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Preview: Comments on Notes of an Anesthesioboist: Composition and Decomposition

Comments on Notes of an Anesthesioboist: Composition and Decomposition





Updated: 2017-12-14T15:13:38.901-05:00

 



The good thing is, there are a lot of connections ...

2007-06-28T23:31:00.000-04:00

The good thing is, there are a lot of connections between the two, teaching and psychiatry/medicine, and she'll probably be able to blend elements of both, whichever she chooses. Thank you for reading!



In this and an earlier post I was particularly str...

2007-06-28T23:24:00.000-04:00

In this and an earlier post I was particularly struck by what you said about teachers. They can give so much; yet also destroy so much. My younger daughter is debating between psychiatry and teaching (though she's still got plenty of time) but is worried that teaching is not challenging enough! I think I'll show her what you've written.



Yes, I did wonder, and I gave her a name in my min...

2007-06-28T23:06:00.000-04:00

Yes, I did wonder, and I gave her a name in my mind, just so she wouldn't be simply "our cadaver." If I can ever find the poem I wrote about the whole anatomy class experience, I'll post it. In it I basically have a conversation with my cadaver, and she tells me a little about herself - that her arms held tightly the people she loved, that she laughed and sang, that her eyes wept real tears, etc.

At the end of every academic year Fr. Pravetz organizes a memorial service for those who donated their bodies to our school and invites family members to come and hear tributes from the med school class that took anatomy that year. Strict anonymity of the donors is maintained. The students write letters, do readings, play music, or offer whatever else that expresses their gratitude and respect. I choreographed a dance piece entitled "Psaume" to one of Bruckner's choral motets, the one that starts with "Os justi meditabitur..." and recruited a few classmates to rehearse and video tape it to be shown at the service.

Sometimes I think people think med students and doctors don't actually care, but we did.

As for whatever becomes of us later - your thoughts remind me of Ezekiel 37:

1 The hand of the LORD was upon me, and he brought me out by the Spirit of the LORD and set me in the middle of a valley; it was full of bones. 2 He led me back and forth among them, and I saw a great many bones on the floor of the valley, bones that were very dry. 3 He asked me, "Son of man, can these bones live?"
I said, "O Sovereign LORD, you alone know."
...5 This is what the Sovereign LORD says to these bones: I will make breath enter you, and you will come to life. 6 I will attach tendons to you and make flesh come upon you and cover you with skin; I will put breath in you, and you will come to life...
"...14 I will put my Spirit in you and you will live... "



I've thought about donating my body for this sort ...

2007-06-28T22:39:00.000-04:00

I've thought about donating my body for this sort of thing. (After my dad died this January and I saw how much funeral homes take and what a bunch of junk that all is I thought, "There must be something better ...?") Anyway, I'm not concerned about what they do with me after I'm outa here. (I do believe in a resurrection of the body, but I think God can do miracles of recreating bodies since he can do anything.) Anyway, I've also thought I'd just want to have a little toe tag that says a little bit about who I was. Did you ever wonder about the people who inhabited those bodies? I wonder.