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Published: Mon, 05 Dec 2016 19:26:09 -0800

Last Build Date: Mon, 05 Dec 2016 19:26:09 -0800

 



How to reinstall Windows 10 without any bloatware

Mon, 05 Dec 2016 03:00:00 -0800

Patrick Scott bought some laptops for his kids, but they were so slow the kids stopped using them. This is a common issue with bloatware-laden consumer laptops, sadly. He performed a “factory reset,” with the hopes of reinstalling the OS without all the crap that was preinstalled. To his horror he discovered the factory reset reinstalled all the bloatware, leaving him back where he started. 

Luckily for Patrick, there’s a way to get a clean installation of Windows 10, without all the apps that came with your PC. Here’s how it works. 

1. From Windows 10’s Start menu, go to Settings > Update & security > Recovery. You can also get there from the traditional Control Panel by clicking Recovery. At the bottom of that window, click the long hyperlink that reads, “If you’re having problems with your PC, go to Settings...

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How to turn off autoplay on Netflix kids' profiles

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 05:00:00 -0800

Netflix makes it so easy to keep an entire family’s viewing habits separate thanks to multi-user profiles on a single account. But one thing that’s not so easy—or at least not obvious—is how to stop TV show episodes from auto-playing on a child’s profile.

Binge watching is lots of fun, but not if you’re trying to curb your kids’ viewing time. With auto-play turned on you’re always checking for when the credits start on your kids’ favorite show. An easier strategy is just to turn off auto-play, but it’s not obvious how to do that on a kids’ profile.

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9 free ways to get the most out of Google's Play Music app

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 03:30:00 -0800

“Subscribe now!” blares the banner at the bottom of Google’s Play Music control panel, and indeed, everything about the just-revamped app seems to be shilling for its subscription streaming service, particularly the new auto-generated radio stations that sit (quite stubbornly) in Play Music’s Home tab.

But even if you don’t want to cough up $10 a month to play a streaming shuffle on your phone, there’s still plenty of free stuff to like in Google’s Play Music app for Android and iOS.

For example, you can bring pretty much your entire music collection wherever you go once you upload your tunes and create and save “instant mixes” based on any of your songs. There’s also an offline mode and bandwidth settings to keep you from blowing through your mobile data, an equalizer for teasing the best sound out of your headset, and even a sleep timer so you can doze off to your most soothing playlist.

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How to defer Windows 10 updates

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 08:12:00 -0800

Forced updates in Windows 10 have their appeal. For Microsoft, it helps keep the majority of its users on the same build of Windows 10, reducing legacy support issues. For users, it keeps your system up-to-date and reduces the chances of getting hit with malware that takes advantage of unpatched systems.

But some folks resent the idea of having updates forced on them—especially when some of those updates cause problems or won’t install properly. If you’re running Windows 10 Home you’re at the mercy of Microsoft’s update schedule (though we have some tips for you at the end of this article). Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise users, however, have the opportunity to defer certain types of updates.

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How to download Windows Store apps with a local account

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 05:00:00 -0800

It’s common knowledge that if you decide to go all Windows 7 in Windows 10 and create a local user account, you get shut out of the Windows Store. You can open the Store of course, but you can’t download anything without signing in with a Microsoft Account. That changed recently, as first noted by Into Windows.

It’s not clear when the change took place: Microsoft could’ve quietly added this ability over the summer with the Anniversary Update, or only just recently just flipped the switch for everyone. Whatever happened, you no longer need a Microsoft Account to download free apps from the Windows Store. If this feature doesn’t work for you, try updating your version of Windows 10 to make sure you’re on the latest stable build.

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How to send GIFs with the Google Keyboard in Android Nougat

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 09:45:00 -0800

Sending a GIF is a great way to add some humor or otherwise break up the monotony of a conversation.

In Android 7.1 Nougat, the Google Keyboard gives you this capability with just a couple of taps. The implementation is a little awkward, but once you learn the right steps it’ll be second nature.

When writing a message, tap the smiley icon, which launches the emojis screen. You'll then see a GIF button on the lower right.

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It’s a two-step process to access the GIFs in Google Keyboard.

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How to use Bing Saves to prepare for the holidays

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 05:00:00 -0800

Microsoft recently introduced Bing Saves, which is a similar service to Google Save. It lets you quickly save videos and images from various search results for later perusal.

There are three primary kinds of search results that work with Bing Saves: shopping, images, and video. Here’s how you can use Bing Saves to keep track of everything from gift lists to recipes this holiday season. To use Bing Saves you’ll need to be signed in to your Microsoft account on Bing.

Video cooking tutorials

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Let’s say you’re searching for information on how to brine a turkey. You’d search for that on Bing, select the Videos tab, and hover over a video you’re interested in. Once you’ve hovered over the video, click the Save option in the bottom-left corner of the video’s tile.

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How to stop animated GIFs in Chrome and Firefox

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 07:00:00 -0800

Some people find them annoying but animated GIFs can be a lot of fun, at least the first few times you see them. After that they tend to lose their appeal, especially when you’re trying to read something right next to them. Most of the major browsers don’t offer a built-in way to control them. For those who care, however, you can take control of animated GIFs on Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox through the magic of add-ons and extensions.

Google Chrome

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Animation Policy for Google Chrome.

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How to use Skype without an account

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 05:00:00 -0800

Skype recently added an interesting new feature that allows anyone to use the free version of the messaging app without an account. To use it without an account, you must use Skype for Web; however, account holders can still join in using a regular Skype client.

This is an extension of a feature Skype rolled out in October 2015, which allowed Skype users to add non-Skype users to their conversations.

When you use Skype’s account-free options, you’re considered a guest. All conversations are based on a unique link that you can share with anyone you want to talk to over Skype. Guest conversation links last for 24 hours and allow up to 300 people to have a text chat, or up to 25 people to participate in a voice or video call.

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Facebook privacy settings: How to control your ad preferences

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 03:54:00 -0800

Facebook targets ads based on your activity. You can check--and change--what it thinks your interests are in Ad Preferences.


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8 Android gestures that speed up everyday tasks

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 03:00:00 -0800

Navigating your way around a new Android device will get a lot easier once you’ve mastered a few handy touchscreen gestures.

For example, you can switch between Chrome tabs with a single swipe, while a two-finger swipe will add a whole new perspective to Google Maps. No sign of the virtual Home button? There’s a gesture that’ll bring it back. Read on for all that and more.

A quicker way to get to your Quick Settings

When you swipe down from the top of the screen on your unlocked Android device, you’ll see a small row of buttons sitting at the top of your various notifications (or in the very top corner of the screen, on pre-Nougat handsets). These are your so-called “quick settings”—a series of one-tap buttons that’ll let you do things like turn Wi-Fi on and off, switch on your phone’s flashlight mode, or toggle Airplane Mode.

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A new Chrome feature automatically mutes multiple tabs

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 11:20:00 -0800


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3 encryption tools for Linux that will keep your data safe

Mon, 14 Nov 2016 04:55:00 -0800

Encryption is an interesting thing. The first time I saw encryption in action was on a friend’s Gentoo Linux laptop that could only boot if the USB key with the boot partition and decryption key was inserted. Cool stuff, from a geek point-of-view.

Fast forward, and revelations from Edward Snowden and ongoing concerns about government snooping are slowly bringing encryption and privacy tools into the mainstream. Even if you’re not worried about a Big Brother or some shady spy-versus-spy scenario, encryption can still protect your identity and privacy if your laptop is stolen. Think of all the things we keep on laptops: contact information, financial information, and client and company information. All of that data is worthy of protection. Luckily, Linux users have access to several tools for the affordable price of free.

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Everything you need to know about Windows 10 recovery drives

Mon, 14 Nov 2016 03:00:00 -0800

You never know when you’ll need a Windows recovery drive, so the time to make one is now—and it’s very easy to do. 

A recovery drive is similar to the media you’d receive if you bought a pre-built system. Back in the day, PCs would ship with a CD or DVD that included an image of the system as it left the factory. If your PC’s OS went sideways, you could easily revert to the way things were on day one (though you’d lose all of your subsequently created data and applications, obviously). Nowadays manufacturers usually just put an image of the system as it left the factory on a hidden partition of your main drive.

A Windows recovery disk builds on this idea. In addition to letting you reinstall Windows, it includes several troubleshooting tools, which can be a lifesaver if your system won’t boot.

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How to save your Vine videos right now

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 06:00:00 -0800

Short-form video creators everywhere were dumbstruck at the end of October when Twitter announced it was killing Vine. There’s still no word on when Vine might see its final day, and there are rumors that Twitter may sell Vine to a third-party, giving the service new life.

But the fact is Vine’s fate is still uncertain, and anyone who can’t get enough of their seven second videos should back up their memories. It’s likely Twitter will provide a way for users to export and save their videos should the end truly come.

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How to create Motion Paths in PowerPoint

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 05:00:00 -0800

The best thing about PowerPoint is the animation. Building motion into slideshows makes them come alive like no static images could ever hope to do. It’s going to get even more interesting when PowerPoint gets 3D capabilities with the Windows 10 Creators Update due in early 2017.

In order to make things move in PowerPoint, your objects need a path (called a motion path) to travel from one location to another. Setting up the motion path used to be tedious, but now it’s a simple, straightforward procedure.

1. Create an object

First, you must either create an object or insert one from the online clip art collection or your hard drive.

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When your Windows 10 login password fails, you need a recovery drive

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 13:26:00 -0800

The Windows 10 login password went amiss for Albert Pye and about a dozen others who wrote to me saying they couldn't log into their PCs. In every instance they had not touched their computer nor changed anything, yet all of a sudden their password or PIN was incorrect.

Microsoft hasn’t acknowledged it specifically in its update log, so that makes me think it’s a strange brew of circumstance and hardware/software malfunction, perhaps some problem with the installation of an update. These workarounds could help you. 

First, try using the on-screen keyboard to enter your password or PIN, as I’ve read that could work when your regular input devices don't. Click the Ease of Access icon (it looks like a sort of clock with a dotted circle) in the lower right-hand corner of the screen. 

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The easy way to save Facebook videos

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 07:23:00 -0800

Mike wants to save a video from Facebook. Luckily if you’re using a desktop or laptop PC it’s quite easy.

I can almost hear you saying, “Hold on Josh—when I watch a Facebook video on my PC there aren’t any links to save it!” Correct, but all you have to do is trick your browser into thinking you’re browsing Facebook on your phone. Here are the steps:

Right-click any non-Youtube video and select Show video URL

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Right-click the video and select Show video URL.

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How to download and save a Facebook video

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 07:11:00 -0800

Facebook doesn’t officially provide links to videos for you to save. But all you have to do is trick your browser into thinking you’re browsing Facebook on your phone.


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How to make Chrome warn you before closing

Tue, 08 Nov 2016 05:00:00 -0800

Personally, I don’t like browsers that throw up a warning dialog box when you try to close them with multiple tabs open. But I recently discovered that a lot of people do like this functionality, especially when they have dozens of browser tabs loaded. Unfortunately for those users, Chrome doesn't offer a warning box (even as an advanced option) on Windows.

If you want to see a warning before closing Chrome here’s a quick solution. Admittedly, it’s a bit of a hack, but it works.

Open the website Prevent Close by Germany-based developer Michael Armbruster. This website uses JavaScript to throw up a dialog box that asks you if you’re sure you want to leave that specific website.

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3 handy apps for iOS-to-Android switchers

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 03:30:00 -0800

As smoothly as my recent switch from iOS to Android went, I still felt like I had unfinished business left on my old iPhone. For example, I was annoyed that my wife’s iCloud calendar events weren’t showing up in my new Calendar app for Android, and I missed getting Find My Friend alerts whenever she left the office to head home. I was particularly bummed that I couldn’t respond to text messages from my Mac, like I could with iMessage.

With the help of a trio of essential apps, though, I’ve solved my lingering calendar and Find My Friend problems, and I’m now sending and receiving text messages from my Mac with ease. Indeed, I’m starting to like some of my new Android helper apps more than the iOS tools they’re replacing.

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5 terminal commands every Linux newbie should know

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 03:00:00 -0800

I’m a big fan of the anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion. One of the quotes from it that stands out in my head is, “Man fears the darkness, and so he scrapes away at the edges of it with fire.” For newcomers to the world of Linux, the black screen of the terminal can seem like a deep, foreboding darkness, which is desperately replaced by a GUI whenever possible. It doesn’t have to be that way.

A graphical user interface makes modern computing more enjoyable and easier to use the majority of the time. After all, placing an Amazon order using a text-mode browser in a terminal sounds like an over-enthusiastic exercise in masochism. We like our GUIs and graphical browsers, but there are times when you’ll find yourself in the world of the command line. Like any new tool, knowing a few basics can keep your blood pressure in check when a GUI fails to start, or you need to perform maintenance.

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6 things you'll miss if you switch from iOS to Android

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 03:30:00 -0700

So I finally did it—I made the switch from iOS to Android, and I’m gleefully doing things that were never possible on my iPhone, from pinning contacts to the home screen and swiping notifications any which way, to picking a new SMS app and unlocking my phone with my face. All in all, I’m a happy camper.

But I’d be lying if I said there was nothing I missed about iOS. Indeed, there are a bunch of tiny touches on my old iPhone that I never appreciated until they were gone, like Safari’s easy-on-the-eyes Reader Mode and being able to scoot the top of the tall screen down within reach. Some of these features you can replace if you make the switch; others, though, you’ll have to do without.

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5 reasons to opt for a Linux rolling distro vs. a standard release

Wed, 02 Nov 2016 03:30:00 -0700

There are a lot of reasons I recommend Ubuntu to Linux newbies. It’s well supported, reasonably stable, and easy to use. But I prefer to roll with Arch Linux myself. It has several compelling attributes, but one of its biggest pluses is that Arch is a rolling-release distribution.

What?

If you’re using Linux for the first time, there’s a pretty good chance your OS is what’s called a “versioned release” distribution. Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, and Mint all release numbered versions of their respective operating systems. By contrast, a rolling-release distribution eschews versions altogether. Here are a few of the things you can expect from a rolling release.

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How to add a Hibernate option to the Windows 10 Start menu

Tue, 01 Nov 2016 12:31:00 -0700

At the end of every day do you still dutifully close every file and program window before shutting down your PC? That’s the standard way to handle things, but for quite a few versions of Windows, Microsoft also offered the ability to use Sleep and Hibernate modes instead of just a regular shut down.

In Windows 10, however, Microsoft decided not to include hibernate with the rest of the shut down options under Start > Power by default. The good news is it’s easy to put the option back.

Why hibernate?

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A hibernate option in Windows 10 under Start > Power.

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How to free up space with storage tools in Android 7.1

Mon, 31 Oct 2016 09:49:00 -0700

Squeezing out enough storage space is one of the ever-present struggles of smartphone life. 

Android 7.1 brings some integrated tools to handle this all in one spot. To check out what’s here, go to Settings > Storage.

As with previous versions of Android, you’ll see a breakdown of storage used by category.

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Android lays out your storage situation in clear terms.

However, check out a new tool by selecting Manage Storage at the top of the list. You’ll see an option for Smart Storage, which when toggled on will automatically remove backed up photos and videos when your phone's storage is almost full. If you have a Pixel (the first phone with Android 7.1), you get free storage at full resolution. 

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Google Drive dumps Windows XP and Vista, now what?

Mon, 31 Oct 2016 09:00:00 -0700


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How to customize Windows 10 colors

Fri, 28 Oct 2016 05:50:00 -0700

Denise wanted to know why she couldn’t adjust the colors of her windows in Windows 10 like she could in Windows 7. The simple answer is, “because Microsoft has hidden it.”

Before I show you where to find this hidden setting, know that I’m talking about being able to adjust the look of the colors included with Windows 10, not how to change the colors themselves, nor am I referring to the cool new Dark Mode that was included with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. 

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Min Vid Test Pilot experiment gives Firefox a YouTube picture-in-picture mode

Fri, 28 Oct 2016 05:00:00 -0700

Firefox has a Test Pilot experiment that hardcore YouTube fans will want to grab right away. The new experiment is called Min Vid, and it allows users to watch YouTube videos in a “picture-in-picture” mode. That way you can continue to browse and get work done while still watching your video.

But that doesn’t even describe the half of it. Mozilla’s experimental feature places a web-based persistent video player on your desktop that is “always on top” no matter which app or program you’re using.

You can deal with email in Outlook, or fill out data on a spreadsheet, and that YouTube video will keep on going in an unobtrusive mini-player.

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How to Get Windows XP's Quick Launch Bar In Windows 10

Fri, 28 Oct 2016 03:00:00 -0700

The beloved Quick Launch Bar from Windows XP lives on in Windows 10, providing easy access to specific folders and files from the taskbar. Here’s how to get it.


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How to keep your Linux PC safe from exploits

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 05:00:00 -0700

As with any big piece of software, Linux is complex, and difficult for outsiders to comprehend. That’s why it’s not terribly shocking that a 9-year-old Linux kernal vulnerability, known as Dirty COW, wasn’t patched until just a few days ago on October 20.

First off, here’s a quick reminder of what Linux is: Linux is a kernel, just one piece of software in the GNU/Linux OS, with the GNU suite of tools making up the majority of the base operating system. That said, the kernel is one of the keys to the OS, allowing the software to interact with hardware. Linux’s importance to servers and infrastructure means that a lot of eyes are constantly looking at the kernel. Some of those eyes belong to employees at companies like IBM or Red Hat who are paid to work on it full-time. That’s pretty impressive for a piece of software that’s freely given away.

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6 smart settings to make your Android phone anticipate your needs

Wed, 26 Oct 2016 03:00:00 -0700

There's no denying that our smartphones have made our lives so much easier, putting our contacts and schedules, our driving directions, the whole internet, right at our fingertips. But if you're using an Android phone you might be leaving even more convenience on the table.

There are a bunch of super-smart settings in Nougat and Google Now that’ll make your Android device feel like it’s 10 steps ahead of you. Your Android phone can be proactively telling you how long it’ll take to get to work in the morning, and nudging you when your favorite team is about to take the field. Your device can keep itself unlocked whenever it’s on you, and those snapshots you just took can automatically be arranged into beautiful collages. Battery running low? Android can know to dial down background activity to keep your phone alive. And if you love the idea of asking Google questions without ever touching your phone, you can train your phone to do that, too.

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Disable Autoplay Settings In Windows 10

Wed, 26 Oct 2016 03:00:00 -0700

Use the AutoPlay settings to keep malicious files from downloading to your PC. Here's how.


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How to pin the Recent Items folder to File Explorer in Windows 10

Tue, 25 Oct 2016 05:00:00 -0700


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