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Full Episode for September 30, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From the Liberals LNG decision angering environmentalists and throwing a lifeline to the NDP, to Montreal's pit bull ban and if banning breeds really works, to Attica prisoner that still resonates today... This is The Current with Laura Lynch.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160930_88767.mp3




45 years after Attica massacre tensions in America's prisons still high

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

It's been 45 years since Attica became a byword for excessive police force. The prisoner uprising and bloody crackdown were products of their time that still resonate today. The Current looks into how Attica's legacy lives on in America's crowded jails.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160930_17031.mp3




Stop targeting pit bulls! Evidence shows bans don't work, say critics

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

To some, pit bull dogs are beloved pets. But to others, they are violent, snarling menaces. And Montreal has come down on the side of those who believe pit bulls must be banned for the sake of public safety. But does banning specific breeds really work?


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160930_73039.mp3




LNG decision broke Canada's promise to be climate change world leader, says environmentalist

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau argues his government is striking the right balance between growing economy and protecting the environment with the conditional approval of the LNG pipeline. But some say it's a startling reversal of campaign promises.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160930_88837.mp3




Full Episode for September 29, 2016 - The Current

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From debating if the Syrian crisis should be called a holocaust, to journalist David Cay Johnston on how Trump - the businessman - operates, to Canada's Minister of Public Safety on Bill C-51... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160929_70298.mp3




More oversight of national security agencies coming, says Ralph Goodale

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The Current follows up on security issues in Canada with Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale to ask what happened to all those Liberal election promises to amend the Harper government's anti-terror bill, C-51.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160929_87019.mp3




Investigative journalist explains the making of Trump as a businessman

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As Donald Trump campaigns for the U.S. presidency, everything from his taxes, to his net worth, to the deals he made is a blur of contradictory numbers. David Cay Johnston shares his insights after following the numbers to understand the making of Trump.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160929_87976.mp3




The power of a word: Is it time to call Syrian atrocities a holocaust?

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The bombing of eastern Aleppo has become relentless. Victims are overwhelmingly civilians — many are children. The devastation is so great, so deliberate, some have begun to characterize it as a holocaust. Others say that is neither factual nor accurate


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160929_15024.mp3




Full Episode for September 28, 2016 - The Current

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From New York Times' Maureen Dowd on the fear and anger of the 2016 U.S. election, to burnt out author Anna Katharina Schaffner on the history of exhaustion, to a mother who created a mental health centre devoted to youth... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160928_68582.mp3




Mom opens youth mental health centre after struggle to get daughter treatment

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Stella Green Sanderson was 16 when she was in need of psychiatric help that simply wasn't available due to a long waiting list. Today her mother's opened a non-profit mental health centre in her name specifically to help youth.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160928_38517.mp3




History of exhaustion reveals burnout not unique to modern age

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

With the prevalence of burnout, stress and sleeplessness in daily life, you'd think exhaustion is a malady of our times. But it turns out, we've been running on empty for thousands of years. The Current looks back on the history of exhaustion.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160928_18087.mp3




'Running for president is the new selfie': NYT's Maureen Dowd

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Although many pundits have pronounced a winning first debate performance for Hillary Clinton, New York Times' columnist Maureen Dowd who has scrutinized her record and trajectory over years in the political spotlight still have questions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160928_57755.mp3




Full Episode for September 27, 2016 - The Current

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From an analysis of the first Clinton-Trump televised debate, to a difficult conversation with Harold R. Johnson about alcohol and Indigenous people, to neurotechnology that's linking different people's brains together... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160927_91933.mp3




How brain-machine connections can help paraplegics move again

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Researchers are connecting human brains via computer and have seen one person's brain move another's body. The meeting of mind over machine is a breakthrough that could help paralyzed patients rewire rewire their brains, but it comes with ethical issues.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160927_34730.mp3




Indigenous people need to tell their stories of sobriety, says lawyer

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Harold R. Johnson is an Indigenous crown prosecutor and says alcohol is killing his people. He is urging for a new narrative on alcohol abuse, finding inspiration in those who overcome rather than thinking there are only those who succumb.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160927_86065.mp3




What just happened? The Current's take down on 1st presidential debate

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

It was must-watch television, cringe politics and alternately delicious and poisonous electoral jockeying, but how will American voters react? The Current dissects last night's Clinton-Trump presidential debate where fact and fiction make a dizzying blur.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160927_43672.mp3




Author learns dark truth about lobotomist grandfather and his famous patient

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

For decades, scientists studied Patient H.M. who was lobotomized in his late 20s. Now the grandson of the doctor who performed that surgery has pieced together his grandfather's track record of brain surgeries raising uncomfortable ethical questions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160926_55458.mp3




Syria's White Helmets leader says hope keeps rescue team focused

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

An extraordinary rescue team of Syrian civilians called The White Helmets run toward the scene of an attack to try to save lives. The team has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for saving tens of thousands of lives during Syria's civil war.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160926_28674.mp3




Full Episode for September 26, 2016 - The Current

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Canada's plans to remove branding from tobacco packaging, to The Syrian Civil Defense, aka The White Helmets nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize, to the story of Dr. Scoville, Patient H.M. and pushing the limits of science... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160926_14811.mp3




Moments of Disruption: How Jasmeet Singh used comedy to diffuse anger facing racism

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Jasmeet Singh grew up in Guelph, Ont. He is Sikh. He wears a turban. And he felt the sting of racism growing up. But the bullying he experienced in high school set him on a path toward a surprising career — becoming one of Canada's biggest YouTube stars.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160926_67154.mp3




'Nothing to do with public health': Big Tobacco fights Canada's plain packaging plans

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Cigarette packaging is about to lose volume in the U.K. and in France, as both countries follow Australia's lead with regulations forcing plain cigarette packaging in 2017. And Canada is moving closer to parallel these regulations.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160926_44889.mp3




Full Episode for September 23, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From insurance companies wanting to be exempt from a genetic discrimination bill, to B.C.'s foreign owner's tax challenged by a class action lawsuit, to a documentary that follows ISIS' online recruitment process... This is The Current with Laura Lynch.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160923_44327.mp3




Documentary reveals how ISIS recruits young radicals on social media

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

ISIS is notorious for courting western youths online — turning social media into a recruitment tool. So filmmaker Martin Himel decided to see for himself how the process works and documents his journey meeting an ISIS recruiter in Undercover in ISIS


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160923_32815.mp3




Bill to protect genetic discrimination sparks debate with insurance industry

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Scientific advances have allowed us to know more about our genetic makeup. But for some, genetic testing may risk getting insurance. Parliament is debating a new bill meant to put a stop to genetic discrimination but insurers are warning against it.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160923_58173.mp3




Foreign buyers sue B.C. over property sales tax

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Sales began dropping almost right away after B.C. imposed a new tax mean to cool down a hot housing market. Data shows the slide is continuing. But a class action lawsuit claims the province is running afoul of the constitution and international treaties.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160923_74302.mp3




Full Episode for September 22, 2016 - The Current

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Canada's commitment to negotiate China's extradition treaty, to an Alabama lawyer on the links between lynching and death row, to how torture documents could be the basis of a criminal investigation into the RCMP... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160922_56582.mp3




'Very clear line' between lynching and death penalty: Alabama lawyer

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Bryan Stevenson goes to work every day on a mission — to get black men off Alabama's death row. The author and lawyer shares how the legacy of slavery and lynching still lives in America today in his book, Just Mercy.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160922_29288.mp3




Canadians tortured in Syria: Lawyer calls for investigation into RCMP

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Earlier this week, CBC's Terence McKenna told us about a trove of documents he'd obtained relating to the three Canadians tortured in Syria. Law professor Amir Attaran says the documents could form the basis of a criminal investigation into the RCMP.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160922_54993.mp3




Extradition treaty with China signals troubling trade-offs, say critics

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As Canada works on negotiating an extradition treaty with China, critics say there will be no way to monitor compliance in a country with torture and a death penalty. Supporters say new extradition and trade treaties are far better than the status quo.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160922_10034.mp3




Full Episode for September 21, 2016 - The Current

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Saskatchewan doctors calling for the government to declare a public health state of emergency, to negotiating peace between FARC and the Colombian government, to a study suggesting gut feelings are more important than we think... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160921_59501.mp3




What does gut instinct have to do with being a successful trader?

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

New research suggests those who trust their guts when making a decision may be more successful. Meet a former stock trader turned neuroscientist whose research looking into the science of gut feelings could help you reap dividends.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160921_26761.mp3




How a haunting home invasion changed the course of Jill Goldberg's life

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Ten years ago, a moment changed Jill Goldberg's life forever. It was late at night when she was sleeping and a stranger entered her Montreal apartment. The trauma left a serious impact but says the experience created something positive.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160921_70414.mp3




Inside 4 years of secret negotiations to reach Colombia's peace agreement

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Dag Nylander used every diplomatic trick he knew to edge the Colombian government and its decades-old adversary FARC toward a peace deal. Eventually, the cool, diplomatic guidance of this Norwegian succeeded in disrupting a five-decade-long conflict.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160921_86931.mp3




Rising HIV rates in Saskatchewan push doctors to call for state of emergency

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

People are dying of HIV/AIDS in Saskatchewan at a rate 4-times higher than the rest of Canada. Indigenous people are disproportionately affected. Doctors in the province who treat those with HIV say this is nothing less than a public health emergency.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160921_12163.mp3




Full Episode for September 20, 2016 -The Current

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From critics questioning Canada's commitment to refugees, to Doonesbury cartoonist Garry Trudeau on his draw to Donald Trump, to a loneliness epidemic for seniors... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160920_37855.mp3




Loneliness in Canadian seniors an epidemic, says psychologist

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

New research suggests that the experience of loneliness can be as bad for your health as smoking or obesity. With as many as 1.4 elderly Canadians reporting feeling lonely some are calling this a public health crisis that needs to be addressed.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160920_43514.mp3




Doonesbury cartoonist says not drawing Trump would be 'comedy malpractice'

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Doonesbury cartoonist Gary Trudeau began including Donald Trump in his comic strip 30 years ago. His early portrayals turned out to be prophetic on the political front. After sketching Trump for decades, Trudeau shares some of his YUGE! opinions.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160920_51059.mp3




Frustrated sponsorship groups call on government for more resources to settle refugees

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As Canada announces an increase in aid for the resettlement of Syrian refugees, millions in charitable donations from Canadian sponsorship groups remains frozen — leaving families stuck in refugee camps and caught in the system.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160920_34108.mp3




The Current for September 19, 2016 - The Current

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From obtained torture documents involving RCMP and CSIS working with Syrian and Egyptian interrogators, to how an orca changed the world view of whales in captivity, to the Trudeau family's unique relationship with China... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160919_35332.mp3




Alexandre Trudeau shares unique relationship family has with China

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Canada may have a unique relationship with the Trudeau family. But the Trudeaus have a unique relationship with China. In Chairman Mao's day, China was a special place for the former prime minister. In the 21st century, Alexandre Trudeau feels its pull.Al


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160919_83568.mp3




Documents reveal CSIS and RCMP's role in torture of 3 Canadians in Syria

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Under great political and public pressure to identify potential terrorist suspects, RCMP emails newly obtained by CBC News indicate Canada's national police force knew what was in store for three Canadians who were tortured in Syria.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160919_16784.mp3




How Moby Doll changed the world view of 'monster' orca whales

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

At one time the orca — or killer whale — was seen as a terrifying monster. But then a wounded orca named Moby Doll ended up in Vancouver and in no time at all once —frightened Vancouverites fell in love. Meet the disruptor who paved the way for Shamu.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160919_21307.mp3




Can the Monsanto-Bayer deal change the image of GMOs?

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

This week Monsanto agreed to be taken over by the pharmaceutical company, Bayer at a price of $66 billion. There's a chance genetically altered seeds may still be sold but without the brand name, could this move change the conversation on all things GMO?


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160916_80837.mp3




Full Episode for September 16, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From the Monsanto-Bayer take over potentially changing the discussions on GMOs, to the disappearance of Deborah Campbell's fixer in Damascus, to the legal challenges people in polyamorous relationships face... This is The Current with Piya Chattopadhyay.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160916_32244.mp3




Polyamorous families want Canadian law to catch up with their relationships

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As unconventional, multi-person partnerships become more mainstream in Canadian society, The Current gets a first-hand look into legal challenges polyamorous families face such as getting benefits, doing taxes and filling out government forms.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160916_18762.mp3




'Real heroes': Journalist highlights invaluable role of fixers in foreign reporting

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Journalist Deborah Campbell tells remarkable stories in her book, A Disappearance in Damascus. It's the story of her fixer, the trusted emissary relied on by foreign correspondents to get the story. But in the case of Ahlam, she became the story herself.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160916_34268.mp3




Advocates call for public registry for sperm donors and offspring

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Advocates are calling for a mandatory public registry for sperm donors and offspring. They say there are important legal and public health benefits to tracking sperm donation. Currently, the only privately-run registry relies on voluntary information.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160915_95385.mp3




Inuit demand input over division of Franklin expedition artifacts

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

This month, HMS Terror — one of the ships from the Franklin expedition — was found in an Arctic Bay. While many history buffs are excited by the news, it raises questions of sovereignty for Inuit people who want input over the division of the artifacts.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160915_14749.mp3




Full Episode for September 15, 2016 - The Current

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From whether Canada should use airships to transport food to the North, to the discovery of HMS Terror — one of the ships from the Franklin expedition, to the Liberals' aim to balance expanding pipelines while reducing emissions... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160915_97937.mp3




Liberal agenda to reduce emissions while expanding pipelines is contradictory, say critics

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Just before parliament resumes, The Current looks at what's on the Liberal's agenda and if it's even possible to balance approving pipelines while aiming to reduce emissions. Some say that just doesn't make sense.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160915_99445.mp3




How airships could make life more affordable in northern Canada

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The high cost of groceries in First Nations communities in the North, and Arctic, has a Winnipeg man calling on Canada to use airships to transport food and supplies to the North - a move he says would significantly reduce the cost of living.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160915_63775.mp3




How Dr. Brian Williams changed his life in a moment

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The story of a personal moment of disruption from a U.S. trauma surgeon who surprised himself by speaking up in the face of a tragic shooting last summer.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160914_13919.mp3




Full Episode for September 14, 2016 - The Current

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Calgary's fluoride debate and advocates calling for more public funding of dental care, to author JD Vance on his hillbilly roots, to what the return of the federal sponsorship scandal in the news means for the Liberal Party... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160914_77634.mp3




Liberal sponsorship scandal trial recalls perception of party entitlement

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

More than a decade after details of the federal sponsorship scandal outraged a nation, the trial of a key player and close Chretien ally has begun. The Current looks at how the scandal's legacy has shaped the direction of today's governing Liberal party.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160914_99735.mp3




Yale University hillbilly J.D. Vance on learned helplessness in America

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance grew up between the Rust Belt and Appalachia surrounded by poverty, anger and love. Part of a culture that he says is in crisis in America today and that feeds into the politics playing out in this U.S. election year.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160914_66939.mp3




Study suggests more tooth decay in Calgary kids after end of water fluoridation

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Professionals in dental health believe there's a link between tooth decay and Calgary's choice five years ago to pull fluoride out of the water. But the city's elected officials aren't interested in the details.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160914_19199.mp3




Full Episode for September 13, 2016 - The Current

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From coverage of Hillary Clinton's health condition deemed as sexist, to half-siblings who share the same sperm donor meeting for the first time, to non-white lawyers in Canada who say they're not treated the same as white peers... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160913_32197.mp3




Non-white lawyers in Canada call out racial profiling in justice system

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Toronto lawyer Selwyn Pieters has filed a lawsuit alleging humiliating treatment based on his race by the Law Society of Upper Canada. Now other lawyers who say they have faced similar situations are speaking up about racial bias in the court system.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160913_76234.mp3




'I always wanted a sister': 3 half-siblings of same sperm donor meet for first time

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

A new U.S. donor sibling registry allows children of sperm donors to connect with their half-siblings, from far and wide. The Current follows the story of a brother and two sisters who share the same anonymous sperm donor and meet for the first time.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160913_64945.mp3




Coverage of Hillary Clinton's health is sexist, says media watcher

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

News of Hillary Clinton's pneumonia diagnosis has fueled her critics' viral outrage over the transparency of her health and character. But supporters say the real fever is over the fact she's female. Is the Clinton campaign in crisis?


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160913_90090.mp3




Full Episode for September 12, 2016 - The Current

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From sounding the alarm on North Korea's nuclear tests, to controversy and criticism following Nate Parker in the film The Birth of A Nation, to a new film documenting the tragedy of the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160912_48563.mp3




Documentary offers unflinching look into migrant crisis in Mediterranean

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The tiny Italian island of Lampedusa has been thrust into the centre of Europe's migration crisis. Now a new bold documentary shows us a year in the life of the island - for its residents, migrants passing through and those trying to make a difference.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160912_89422.mp3




Nate Parker's Birth Of A Nation: can you separate art from the artist?

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation is one of the most talked about movies at this year's Toronto International Film Festival. For many, Parker's history involving a sexual assault charge raises complex questions about whether to even see the film.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160912_20762.mp3




North Korea's nuclear test cause for alarm, experts warn

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Analysts are warning North Korea's continued nuke testing goes beyond basic posturing and is extremely dangerous for the region, and the world. The Current explores North Korea's nuclear weapons potential.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160912_92719.mp3




Full Episode for September 9, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From the rights of mentally ill patients and parents who want more say in their health care, to novelist Anosh Irani on Mumbai's child sex trade, to a filmmaker's exploration of East Germany's Stasi police... This is The Current with Piya Chattopadhyay.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160909_56547.mp3




Documentary explores legacy of East Germany's Stasi secret police

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

During life in communist East Germany, the Stasi secret police were everywhere. It meant neighbours spied on each other and no one really knew who was who. For filmmaker Petra Epperlein, that included her father. Her documentary explores Karl Marx City.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160909_34589.mp3




Anosh Irani sheds light on Mumbai's child sex workers in The Parcel

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Novelist Anosh Irani takes us into Mumbai's red light district in his latest novel, The Parcel. The light he sheds on the dark corner of reality reveals harsh truths about child sex workers in Mumbai. But it's ultimately redeeming.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160909_53311.mp3




'Brian should be alive today': Mother of man who committed suicide says health system failed him

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Parents of mentally ill adult children are calling for more involvement over the health care of their children admitted to hospital. The Current speaks to Lorraine Johnson who lost her son to suicide and says the system failed him.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160909_17702.mp3




Ontario law strengthens workplace harassment investigations, says lawyer

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Employment lawyer, Janice Rubin says Ontario's Bill 132 is game-changing. It's the first time in Canada where employers are obligated to investigate both, complaints and incidents of harassment, and also must train employees on this issue.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160908_56310.mp3




Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall will endanger wildlife, says scientist

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Donald Trump and his supporters have a plan for a wall on the U.S. Mexican border. But a wall authorized by George W. Bush is already there, and it's affecting everything from wildlife migration to flooding.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160908_56914.mp3




Full Episode for September 8, 2016 - The Current

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Conservative leadership candidate Kellie Leitch's proposal to screen immigrants for "anti-Canadian values," to a documentary that examines how mainstream media misses deception, to how Trump's border wall endangers wildlife... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160908_23629.mp3




'All Governments Lie' documentary takes aim at mainstream media, investigative reporting

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The documentary, All Governments Lie argues mainstream, corporate, U.S. media rolls over, not only for government but for commerce. Filmmaker Fred Peabody and journalist Amy Goodman discuss what the media misses, allowing deceptions to go uncovered.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160908_87675.mp3




Kellie Leitch makes the case for screening new immigrants for 'anti-Canadian values'

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Conservative leadership candidate Kellie Leitch is proposing to screen would-be immigrants for "anti-Canadian values." Many politicians and pundits are critical of this move, but Leitch says this is a conversation Canada needs to have.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160908_64706.mp3




Full Episode for September 7, 2016 - The Current

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Judge Robin Camp facing a review of his fitness to remain on the bench, to part two of our discussion on a new Renaissance with Chris Kutarna, to a lawsuit against B.C.'s ban on the purchase of private insurance... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160907_45418.mp3




Should Canadians have access to private surgery clinics?

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Eight years ago, Dr. Brian Day began his court challenge to have private health insurance for surgery in private clinics. It is a case with the potential to reshape our health-care system. But health advocates foresee negative consequences for Canada.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160907_28912.mp3




Pt 2: What the Renaissance can teach us about our disruptive age

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Age of Discovery author Chris Kutarna is back. Yesterday, he argued we are.living through a second Renaissance. Today, he finds similarities in the populist politics of the 1400's and the words of a certain presidential candidate just over our border.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160907_49435.mp3




Robin Camp case: High stakes for sexual assault cases in judicial review

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Justice Robin Camp made headlines when he asked a 19-year-old complainant in a sexual assault case why she couldn't "just keep her knees together." Now, the judge is facing a judicial review and shinning a spotlight on how, or if judges are disciplined.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160907_49570.mp3




Full Episode for September 6, 2016 - The Current

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From a road trip to Virginia searching for voter insights into the U.S. election, to author Chris Kutarna who says we're lucky to be living through what he calls a new renaissance, to the homework load Canadian students face... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160906_41893.mp3




School homework hurts learning and well-being, says parent

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As students return to school, some families are pushing for no homework for their kids saying there's no evidence that homework helps academic achievement. Critics say homework can actually hurt both learning and overall well-being.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160906_14856.mp3




What the renaissance can teach us about Trump and our disruptive age

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Undeniably, we're living in an age of disruption. From breakneck advances in technology; to staggering wealth inequality, and global terrorism. Author Chris Kutarna says it's the best time in history to be alive in what he calls a new renaissance.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160906_57904.mp3




Travel Virginia's Crooked Road to hear what average Americans think of the U.S. election

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Follow The Current's Anna Maria on the road to Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains as she meets voters and asks them which U.S. president candidate should occupy the White House.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160906_46878.mp3




Full Episode for September 5, 2016 - The Current

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From concern over how to resolve Canada's faltering economy to Ethiopian marathoner Feyisa Lilesa's political protest at the finish line to anxious students heading back to school in Fort McMurray... This is The Current.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160905_28761.mp3




Back to school: Emotional challenges ahead for refugee and Fort McMurray students

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The first day of school has been looming on the calendar, all summer long. Tomorrow is a hard day for some kids. The Current checks in on Syrian refugees starting a new grade and Fort McMurray students who had to flee before the end of the school year.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160905_46177.mp3




Ethiopian marathoner Feyisa Lilesa says going home 'means suicide' after Olympic political protest

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

His marathon run in the Rio Olympic games won him the silver medal. But his defiant protest at the finish line, he says, has earned him the enmity of the Ethiopian government. Feyisa Lilesa explains why he says he can't go home again.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160905_20986.mp3




GDP numbers worst since 2009, critics argue government needs to fix faltering economy

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Canada's GDP numbers reveal a faltering economy and critics argue more needs to be done to fix our economic situation. With key members of the Liberal's economic team at the G20, it's time to ask what fiscal forensics mean to Canada's financial future.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160905_10442.mp3




Full Episode for September 2, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 02 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From research that shows how the benefits of vacations are short-lived, to Aboriginal painter Roy Henry Vickers on how art helped him beat a life-threatening addiction... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160902_37734.mp3




ENCORE: Artist Roy Henry Vickers on making art, beating addiction and turning 70

Fri, 02 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The B.C. artist, carver, designer and storyteller, Roy Henry Vickers, explains how art helped him beat a life-threatening addiction, and says he's now eager to create and share Aboriginal stories.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160902_56248.mp3




Benefits from vacation short-lived, research suggests

Fri, 02 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

As summer comes to a close, The Current examines the latest research on the long-term benefits of taking time off. What is the ideal length of a holiday? Does a staycation have the same effect as a vacation abroad?


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160902_67661.mp3




Full Episode for September 1, 2016 - The Current

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From skyrocketing home energy costs in Ontario causing energy poverty to a powerful pig named Esther changing lives around the world... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160901_59058.mp3




ENCORE: How Esther the Wonder Pig is changing lives

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Esther is a powerful pig. Her parents, Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter quit their jobs, stopped eating meat and bought a farm thanks to Esther the Wonder Pig. And she's been changing lives ever since.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160901_83258.mp3




'People have to choose between heating and eating': Ontario hydro bills cause 'energy poverty'

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Ontario's energy minister may not be calling energy prices a crisis, but many in the province would beg to disagree. With skyrocketing hydro bills forcing many into 'energy poverty,' Ontarians are calling on the government to lower rates.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160901_16283.mp3




Full Episode for August 31, 2016 - The Current

Wed, 31 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From revelations that tens of millions of dollars in UN aid is going to Syrian president Bashar al-Assad to why First Nations students in Northern Ontario travelling to Thunder Bay for high school are dying... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160831_32086.mp3




ENCORE: Thunder Bay inquest examines death of 7 First Nations high school students

Wed, 31 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Seven First Nations students, each dead under bewildering circumstances over the period of a decade, found in Thunder Bay where they'd moved for school. The Current's Marc Apollonio speaks with the families hoping for answers with the inquest.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160831_47289.mp3




Millions in UN aid for Syria paid to Assad-linked companies

Wed, 31 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

An investigation by the Guardian newspaper has revealed the United Nations has paid tens of millions of dollars in aid money to the Assad regime and businesses close to it. Critics are calling the UN "morally bankrupt" but the UN says it's complicated.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160831_11427.mp3




Full Episode for August 30, 2016 - The Current

Tue, 30 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From an American psychiatrist rule against weighing in on the mental well-being of high-profile politicians such as Donald Trump to a filmmaker who has devoted his life to tracking the Siberian Tiger... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160830_20099.mp3




ENCORE: Researcher tracks Siberian tigers for months crouched in freezing hole

Wed, 31 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

In remote Siberia, ecologist Chris Morgan joined renowned tiger researcher Sooyong Park to document his methods, a man observing three generations of tigers in the harsh Siberian landscape. Chris Morgan comes out of the cold to share his experience.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160830_50720.mp3




Mental health professionals must speak out against Trump, says psychologist

Tue, 30 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

Since 1973, the American Psychiatric Association has not allowed its members to analyze politicians' personalities from afar. But some psychiatrists say Trump breaks the mould and the stakes are too high to not comment on the Republican candidate.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160830_66438.mp3




Full Episode for August 29, 2016 - The Current

Mon, 29 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From Trudeau's visit to Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai before the annual G-20 meeting to reset Canada's relationship with China to three terror attack survivors on living with the experience... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160829_30997.mp3




Full Episode for August 26, 2016 - The Current

Fri, 26 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

From a special committee looking into electoral reform in response to the Liberals' promise to abolish the first-past-the-post system to uncorking the world of fine wine fraud... This is The Current with Robyn Bresnahan.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160826_46853.mp3




ENCORE: Sour Grapes documentary uncorks high-end world of fine wine fraud

Fri, 26 Aug 2016 04:00:00 GMT

The biggest wine fraud in history is the subject of the documentary, Sour Grapes. It's a story about the astronomically wealthy, an obsession with fine wines worth tens-of-thousands of dollars and the con man who duped them all.


Media Files:
http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/current_20160826_61911.mp3