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Preview: Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast



Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.



 



Coddled puppies don’t do as well in school, some trees make their own rain, and the Americas were probably first populated by ancient mariners

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on new satellite measurements that suggest the Amazon makes its own rain for part of the year, puppies raised with less smothering moms do better in guide dog school, and what DNA can tell us about ancient Greeks’ near mythical origins with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Lizzie Wade about coastal and underwater evidence of a watery route for the Americas’ first people. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Lizzie Wade; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170811.mp3




The biology of color, a database of industrial espionage, and a link between prions and diabetes

Thu, 03 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease in chimps, a potential new pathway to diabetes—through prions—and what a database of industrial espionage says about the economics of spying with Online News Editors David Grimm and Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi talks to Innes Cuthill about how the biology of color intersects with behavior, development, and vision. And Mary Soon Lee joins to share some of her chemistry haiku—one poem for each element in the periodic table. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Zoltan Tasi/Unsplash; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170804.mp3




DNA and proteins from ancient books, music made from data, and the keys to poverty traps

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on turning data sets into symphonies for business and pleasure, why so much of the world is stuck in the poverty trap, and calls for stiffening statistical significance with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to news writer Ann Gibbons about the biology of ancient books—what can we learn from DNA, proteins, and book worm trails about a book, its scribes, and its readers? Listen to previous podcasts. [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170728.mp3




Paying cash for carbon, making dogs friendly, and destroying all life on Earth

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the genes that may make dogs friendly, why midsized animals are the fastest, and what it would take to destroy all the life on our planet with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Seema Jayachandran about paying cash to Ugandan farmers to not cut down trees—does it reduce deforestation in the long term? Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Kerrick/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170721.mp3




Still-living dinosaurs, the world’s first enzymes, and thwarting early adopters in tech

Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week, we have stories on how ultraviolet rays may have jump-started the first enzymes on Earth, a new fossil find that helps date how quickly birds diversified after the extinction of all the other dinosaurs, and a drug that may help reverse the effects of traumatic brain injury on memory with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic and special guest Carolyn Gramling. Sarah Crespi talks to Christian Catalini about an experiment in which some early adopters were denied access to new technology and what it means for the dissemination of that tech. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Michael Wuensch/Creative Commons Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_20170714.mp3




Odorless calories for weight loss, building artificial intelligence researchers can trust, and can oily birds fly?

Thu, 06 Jul 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the twisty tree of human ancestry, why mice shed weight when they can’t smell, and the damaging effects of even a small amount of oil on a bird’s feathers—with Online News Editor David Grimm.  Sarah Crespi talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about a special section on how artificial intelligence is changing the way we do science.  Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: © 2012 CERN, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ALICE COLLABORATION; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_2017_07_07.mp3




A Stone Age skull cult, rogue Parkinson’s proteins in the gut, and controversial pesticides linked to bee deaths

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 16:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on what the rogue Parkinson’s protein is doing in the gut, how chimps outmuscle humans, and evidence for an ancient skull cult with Online News Editor David Grimm. Jen Golbeck is back with this month’s book segment. She interviews Alan Alda about his new book on science communication: If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? Sarah Crespi talks to Jeremy Kerr about two huge studies that take a nuanced looked at the relationship between pesticides and bees. Read the research in Science: Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees, B.A. Woodcock et al. Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops, Tsvetkov et al. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: webted/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170630.mp3




Why eggs have such weird shapes, doubly domesticated cats, and science balloons on the rise

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the new capabilities of science balloons, connections between deforestation and drug trafficking in Central America, and new insights into the role ancient Egypt had in taming cats with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Mary Caswell Stoddard about why bird eggs come in so many shapes and sizes. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image:; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170623.mp3




Slowly retiring chimps, tanning at the cellular level, and plumbing magma’s secrets

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week we have stories on why it’s taking so long for research chimps to retire, boosting melanin for a sun-free tan, and tracking a mouse trail to find liars online with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Allison Rubin about what we can learn from zircon crystals outside of a volcano about how long hot magma hangs out under a volcano. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170616.mp3




How to weigh a star—with a little help from Einstein, toxic ‘selfish genes,’ and the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week we have stories on what body cams reveal about interactions between black drivers and U.S. police officers, the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils, and how modern astronomers measured the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein—with Online News Intern Ryan Cross. Sarah Crespi talks to Eyal Ben-David about a pair of selfish genes—one toxin and one antidote—that have been masquerading as essential developmental genes in a nematode worm. She asks how many more so-called “essential genes” are really just self-perpetuating freeloaders? Science Careers Editor Rachel Bernstein is also here to talk about stress and work-life balance for researchers and science students. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170609.mp3




A new taste for the tongue, ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies, and early evidence for dog breeding

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on how we taste water, extracting ancient DNA from mummy heads, and the earliest evidence for dog breeding with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to John Travis about postsurgical cognitive dysfunction—does surgery sap your brain power? Listen to previous podcasts. [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170602.mp3




How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles

Thu, 25 May 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not-so-distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm. Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first data from the Juno mission, including what Jupiter’s poles look like and a peak under its outer cloud layers. Listen to previous podcasts.  [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170526.mp3




Preventing augmented-reality overload, fixing bone with tiny bubbles, and studying human migrations

Thu, 18 May 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on blocking dangerous or annoying distractions in augmented reality, gene therapy applied with ultrasound to heal bone breaks, and giving robots geckolike gripping power with Online News Editor David Grimm. Deputy News Editor Elizabeth Culotta joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a special package on human migrations—from the ancient origins of Europeans to the restless and wandering scientists of today. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170519.mp3




Our newest human relative, busting human sniff myths, and the greenhouse gas that could slow global warming

Thu, 11 May 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week we have stories on ancient hominids that may have coexisted with early modern humans, methane seeps in the Arctic that could slow global warming, and understanding color without words with Online News Intern Lindzi Wessel. John McGann joins Sarah Crespi to discuss long-standing myths about our ability to smell. It turns out people are probably a lot better at detecting odors than scientists thought! Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Streluk/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170512.mp3




Podcast: Reading pain from the brains of infants, modeling digital faces, and wifi holograms

Thu, 04 May 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week, we discuss the most accurate digital model of a human face to date, stray Wi-Fi signals that can be used to spy on a closed room, and artificial intelligence that can predict Supreme Court decisions with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Caroline Hartley joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a scan that can detect pain in babies—a useful tool when they can’t tell you whether something really hurts. Listen to previous podcasts. See more book segments.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170505.mp3




Podcast: Where dog breeds come from, bots that build buildings, and gathering ancient human DNA from cave sediments

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 16:00:00 -0400

This week, a new family tree of dog breeds, advances in artificial wombs, and an autonomous robot that can print a building with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Viviane Slon joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a new way to seek out ancient humans—without finding fossils or bones—by screening sediments for ancient DNA.   Jen Golbeck interviews Andrew Shtulman, author of Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong for this month’s book segment.    Listen to previous podcasts.   See more book segments.     Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: nimis69/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/show-template48k_mixdown.mp3




Podcast: When good lions go bad, listening to meteor crashes, and how humans learn to change the world

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:45:00 -0400

This week, meteors’ hiss may come from radio waves, pigeons that build on the wings of those that came before, and a potential answer to the century-old mystery of what turned two lions into people eaters with Online News Editor David Grimm. Elise Amel joins Julia Rosen to discuss the role of evolution and psychology in humans’ ability to overcome norms and change the world, as part of a special issue on conservation this week in Science. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript  Transcripts courtesy Scribie.com  [Image: bjdlzx/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170421.mp3




Podcast: Watching shoes untie, Cassini’s last dive through the breath of a cryovolcano, and how human bias influences machine learning

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, walk like an elephant—very far, with seeds in your guts, Cassini’s mission to Saturn wraps up with news on the habitability of its icy moon Enceladus, and how our shoes manage to untie themselves with Online News Editor David Grimm. Aylin Caliskan joins Sarah Crespi to discuss how biases in our writing may be perpetuated by the machines that learn from them. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170414.mp3




Podcast: Giant virus genetics, human high-altitude adaptations, and quantifying the impact of government-funded science

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, viruses as remnants of a fourth domain of life, a scan of many Tibetan genomes reveals seven new genes potentially related to high-altitude life, and doubts about dark energy with Online News Editor David Grimm. Danielle Li joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study quantifying the impact of government funding on innovation by linking patents to U.S. National Institutes of Health grants. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: artubo/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170407.mp3




Podcast: Killing off stowaways to Mars, chasing synthetic opiates, and how soil contributes to global carbon calculations

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, how to avoid contaminating Mars with microbial hitchhikers, turning mammalian cells into biocomputers, and a look at how underground labs in China are creating synthetic opioids for street sales in the United States with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Caitlin Hicks Pries joins Julia Rosen to discuss her study of the response of soil carbon to a warming world. And for this month’s book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to Rob Dunn about his book Never Out of Season: How Having the Food We Want When We Want It Threatens Our Food Supply and Our Future. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170331.mp3




Podcast: Teaching self-driving cars to read, improving bike safety with a video game, and when ‘you’ isn’t about ‘you’

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, new estimates for the depths of the world’s lakes, a video game that could help kids be safer bike riders, and teaching autonomous cars to read road signs with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Ariana Orvell joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study of how the word “you” is used when people recount meaningful experiences. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: VisualCommunications/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170324.mp3




Podcast: The archaeology of democracy, new additions to the uncanny valley, and the discovery of ant-ibiotics

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170317.mp3




Podcast: Human pheromones lightly debunked, ignoring cyberattacks, and designer chromosomes

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 16:15:00 -0500

This week, how Flickr photos could help predict floods, why it might be a good idea to ignore some cyberattacks, and new questions about the existence of human pheromones with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Sarah Richardson joins Alexa Billow to discuss a global project to build a set of working yeast chromosomes from the ground up. Read Sarah Richardson’s research in Science. Listen to previous podcasts.   Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: Drew Gurian; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170310.mp3




Podcast: Breaking the 2-hour marathon barrier, storing data in DNA, and how past civilizations shaped the Amazon

Thu, 02 Mar 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about the science behind breaking the 2-hour marathon barrier, storing data in DNA strands, and a dinosaur’s zigzagging backbones with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. And Carolina Levis joins Alexa Billow to discuss evidence that humans have been domesticating the Amazon’s plants a lot longer than previously thought.   Read Carolina Levis’s research in Science.     Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Carolina Levis; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170303.mp3




Podcast: Cracking the smell code, why dinosaurs had wings before they could fly, and detecting guilty feelings in altruistic gestures

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:15:00 -0500

This week, we chat about why people are nice to each other—does it feel good or are we just avoiding feeling bad—approaches to keeping arsenic out of the food supply, and using artificial intelligence to figure out what a chemical smells like to a human nose with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Stephen Brusatte joins Alexa Billow to discuss why dinosaurs evolved wings and feathers before they ever flew. And in the latest installment of our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Bill Schutt, author of Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History.   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Todd Marshall; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170224.mp3




Podcast: Recognizing the monkey in the mirror, giving people malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and keeping coastal waters clean with seagrass

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about what it means if a monkey can learn to recognize itself in a mirror, injecting people with live malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and insect-inspired wind turbines with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Joleah Lamb joins Alexa Billow to discuss how seagrass can greatly reduce harmful microbes in the ocean—protecting people and corals from disease. Read the research.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: peters99/iStock; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast170217.mp3




Podcast: Saving grizzlies from trains, cheap sun-powered water purification, and a deep look at science-based policymaking

Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about why grizzly bears seem to be dying on Canadian railway tracks, slow-release fertilizers that reduce environmental damage, and cleaning water with the power of the sun on the cheap, with Online News Editor David Grimm. And David Malakoff joins Alexa Billow to discuss a package of stories on the role of science and evidence in policymaking[link TK]. Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: tacky_ch/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast170210.mp3




Podcast: An 80-million-year-old dinosaur protein, sending oxygen to the moon, and competitive forecasting

Thu, 02 Feb 2017 14:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about how the Earth is sending oxygen to the moon, using a GPS data set to hunt for dark matter, and retrieving 80-million year old proteins from dinosaur bones, with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Philip Tetlock joins Alexa Billow to discuss improving our ability to make judgments about the future through forecasting competitions as part of a special section on prediction in this week’s issue of Science. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170203.mp3




Podcast: Bringing back tomato flavor genes, linking pollution and dementia, and when giant otters roamed Earth

Thu, 26 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about 50-kilogram otters that once stalked southern China, using baseball stats to show how jet lag puts players off their game, and a growing link between pollution and dementia, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Also in this week’s show: our very first monthly book segment. In the inaugural segment, Jen Golbeck interviews Helen Pilcher about her new book Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction. Plus Denise Tieman joins Alexa Billow to discuss the genes behind tomato flavor, or lack thereof.   Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Dutodom; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170127.mp3




Podcast: Explaining menopause in killer whales, triggering killer mice, and the role of chromosome number in cancer immunotherapy

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about a surprising reason why killer whales undergo menopause, flipping a kill switch in mice with lasers, and Fukushima residents who measured their own radiation exposure[link tk], with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Stephen Elledge about the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities in tumors and immunotherapy for cancer.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Copyright Kenneth Balcomb Center for Whale Research; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170120.mp3




Podcast: A blood test for concussions, how the hagfish escapes from sharks, and optimizing carbon storage in trees

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:30:00 -0500

This week, we chat about a blood test that could predict recovery time after a concussion, new insights into the bizarre hagfish’s anatomy, and a cheap paper centrifuge based on a toy, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Christian Koerner about why just planting any old tree isn’t the answer to our carbon problem.    Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170113.mp3




Podcast: An ethics conundrum from the Nazi era, baby dinosaur development, and a new test for mad cow disease

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about how long dinosaur eggs take—or took—to hatch, a new survey that confirms the world’s hot spots for lightning, and replenishing endangered species with feral pets with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Megan Gannon about the dilemma presented by tissue samples collected during the Nazi era. And Sarah Crespi discusses a new test for mad cow disease with Kelly Servick.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: NASA/flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170106.mp3




Podcast: Our Breakthrough of the Year, top online stories, and the year in science books

Thu, 22 Dec 2016 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about human evolution in action, 6000-year-old fairy tales, and other top news stories from 2016 with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about this year’s breakthrough, runners-up, breakdowns, and how Science’s predictions from last year help us. In a bonus segment, Science book review editor Valerie Thompson talks about the big science books of 2016 and science books for kids.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Warwick Goble; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/161223_SciencePodcast.mp3




The sound of a monkey talking, cloning horses for sport, and forensic anthropologists help the search for Mexico’s disappeared

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about what talking monkeys would sound like, a surprising virus detected in ancient pottery, and six cloned horses that helped win a big polo match with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Lizzie Wade about what forensic anthropologists can do to help parent groups find missing family members in Mexico.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: (c) Félix Márquez; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161216.mp3




Podcast: Altering time perception, purifying blueberries with plasma, and checking in on ocelot latrines

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about cleaning blueberries with purple plasma, how Tibetan dogs adapted to high-altitude living, and who’s checking ocelot message boards with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Joe Paton about how we know time flies when mice are having fun.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Joseph Sites/USDA ARS; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161209.mp3




Podcast: What ants communicate when kissing, stars birthed from gas, and linking immune strength and social status

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about kissing communication in ants, building immune strength by climbing the social ladder, and a registry for animal research with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Bjorn Emonts about the birth of stars in the Spiderweb Galaxy 10 billion years ago.   Related research on immune function and social hierarchy.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Lauren Brent; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161202.mp3




Podcast: Scientists on the night shift, sucking up greenhouse gases with cement, and repetitive stress in tomb builders

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

 This week, we chat about cement’s shrinking carbon footprint, commuting hazards for ancient Egyptian artisans, and a new bipartisan group opposed to government-funded animal research in the United States with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Sam Kean about the kinds of data that can only be gathered at night as part of the special issue on circadian biology.  Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: roomauction/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161125.mp3




Podcast: The rise of skeletons, species-blurring hybrids, and getting rightfully ditched by a taxi

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week we chat about why it’s hard to get a taxi to nowhere, why bones came onto the scene some 550 million years ago, and how targeting bacteria’s predilection for iron might make better vaccines, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks with news writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the way hybrids muck up the concept of species and turn the evolutionary tree into a tangled web.   Listen to previous podcasts   [Image:  Raul González Alegría; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161118.mp3




Podcast: How farms made dogs love carbs, the role of dumb luck in science, and what your first flu exposure did to you

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—is Bhutan really a quake-free zone, how much of scientific success is due to luck, and what farming changed about dogs and us—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Katelyn Gostic of the University of California, Los Angeles, about how the first flu you came down with—which depends on your birth year—may help predict your susceptibility to new flu strains down the road.   Listen to previous podcasts.     [Image:monkeybusinessimages/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161111.mp3




Podcast: The impact of legal pot on opioid abuse, and a very early look at a fetus’s genome

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, news writer Greg Miller chats with us about how the legalization of marijuana in certain U.S. states is having an impact on the nation’s opioid problem. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Sascha Drewlo about a new method for profiling the DNA of fetuses very early on in pregnancy.   [Image: OpenRangeStock/iStockphoto/Music: Jeffrey Cook] ++   Authors: Sarah Crespi; Alexa Billow


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161104.mp3




Podcast: A close look at a giant moon crater, the long tradition of eating rodents, and building evidence for Planet Nine

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—eating rats in the Neolithic, growing evidence for a gargantuan 9th planet in our solar system, and how to keep just the good parts of a hookworm infection—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Maria Zuber about NASA’s GRAIL spacecraft, which makes incredibly precise measurements of the moon’s gravity. This week’s guest used GRAIL data to explore a giant impact crater and learn more about the effects of giant impacts on the moon and Earth.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Ernest Wright, NASA/GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/sciencepodcast_161028.mp3




Podcast: Science lessons for the next U.S. president, human high altitude adjustments, and the elusive Higgs bison

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—jumping spiders that can hear without ears, long-lasting changes in the human body at high altitudes, and the long hunt for an extinct bison—with Science’s Online News Intern Jessica Boddy. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Deputy News Editor David Malakoff about six science lessons for the next U.S. president.    [Image: Gil Menda at the Hoy Lab; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161021.mp3




Podcast: When we pay attention to plane crashes, releasing modified mosquitoes, and bacteria that live off radiation

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories -- including a new bacterial model for alien life that feeds on cosmic rays, tracking extinct “bear dogs” to Texas, and when we stop caring about plane crashes -- with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to Staff Writer Kelly Servick about her feature story on the releasing modified mosquitoes in Brazil to combat diseases like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Her story is part of a package on mosquito control.  Listen to previous podcasts  [Image: © Alex Wild; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161014.mp3




Podcast: Bumble bee emotions, the purpose of yawning, and new insights into the developing infant brain

Thu, 06 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—including making bees optimistic, comparing yawns across species, and “mind reading” in nonhuman apes—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Mercedes Paredes about her research on the developing infant brain.   Listen to previous podcasts   [Image: mdmiller/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]    


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161007.mp3




Podcast: Why we murder, resurrecting extinct animals, and the latest on the three-parent baby

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Daily news stories Should we bring animals back from extinction, three-parent baby announced, and the roots of human violence, with David Grimm.   From the magazine Our networked world gives us an unprecedented ability to monitor and respond to global happenings. Databases monitoring news stories can provide real-time information about events all over the world -- like conflicts or protests. However, the databases that now exist aren’t up to the task. Alexa Billow talks with Ryan Kennedy about his policy forum that addresses problems with global data collection and interpretation.   [Image: Stocktrek Images, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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Podcast: An atmospheric pacemaker skips a beat, a religious edict that spawned fat chickens, and knocking out the ‘sixth sense’

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:00:00 -0400

A quick change in chickens’ genes as a result of a papal ban on eating four-legged animals, the appeal of tragedy, and genetic defects in the “sixth sense,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine  In February of this year, one of the most regular phenomena in the atmosphere skipped a cycle. Every 22 to 36 months, descending eastward and westward wind jets—high above the equator—switch places. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, or QBO, is normally so regular you can almost set your watch by it, but not this year. Scott Osprey discusses the implications for this change with Alexa Billow.   Read the research.   [Image: ValerijaP/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160923.mp3




Podcast: A burning body experiment, prehistoric hunting dogs, and seeding life on other planets

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on our earliest hunting companions, should we seed exoplanets with life, and finding space storm hot spots with David Grimm.  From the magazine Two years ago, 43 students disappeared from a teacher’s college in Guerrero, Mexico. Months of protests and investigation have not yielded a believable account of what happened to them. The government of Mexico claims that the students were killed by cartel members and burned on an outdoor pyre in a dump outside Cucola. Lizzie Wade has been following this story with a focus on the science of fire investigation. She talks about an investigator in Australia that has burned pig carcasses in an effort to understand these events in Mexico.   [Image: Edgard Garrido/REUTERS/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160916.mp3




Podcast: Double navigation in desert ants, pollution in the brain, and dating deal breakers

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on magnetic waste in the brain, the top deal breakers in online dating, and wolves that are willing to “risk it for the biscuit,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine How do we track where we are going and where we have been? Do you pay attention to your path? Look for landmarks? Leave a scent trail? The problem of navigation has been solved a number of different ways by animals. The desert-dwelling Cataglyphis ant was thought to rely on stride integration, basically counting their steps. But it turns out they have a separate method of keeping track of their whereabouts called “optic flow.” Matthias Wittlinger joins Sarah Crespi to talk about his work with these amazing creatures.   Read the research.   [Image: Rooobert Bayer /Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160909.mp3




Podcast: Ceres’s close-up, how dogs listen, and a new RNA therapy

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on what words dogs know, an RNA therapy for psoriasis, and how Lucy may have fallen from the sky, with Catherine Matacic.  From the magazine In early 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. Over the last year and a half, scientists have studied the mysterious dwarf planet using data collected by Dawn, including detailed images of its surface. Julia Rosen talks with Debra Buczkowski about Ceres’s close-up.  See the full Ceres package.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160902.mp3




Podcast: Quantum dots in consumer electronics and a faceoff with the quiz master

Thu, 25 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Sarah Crespi takes a pop quiz on literal life hacking, spotting poverty from outer space, and the size of the average American vocabulary with Catherine Matacic.   From the magazine You can already buy a quantum dot television, but it’s really just the beginning of the infiltration of quantum dots into our everyday lives. Cherie Kagan is here to talk about her in depth review of the technology published in this week’s issue.   [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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Podcast: How mice mess up reproducibility, new support for an RNA world, and giving cash away wisely

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on a humanmade RNA copier that bolsters ideas about early life on Earth, the downfall of a pre-Columbian empire, and how a bit of cash at the right time can keep you off the streets, with Jessica Boddy.   From the magazine This story combines two things we seem to talk about a lot on the podcast: reproducibility and the microbiome. The big question we’re going to take on is how reproducible are mouse studies when their microbiomes aren’t taken into account? Staff writer Kelly Servick is here to talk about what promises to be a long battle with mouse-dwelling bugs.   [Image: Annedde/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160819_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: 400-year-old sharks, busting a famous scientific hoax, and clinical trials in pets

Thu, 11 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on using pets in clinical trials to test veterinarian drugs, debunking the Piltdown Man once and for all, and deciding just how smart crows can be, with David Grimm.   From the magazine It’s really difficult to figure out how old a free-living animal is. Maybe you can find growth rings in bone or other calcified body parts, but in sharks like the Greenland shark, no such hardened parts exist. Using two different radiocarbon dating approaches, Julius Neilsen and colleagues discovered that the giant Greenland shark may live as long as 400 years.   Read the research.   [Image: James Howard McGregor/Wikimedia Commons/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160812.mp3




Podcast: Pollution hot spots in coastal waters, extreme bees, and diseased dinos

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on bees that live perilously close to the mouth of a volcano, diagnosing arthritis in dinosaur bones, and the evolution of the female orgasm, with David Grimm.  From the magazine Rivers deliver water to the ocean but water is also discharged along the coast in a much more diffuse way. This “submarine groundwater discharge” carries dissolved chemicals out to sea. But the underground nature of these outflows makes them difficult to quantify.  Audrey Sawyer talks with Sarah Crespi about the scale of this discharge and how it affects coastal waters surrounding the United States.  [Image: Hilary Erenler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160805_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: Saving wolves that aren’t really wolves, bird-human partnership, and our oldest common ancestor

Thu, 28 Jul 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Stories on birds that guide people to honey, genes left over from the last universal common ancestor, and what the nose knows about antibiotics, with Devi Shastri.  The Endangered Species Act—a 1973 U.S. law designed to protect animals in the country from extinction—may need a fresh look. The focus on “species” is the problem. This has become especially clear when it comes to wolves—recent genetic information has led to government agencies moving to delist the grey wolf. Robert Wayne helps untangle the wolf family tree and talks us through how a better understanding of wolf genetics may trouble their protected status.  [Image: Claire N. Spottiswoode/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160729_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: An omnipresent antimicrobial, a lichen ménage à trois, and tiny tide-induced tremors

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic.   Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.     [Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160722_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: The science of the apocalypse, and abstract thinking in ducklings

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

What do we know about humanity-ending catastrophes? Julia Rosen talks with Sarah Crespi about various doomsday scenarios and what science can do to save us. Alex Kacelnik talks about getting ducklings to recognize “same” and “different”—a striking finding that reveals conceptual thinking in very early life.  Read the related research. [Image: Antone Martinho/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160715.mp3




Podcast: An exoplanet with three suns, no relief for aching knees, and building better noses

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.  As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.  [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160708.mp3




Podcast: Ending AIDS in South Africa, what makes plants gamble, and genes that turn on after death

Thu, 30 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how plants know when to take risks, confirmation that the ozone layer is on the mend, and genes that come alive after death, with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Science news writer Jon Cohen talks with Julia Rosen about South Africa’s bid to end AIDS.   [Image: J.Seita/Flickr/Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160701.mp3




Podcast: A farewell to Science’s editor-in-chief, how mosquito spit makes us sick, and bears that use human shields

Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:00:00 -0400

Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Siegfried Klaus]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160624.mp3




Podcast: Treating cocaine addiction, mirror molecules in space, and new insight into autism

Thu, 16 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.   Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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Podcast: Scoliosis development, antiracing stripes, and the dawn of the hobbits

Thu, 09 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.   Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


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Podcast: Bionic leaves that make fuel, digging into dog domestication, and wars recorded in coral

Thu, 02 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on new evidence for double dog domestication, what traces of mercury in coral can tell us about local wars, and an update to a classic adaptation story, with online news editor David Grimm.   Brendan Colón talks about a bionic leaf system that captures light and carbon and converts it to several different types of fuels with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Andy Phillips/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160603.mp3




Podcast: The economics of the Uber era, mysterious Neandertal structures, and an octopus boom

Thu, 26 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on underground rings built by Neandertals, worldwide increases in cephalopods and a controversial hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease.   Glen Weyl joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss academics’ role in rising markets that depend on data and networks of people. We’re lucky to live in the age of the match—need a ride, a song, a husband? There’s an app that can match your needs to the object of your desire, with some margin of error. But much of this innovation is happening in the private sector—what is academia doing to contribute?   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Etienne Fabre / SSAC]


Media Files:
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Podcast: Tracking rats in a city slum, the giraffe genome, and watching human evolution in action

Thu, 19 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on finding clues to giraffes’ height in their genomes, evidence that humans are still evolving from massive genome projects, and studies that infect humans with diseases on purpose.  Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an intense study of slum-dwelling rats. [Image: Mauricio Susin]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160520.mp3




Podcast: Rocky remnants of early Earth, plants turned predator, and a new artificial second skin

Thu, 12 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories how the Venus flytrap turned to the meat-eating side, a new clingy polymer film that shrinks up eye bags, and survey results on who pirates scientific papers and why.   Hanika Rizo joins Julia Rosen to discuss evidence that parts of Earth have remained unchanged since the planet formed.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160513.mp3




Podcast: Why animal personalities matter, killer whale sanctuaries, and the key to making fraternal twins

Thu, 05 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on a proposal for an orca sanctuary in the sea, the genes behind conceiving fraternal twins, and why CRISPR won’t be fixing the sick anytime soon.   Elizabeth Pennisi joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss bold birds, shy spiders, and the importance of animal personality.   [Image: Judy Gallagher]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160506.mp3




Podcast: Patent trolls, the earthquake-volcano link, and obesity in China

Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on how earthquakes may trigger volcanic eruptions, growing obesity in China’s children, and turning salty water sweet on the cheap.   Lauren Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the rise of patent trolls in the United States and a proposal for cutting back on their sizable profits.     [Image: © Alberto Garcia/Corbis]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160429.mp3




Podcast: Sizing up a baby dino, jolting dead brains, and dirty mice

Thu, 21 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on a possibledebunking of a popular brain stimulation technique, using “dirty” mice in the lab to simulate the human immune system, and how South American monkeys’ earliest ancestors used rafts to get to Central America.   Kristi Curry Rogers joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss insights into dinosaur growth patterns from the bones of a baby titanosaur found in Madagascar.  Read the research.   [Image: K. Curry Rogers et al./Science]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160422.mp3




Podcast: Tracking Zika, the evolution of sign language, and changing hearts and minds with social science

Thu, 14 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on the evolution of sign language, short conversations than can change minds on social issues, and finding the one-in-a-million people who seem to be resistant to certain genetic diseases—even if they carry genes for them.   Nuno Faria joins host Sarah Crespi to explain how genomic analysis can track Zika’s entry date into Brazil and follow its spread.     [Image: r.a. olea/Flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160415.mp3




Podcast: Spreading cancer, sacrificing humans, and transplanting organs

Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on evidence for the earth being hit by supernovae, record-breaking xenotransplantation, and winning friends and influencing people with human sacrifice.   Staff news writer Jocelyn Kaiser joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how small membrane-bound packets called “exosomes” might pave the way for cancer cells to move into new territory in the body.     [Image: Val Altounian/Science]    


Media Files:
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Podcast: Building a portable drug factory, mapping yeast globally, and watching cliffs crumble

Thu, 31 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on yeasty hitchhikers, sunlight-induced rockfalls, and the tiniest gravity sensor.   Andrea Adamo joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a revolutionary way of making drugs using a portable, on-demand, and reconfigurable drug factory.     [Image: Tom Evans]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160401.mp3




Podcast: Battling it out in the Bronze Age, letting go of orcas, and evolving silicon-based life

Thu, 24 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on SeaWorld’s plans for killer whales, the first steps toward silicon-based life, and the ripple effect of old dads on multiple generations.   Andrew Curry joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a grisly find in Northern Germany that suggests Bronze Age northern Europe was more organized and more violent than thought.   [Image: ANDESAMT FÜR KULTUR UND DENKMALPFLEGE MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN/LANDESARCHÄOLOGIE/S. SUHR ]


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Podcast: The latest news from Pluto, a rock-eating fungus, and tracking storm damage with Twitter

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

News intern Nala Rogers shares stories on mineral-mining microbes, mapping hurricane damage using social media, and the big takeaway from the latest human-versus-computer match up.   Hal Weaver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss five papers from New Horizons Pluto flyby, including a special focus on Pluto’s smaller moons.   [Image: Saran_Poroong/iStockphoto]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160318.mp3




Podcast: Nuclear forensics, honesty in a sea of lies, and how sliced meat drove human evolution

Thu, 10 Mar 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on the influence of governmental corruption on the honesty of individuals, what happened when our ancestors cut back on the amount of time spent chewing food, and how plants use sand to grind herbivores‘ gears.   Science’s International News Editor Rich Stone joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his forensics story on how to track down the culprits after a nuclear detonation.   [Image: Miroslav Boskov]


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Podcast: Glowing robot skin, zombie frogs, and viral fossils in our DNA

Thu, 03 Mar 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on zombification by a frog-killing fungus, relating the cosmological constant to life in the universe, and ancient viral genes that protect us from illness.   Chris Larson joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new type of robot skin that can stretch and glow.   [Image: Jungbae Park]


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Podcast: A recipe for clean and tasty drinking water, a gauge on rapidly rising seas, and fake flowers that can fool the most discerning insects

Thu, 25 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on what we can learn from 6million years of climate data, how to make lifelike orchids with 3D printing, and crowdsourced gender bias on eBay.   Fernando Rosario-Ortiz joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how approaches to water purification differ between countries.   [Image: Eric Hunt/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0] 0]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160226.mp3




Podcast: Combatting malnutrition with gut microbes, fighting art forgers with science, and killing cancer with gold

Thu, 18 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on how our abilities shape our minds, killing cancer cells with gold nanoparticles, and catching art forgery with cat hair.   Laura Blanton joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how nourishing our gut microbes may prevent malnutrition. Read the related research in Science.   [Image: D. S. Wagner et al., Biomaterials, 31 (2010)]   Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm


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Podcast: The effects of Neandertal DNA on health, squishing bugs for science, and sleepy confessions

Thu, 11 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on confessions extracted from sleepy people, malaria hiding out in deer, and making squishable bots based on cockroaches.   Corinne Simonti joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss whether Neandertal DNA in the human genome is helping or hurting. Read the related research in Science.   [Image: Tom Libby, Kaushik Jayaram and Pauline Jennings. Courtesy of PolyPEDAL Lab UC Berkeley.]


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Podcast: Taking race out of genetics, a cellular cleanse for longer life, and smart sweatbands

Thu, 04 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on killing cells to lengthen life, getting mom’s microbes after a C-section, and an advanced fitness tracker that sits on the wrist and sips sweat.   Michael Yudell joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an initiative to replace race in genetics with more biologically meaningful terms, and Lena Wilfert talks about drivers of the global spread of the bee-killing deformed wing virus.   [Image: Vipin Baliga/(CC BY 2.0)]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160205.mp3




Podcast: Babylonian astronomers, doubly domesticated cats, and outrunning a T. Rex

Thu, 28 Jan 2016 03:30:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on 66-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex tracks, a signature of human consciousness, and a second try at domesticating cats. Mathieu Ossendrijver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss newly translated Babylonian tablets that extend the roots of calculus all the way back to between 350 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E. Read the related research in Science.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160129.mp3




Podcast: A planet beyond Pluto, the bugs in your home, and the link between marijuana and IQ

Thu, 21 Jan 2016 14:45:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on studying marijuana use in teenage twins, building a better maze for psychological experiments, and a close inspection of the bugs in our homes. Science News Writer Eric Hand joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the potential for a ninth planet in the solar system that circles the sun just once every 15,000 years.  [Image: Gilles San Martin/CC BY-SA 2.0]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160122.mp3




Podcast: Wounded mammoths, brave birds, bright bulbs, and more

Thu, 14 Jan 2016 14:00:00 -0500

In this week’s podcast, David Grimm talks about brave birds, building a brighter light bulb, and changing our voice to influence our emotions. Plus, Ann Gibbons discusses the implications of a butchered 45,000-year-old mammoth found in the Siberian arctic for human migration. Read the related research in Science. [IMG: Dmitry Bogdanov]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160115.mp3




Podcast: Dancing dinosaurs, naked black holes, and more

Fri, 08 Jan 2016 11:45:00 -0500

What stripped an unusual black hole of its stars? Can a bipolar drug change ant behavior? And did dinosaurs dance to woo mates? Science's Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science's Multimedia Producer Sarah Crespi. Plus,Science's Emily Underwood wades into the muddled world of migraine research, and Jessica Metcalf talks about using modern microbial means to track mammalian decomposition.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160108.mp3




The Science breakthrough of the year, readers' choice, and the top news from 2015.

Thu, 17 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Robert Coontz discusses Science's 2015 Breakthrough of the Year and runners-up, from visions of Pluto to the discovery of a previously unknown human species. Online news editor David Grimm reviews the top news stories of the past year with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard.


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Artificial intelligence programs that learn concepts based on just a few examples and a daily news roundup

Thu, 10 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Brenden Lake discusses a new computational model that rivals the human ability to learn new concepts based on just a single example; David Grimm talks about attracting cockroaches, searching for habitable planets, and looking to street dogs to learn about domestication. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Rodrigo Basaure CC BY 2.0, via flickr]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151211.mp3




How our gut microbiota change as we age and a daily news roundup

Thu, 03 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Paul O'Toole discusses what happens to our gut microbes as we age; David Grimm talks about competent grandmas, our tilted moon, and gender in the brain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Dhinakaran Gajavarathan CC BY 2.0, via flickr]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151204.mp3




Can "big data" from mobile phones pinpoint pockets of poverty? And a news roundup

Thu, 26 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Joshua Blumenstock discusses patterns of mobile phone use as a source of "big data" about wealth and poverty in developing countries; David Grimm talks about gene drives, helpful parasites, and electric roses. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: A.A. JAMES]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151127.mp3




Bioengineering functional vocal cords and a daily news roundup

Thu, 19 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Jennifer Long explains how scientists have engineered human vocal cords; Catherine Matacic talks about vanquishing a deadly amphibian fungus, pigeons that spot cancer, and more. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Jaime Bosch MNCN-CSIC]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151120.mp3




The consequences of mass extinction and a daily news roundup

Thu, 12 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Lauren Sallan discusses the consequences of a mass extinction event 359 million years ago on vertebrate body size; David Grimm talks about grandma's immune system, gambling on studies, and killer genes. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Robert Nicholls]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151113.mp3




The evolution of Mars' atmosphere and a daily news roundup

Thu, 05 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Bruce Jakosky discusses where Mars' once-thick, CO2-ish atmosphere went and the first data from the MAVEN mission to study the Red Planet; David Grimm talks about worm allergies, fake fingerprints, and toilets for all. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NASA]


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http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151106.mp3




The origins of biodiversity in the Amazon and a daily news roundup

Thu, 29 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Lizzie Wade discusses whether the amazing biodiversity of the Amazon Basin was the result of massive flooding, or the uplift of the Andes mountain range. David Grimm talks about microbes aboard the International Space Station, the fate of juvenile giant ground sloths during the Pleistocene, and singing classes as social glue. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: ©Jason Houston]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151030.mp3




The neuroscience of reversing blindness and a daily news roundup

Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Rhitu Chatterjee discusses Project Prakash and the neuroscience behind reversing blindness in children, teenagers, and adults in rural India; David Grimm talks about where dogs came from, when life first evolved, and holes in the brain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Francois de Halleux CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151023.mp3




Pluto's mysteries revealed and a daily news roundup

Thu, 15 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Alan Stern discusses the first scientific results from the New Horizons July 14 flyby of Pluto, which revealed details about the dwarf planet's geology, surface composition, and atmosphere; Catherine Matacic talks about dino temps, Paleo-sleeping, and editing pig organs. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151016.mp3




Can math apps benefit kids? And a daily news roundup

Thu, 08 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Talia Berkowitz discusses the use of a math app at home to boost math achievement at school, Catherine Matacic talks about the fate of animals near Chernobyl, a potential kitty contraceptive, and where spiders got their knees. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151009.mp3




Safer jet fuels and a daily news roundup

Thu, 01 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Julia Kornfield discusses the design of safer jet fuel additives using polymer theory to control misting and prevent fires, David Grimm talks about building a better sunscreen, cultures that don't count past four, and does empathy mean feeling literal pain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Eduard Marmet/CC BY-SA-3.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151002.mp3




3-parent gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and a news roundup

Thu, 24 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Kimberly Dunham-Snary discusses the long-term health considerations of gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and David Grimm talks about the smell of death, Mercury crashing, and animal IQ. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Ben Gracewood CC BY-NC 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150925.mp3




How future elites view self-interest and equality and a news roundup

Thu, 17 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Daniel Markovits discusses the preferences for fairness and equiality among potential future US leaders and David Grimm talks about finding fluorine's origins, persistant lone wolves, and the domestiction of the chicken. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Philip Pikart/CC BY-SA 4.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150918.mp3




Genes and the human microbiome and a news roundup

Thu, 10 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Seth Bordenstein discusses how our genes affect the composition of our microbiome, influencing our health, and David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about the origins of the Basque language, the benefits of being raised in a barn, and how some flying ants lost their wings. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Decaseconds/CC BY-NC 2.0, via flickr


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150911.mp3




The state of science in Iran and a news roundup

Thu, 03 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Rich Stone discusses science in Iran in the face of economic sanctions. David Grimm brings stories on sleep deprivation and the common cold, plastic in birds, and counting trees. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Credit: Alessandro Marongiu / Demotix /Corbis]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150904.mp3




Moralizing gods, scientific reproducibility, and a daily news roundup

Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Brian Nosek discusses the reproducibility of science, Lizzie Wade delves into the origin of religions with moralizing gods. David Grimm talks about debunking the young Earth, a universal flu vaccine, and short, sweet paper titles. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: DIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150828.mp3