to the chapel and we’re gonna get married: Valentine’s Part II

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

The how-do-you-dos are over, and prospects for the future are casting either gloomy shadows or glorious sunshine on the lovers. The chronological story of romance, in overheard quotes, continues. COMPARING ‘I MIGHT’ WITH ‘I DO’ •“I may not know my blood type, but I certainly know my ring size.” (Middle-aged woman to man, overheard at Brenda’s restaurant by David Steinberg) •“Are you crazy? No way am I giving you a ring. Have some coffee.” (Man to woman, overheard in a San Francisco coffee shop by Nancy Lipsitz) •“I was like, ‘You don’t know me! You don’t even know how to propose to me.



Going to the chapel and we’re gonna get married: Valentine’s Part II

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

The how-do-you-dos are over, and prospects for the future are casting either gloomy shadows or glorious sunshine on the lovers. The chronological story of romance, in overheard quotes, continues. COMPARING ‘I MIGHT’ WITH ‘I DO’ •“I may not know my blood type, but I certainly know my ring size.” (Middle-aged woman to man, overheard at Brenda’s restaurant by David Steinberg) •“Are you crazy? No way am I giving you a ring. Have some coffee.” (Man to woman, overheard in a San Francisco coffee shop by Nancy Lipsitz) •“I was like, ‘You don’t know me! You don’t even know how to propose to me.



Let’s do it, let’s fall in love: Valentine’s Day, Part I

Sun, 11 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

Once again, with Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s time to spill the spoken beans about romance. All year, every year, a good percentage of conversation is about romance: Looking for it, reveling in it, analyzing it, ending it and building it into a lifetime commitment. And all year, I collect quotes. So today is the first day of the annual three-day story of love, as told in quotes overheard by listeners all around us. FREE-RANGE HOPING •“When I said I was hungry, I meant sexually.



Overheard: How SF talks about love, sex and relationships is like no other city

Sun, 11 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

Once again, with Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s time to spill the spoken beans about romance. All year, every year, a good percentage of conversation is about romance: Looking for it, reveling in it, analyzing it, ending it and building it into a lifetime commitment. And all year, I collect quotes. So today is the first day of the annual three-day story of love, as told in quotes overheard by listeners all around us. FREE-RANGE HOPING •“When I said I was hungry, I meant sexually.



San Francisco Chronicle rallied the public for a big wave

Mon, 5 Feb 2018 14:00:00 UT

In preparation for the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I — an event that left us with the War Memorial Building and Opera House as civic markers — Ken Maley has been reading through The Chronicle’s archives. Maley discovered that on Oct. 6, 1918, a month before the armistice, The Chronicle organized the making of a movie. Citizens of San Francisco were invited to come to a location in Golden Gate Park to be filmed waving to the soldiers fighting in France. The headline on a Page One story that ran on Oct. 4: “Entire City Is Aroused Over Chronicle Movie Plan.



Singer Wesla Whitfield is ‘at peace’ as she enters hospice care

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 21:35:22 UT

The subject line in an email from Mike Greensill, received Monday, brought me up short: “Wesla — Time to leave the room.” The attached note from his wife, singer Wesla Whitfield, was addressed to “Friends and Fans,” first thanking them “for all the love and devotion you’ve given me over the years. I’ve had a wonderful time making music for you, but it’s become time to leave the room.” The words “tumor” and “infection” are mentioned, with reassurances: She’s comfortable, she’s at home, she has hospice, and she’s not going to have any major interventions. Whitfield built a national reputation as one of the greatest interpreters of the American songbook.



At Fog fair, art-lovers revel in the moment and in art-making

Sun, 14 Jan 2018 22:08:47 UT

We first came upon Kohei Nawa’s “PixCell-Maral Deer,” a full-size reindeer covered with shimmering glass orbs. The Japanese artist, whose first solo show at the Pace Gallery opens on Thursday, Jan. 18, stood beamingly by it as art lovers at Fog Design and Art crowded around the work, a showstopper. A news release said this wondrous object is a “taxidermied maral deer,” encased by the artist in “different-sized cells ... created through the use of glass beads.” Inside, said the artist in halting English, is a stuffed animal. But on the outside, the glass spheres look wet, mysterious and although you know they’re heavy, ethereal. (Asking price: $500,000.



SFMOMA’s maitre d’ to art lovers

Fri, 22 Dec 2017 08:01:00 UT

At noon on the Monday after Thanksgiving, Rosemarie McKeon was at her podium near the entrance to Cafe 5 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, greeting patrons, handing them menus and showing them her cell phone picture of that day’s curried vegetable soup. Her description, “Soup à la Rauschenberg,” referred to the “Robert Rauschenberg, Erasing the Rules” retrospective in the museum. It was golden brown, with accents of orange carrot and purple cauliflower. McKeon works for McCall’s Catering, and she’s been on the job greeting hungry artists and art-lovers since the museum re-opened. If life without art is bare, life without food is impossible. Her grace has guaranteed her a place at the SFMOMA table.



San Francisco wakes up to mourn its mayor

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 18:31:18 UT

The last time I saw Mayor Ed Lee was just before Thanksgiving at the San Francisco Interfaith Council Prayer Breakfast, when the thrust of his remarks was that San Francisco would remain a sanctuary city, despite pressures to change that policy. Although his demeanor was always polite and even deferential to the power players with whom he shared the public playing field, and although the effects of his pro-growth policies were often questioned by advocates for the homeless and for housing, on this issue of sanctuary, you could feel his satisfaction in strongly stating a position so in keeping with progressive San Francisco values.



Opera about Gold Rush shadows cast on 21st Century America

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 00:33:25 UT

In a “Girls of the Golden West” pre-premiere conversation onstage at the San Francisco Opera House on Tuesday, Nov. 21, director/librettist Peter Sellars, along with longtime opera collaborator and composer John Adams, told dramaturg Kip Cranna they’ve been working on the project for years because “everyone’s always talking about California.” Sellars seemed turned on, animated, eager to share ideas — perfect qualities for a collaborator. He and Adams have worked on the operas “Nixon in China,” “The Death of Klinghoffer” and “Doctor Atomic.” “What John’s music gives you,” said Sellars, “is the sound of America. ... The heartbreak is there at the same time as the idealism.




Band Together Bay Area backstage snapshots

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 17:23:19 UT

A view from behind the stage at Band Together Bay Area, the mega concert organized by major local leaders to assist victims of last month’s North Bay fires: •Emcee Renel Brooks-Moon, sitting with her husband, Tommie, poring over the script and rundown for the Thursday, Nov. 9 event at AT&T Park. “I’ve been so sad since Charlottesville,” she said. “It’s been one tragedy after another. But this is the best part of what I do.” Onstage between every act, she was self-assured, enthusiastic ... and she never looked at a piece of paper. That’s not an accident. Offstage, she studied hard, breaking concentration only to exchange warm greetings with Barry Bonds.



Musicians band together in SF to benefit North Bay fire victims

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 14:25:35 UT

An eclectic group of artists, most of whom grew up or gained fame in the Bay Area, took the stage Thursday night at AT&T Park to help raise millions of dollars for victims of the North Bay fires. The names kept getting bigger for the sold-out Band Together Bay Area benefit concert, with Rancid, G-Eazy and Dead & Company giving impassioned performances and Metallica closing out the night. But the top billing belonged to the audience, including a front section reserved for first responders, volunteers and community members who lost their homes.




Paving over Yosemite and other great ideas

Tue, 7 Nov 2017 21:57:38 UT

Following up on the item in which a reader suggested that the all-new Department of the Interior might preside over coal mining in the Marin Headlands, readers have suggested some other mixed uses for national parks. I mean, what’s the use of them if we can’t monetize? Larry Jones suggests that Yosemite, with its valley, would be an ideal landfill site. And Michael Jory suggests Yosemite National Park and Ride. “Why not pave over every single national park and turn them into parking lots?” The beauty of that suggestion, of course, would be that changing the signs wouldn’t be that expensive. All they have to do is add “ing” to the “Yosemite National Park.



MoAD stresses keeping black art and culture strong in San Francisco

Sat, 4 Nov 2017 04:35:54 UT

The Museum of the African Diaspora’s Afropolitan Ball on Saturday, Oct. 28, raised more than a million bucks, which more than met the monetary goal of this all-out swanky party. But there sure was a larger purpose: “Together,” said the inside of the program for the “Shades of Black” party, “we will keep black art and culture in our city.” If it seems there are fewer and fewer blacks in San Francisco, this was an occasion for the city’s most prominent members of that community — including Willie Brown, honorary co-chairman of the event with Lloyd Dean of Dignity Health — to put on their best duds, party with old pals and confirm their place in the city’s cultural mosaic.