Subscribe: Science Magazine Podcast
http://www.sciencemag.org/rss/podcast.xml
Preview: Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast



Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.



 



Drug use in the ancient world, and what will happen to plants as carbon dioxide levels increase

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 14:15:00 -0400

Armed with new data, archaeologists are revealing that mind-altering drugs were present at the dawn of the first complex societies some 5000 years ago in the ancient Middle East. Contributing writer Andrew Lawler joins Sarah Crespi to discuss the evidence for these drugs and how they might have impacted early societies and beliefs. Sarah also interviews Sarah Hobbie of the University of Minnesota about the fate of plants under climate change. Will all that extra carbon dioxide in the air be good for certain types of flora? A 20-year long study published this week in Science suggests theoretical predictions have been off the mark. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Public domain Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180420.mp3




How DNA is revealing Latin America’s lost histories, and how to make a molecule from just two atoms

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 14:00:00 -0400

Geneticists and anthropologists studying historical records and modern-day genomes are finding traces of previously unknown migrants to Latin America in the 16th and 17th centuries, when Asians, Africans, and Europeans first met indigenous Latin Americans. Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Lizzie Wade about what she learned on the topic at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists’s annual meeting in Austin. Sarah also interviews Kang-Keun Ni about her research using optical tweezers to bring two atoms—one cesium and one sodium—together into a single molecule. Such precise control of molecule formation is allowing new observations of these basic processes and is opening the door to creating new molecules for quantum computing. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Juan Fernando Ibarra; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180413.mp3




Legendary Viking crystals, and how to put an octopus to sleep

Thu, 05 Apr 2018 14:00:00 -0400

A millennium ago, Viking navigators may have used crystals known as “sunstones” to navigate between Norway and Greenland. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor David Grimm about how one might use a crystal to figure out where they are. Sarah also interviews freelancer Danna Staaf about her piece on sedating cephalopods. Until recently, researchers working with octopuses and squids faced the dilemma of not knowing whether the animals were truly sedated or whether only their ability to respond had been suppressed. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image:  Nicholas Roerich, Guests from Overseas; Music: Jeffrey Cook]   


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180406.mp3




Chimpanzee retirement gains momentum, and x-ray ‘ghost images’ could cut radiation doses

Thu, 29 Mar 2018 14:45:00 -0400

Two of the world’s most famous research chimpanzees have finally retired. Hercules and Leo arrived at a chimp sanctuary in Georgia last week. Sarah Crespi checks in with Online News Editor David Grimm on the increasing momentum for research chimp retirement since the primates were labeled endangered species in 2015. Sarah also interviews freelancer Sophia Chen about her piece on x-ray ghost imaging—a technique that may lead to safer medical imaging done with cheap, single-pixel cameras. David Malakoff joins Sarah to talk about the big boost in U.S. science funding signed into law over the weekend. Finally, Jen Golbeck interviews author Stephanie Elizabeth Mohr on her book First in Fly: Drosophila Research and Biological Discovery for our monthly books segment. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Crystal Alba/Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180330.mp3




A possible cause for severe morning sickness, and linking mouse moms’ caretaking to brain changes in baby mice

Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:00:00 -0400

Researchers are converging on which genes are linked to morning sickness—the nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy—and the more severe form: hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). And once we know what those genes are—can we help pregnant women feel better? News intern Roni Dengler joins Sarah Crespi to talk about a new study that suggests a protein already flagged for its role in cancer-related nausea may also be behind HG. In a second segment, Tracy Bedrosian of the Neurotechnology Innovations Translator talks about how the amount of time spent being licked by mom might be linked to changes in the genetic code of hippocampal neurons in mice pups. Could these types of genomic changes be a new type of plasticity in the brain? This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Jacob Bøtter/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180323.mp3




How humans survived an ancient volcanic winter and how disgust shapes ecosystems

Thu, 15 Mar 2018 14:15:00 -0400

When Indonesia’s Mount Toba blew its top some 74,000 years ago, an apocalyptic scenario ensued: Tons of ash and debris entered the atmosphere, coating the planet in ash for 2 weeks straight and sending global temperatures plummeting. Despite the worldwide destruction, humans survived. Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about how life after Toba was even possible—were humans decimated, or did they rally in the face of a suddenly extra hostile planet? Next, Julia Buck of the University of California, Santa Barbara, joins Sarah to discuss her Science commentary piece on landscapes of disgust. You may have heard of a landscape of fear—how a predator can influence an ecosystem not just by eating its prey, but also by introducing fear into the system, changing the behavior of many organisms. Buck and colleagues write about how disgust can operate in a similar way: Animals protect themselves from parasites and infection by avoiding disgusting things such as dead animals of the same species or those with disease. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Emma Forsber/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180316.mp3




Animals that don’t need people to be domesticated; the astonishing spread of false news; and links between gender, sexual orientation, and speech

Thu, 08 Mar 2018 14:30:00 -0500

Did people domesticate animals? Or did they domesticate themselves? Online News Editor David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about a recent study that looked at self-domesticating mice. If they could go it alone, could cats or dogs have done the same in the distant past? Next, Sinan Aral of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge joins Sarah to discuss his work on true and false rumor cascades across all of Twitter, since its inception. He finds that false news travels further, deeper, and faster than true news, regardless of the source of the tweet, the kind of news it was, or whether bots were involved. In a bonus segment recording during a live podcasting event at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Sarah first speaks with Ben Munson of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis about markers of gender and sexual orientation in spoken language and then Adrienne Hancock of The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., talks about using what we know about gender and communication to help transgender women change their speech and communication style. Live recordings sessions at the AAAS meeting were supported by funds from the European Commission. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Rudolf Jakkel (CC0); Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180309.mp3




A new dark matter signal from the early universe, massive family trees, and how we might respond to alien contact

Thu, 01 Mar 2018 15:15:00 -0500

For some time after the big bang there were no stars. Researchers are now looking at cosmic dawn—the time when stars first popped into being—and are seeing hints of dark matter’s influence on supercold hydrogen clouds. News Writer Adrian Cho talks with Sarah Crespi about how this observation was made and what it means for our understanding of dark matter. Sarah also interviews Joanna Kaplanis of the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., about constructing enormous family trees based on an online social genealogy platform. What can we learn from the biggest family tree ever built—with 13 million members spanning 11 generations? In a bonus segment recording during a live podcasting event at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Sarah talks with Michael Varnum of Arizona State University in Tempe about what people think they will do if humanity comes into contact with aliens that just happen to be microbes. Live recordings sessions at the AAAS meeting were supported by funds from the European Commission. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Kilo-Degree Survey Collaboration/H. Hildebrandt & B. Giblin/ESO; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180302.mp3




Neandertals that made art, live news from the AAAS Annual Meeting, and the emotional experience of being a scientist

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 14:15:00 -0500

We talk about the techniques of painting sleuths, how to combat alternative facts or “fake news,” and using audio signposts to keep birds from flying into buildings. For this segment, David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with host Sarah Crespi as part of a live podcast event from the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin. Sarah also interviews Science News Editor Tim Appenzeller about Neandertal art. The unexpected age of some European cave paintings is causing experts to rethink the mental capabilities of our extinct cousins. For the monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck interviews with William Glassley about his book, A Wilder Time: Notes from a Geologist at the Edge of the Greenland Ice. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Marcus Trienke/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180223.mp3




Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:15:00 -0500

Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression. Sarah also interviews David Merritt Johns of Columbia University about the so-called sugar conspiracy. Historical evidence suggests, despite recent media reports, it is unlikely that “big sugar” influenced U.S. nutrition policy and led to the low-fat diet fad of the ’80s and ’90s. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Lauri Andler (Phantom); Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180216.mp3




Happy lab animals may make better research subjects, and understanding the chemistry of the indoor environment

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 14:00:00 -0500

Would happy lab animals—rats, mice, even zebrafish—make for better experiments? David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the potential of treating lab animals more like us and making them more useful for science at the same time. Sarah also interviews Jon Abbatt of the University of Toronto in Canada about indoor chemistry. What is going on in the air inside buildings—how different is it from the outside? Researchers are bringing together the tools of outdoor chemistry and building sciences to understand what is happening in the air and on surfaces inside—where some of us spend 90% of our time. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Austin Thomason/Michigan Photography; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180209.mp3




Following 1000 people for decades to learn about the interplay of health, environment, and temperament, and investigating why naked mole rats don’t seem to age

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 14:15:00 -0500

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the chance a naked mole rat could die at any one moment. Surprisingly, the probability a naked mole rat will die does not go up as it gets older. Researchers are looking at the biology of these fascinating animals for clues to their seeming lack of aging. Sarah also interviews freelancer Douglas Starr about his feature story on the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study—a comprehensive study of the lives of all the babies born in 1 year in a New Zealand hospital. Starr talks about the many insights that have come out of this work—including new understandings of criminality, drug addiction, and mental illness—and the research to be done in the future as the 1000-person cohort begins to enter its fifth decade. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Tim Evanson/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180202.mp3




The dangers of dismantling a geoengineered sun shield and the importance of genes we don’t inherit

Thu, 25 Jan 2018 14:15:00 -0500

Catherine Matacic—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about how geoengineering could reduce the harshest impacts of climate change, but make them even worse if it were ever turned off. Sarah also interviews Augustine Kong of the Big Data Institute at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom about his Science paper on the role of noninherited “nurturing genes.” For example, educational attainment has a genetic component that may or may not be inherited. But having a parent with a predisposition for attainment still influences the child—even if those genes aren’t passed down. This shift to thinking about other people (and their genes) as the environment we live in complicates the age-old debate on nature versus nurture. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Collection of Dr. Pablo Clemente-Colon, Chief Scientist National Ice Center; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180126.mp3




Unearthed letters reveal changes in Fields Medal awards, and predicting crime with computers is no easy feat

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:00:00 -0500

Freelance science writer Michael Price talks with Sarah Crespi about recently revealed deliberations for a coveted mathematics prize: the Fields Medal. Unearthed letters suggest early award committees favored promise and youth over star power. Sarah also interviews Julia Dressel about her Science Advances paper on predicting recidivism—the likelihood that a criminal defendant will commit another crime. It turns out computers aren’t better than people at these types of predictions, in fact—both are correct only about 65% of the time.   Jen Golbeck interviews Paul Shapiro about his book, Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World, in our monthly books segment.   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Greg Chiasson/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180119.mp3




Salad-eating sharks, and what happens after quantum computing achieves quantum supremacy

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:00:00 -0500

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about two underwater finds: the first sharks shown to survive off of seagrass and what fossilized barnacles reveal about ancient whale migrations. Sarah also interviews Staff Writer Adrian Cho about what happens after quantum computing achieves quantum supremacy—the threshold where a quantum computer’s abilities outstrip nonquantum machines. Just how useful will these machines be and what kinds of scientific problems might they tackle? Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: Aleria Jensen, NOAA/NMFS/AKFSC; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180112.mp3




Who visits raccoon latrines, and boosting cancer therapy with gut microbes

Thu, 04 Jan 2018 14:15:00 -0500

David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about a long-term project monitoring raccoon latrines in California. What influence do these wild bathrooms have on the ecosystem? Sarah also interviews Christian Jobin of the University of Florida in Gainesville about his Perspective on three papers linking the success of cancer immunotherapy with microbes in the gut—it turns out which bacteria live in a cancer patient’s intestines can predict their response to this cutting-edge cancer treatment. Read the related papers: Routy et al., Gut microbiome influences efficacy of PD-1–based immunotherapy against epithelial tumors, Science 2018 Gopalakrishnan et al., Gut microbiome modulates response to anti–PD-1 immunotherapy in melanoma patients, Science 2018 Matson et al., The commensal microbiome is associated with anti–PD-1 efficacy in metastatic melanoma patients, Science 2018 aan4236 Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: cuatrok77/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_180105.mp3




Science’s Breakthrough of the Year, our best online news, and science books for your shopping list

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 14:00:00 -0500

Dave Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about a few of this year’s top stories from our online news site, like ones on a major error in the monarch butterfly biological record and using massive balloons to build tunnels, and why they were chosen. Hint: It’s not just the stats. Sarah also interviews Staff Writer Adrian Cho about the 2017 Breakthrough of the Year. Adrian talks about why Science gave the nod to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory team for a second year in a row—for the detection of a pair of merging neutron stars. Jen Golbeck is also back for the last book review segment of the year. She talks with Sarah about her first year on the show, her favorite books, what we should have covered, and some suggestions for books as gifts. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: f99aq8ove/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171222.mp3




Putting the breaks on driverless cars, and dolphins that can muffle their ears

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 14:30:00 -0500

Whales and dolphins have incredibly sensitive hearing and are known to be harmed by loud underwater noises. David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about new research on captive cetaceans suggesting that some species can naturally muffle such sounds—perhaps opening a way to protect these marine mammals in the wild. Sarah also interviews Staff Writer Jeffrey Mervis about his story on the future of autonomous cars. Will they really reduce traffic and make our lives easier? What does the science say?    Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Laura Wolf/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171215.mp3




Folding DNA into teddy bears and getting creative about gun violence research

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 14:30:00 -0500

This week, three papers came out describing new approaches to folding DNA into large complex shapes—20 times bigger than previous DNA sculptures. Staff Writer Bob Service talks with Sarah Crespi about building microscopic teddy bears, doughnuts, and more from genetic material, and using these techniques to push forward fields from materials science to drug delivery. Sarah also interviews Philip Cook of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, about his Policy Forum on gun regulation research. It’s long been hard to collect data on gun violence in the United States, and Cook talks about how some researchers are getting funding and hard data. He also discusses some strong early results on open-carry laws and links between gun control and intimate partner homicide. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: : K. WAGENBAUER ET AL., NATURE, VOL. 551, 2017; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171208.mp3




Debunking yeti DNA, and the incredibly strong arms of prehistoric female farmers

Thu, 30 Nov 2017 14:15:00 -0500

The abominable snowman, the yeti, bigfoot, and sasquatch—these long-lived myths of giant, hairy hominids depend on dropping elusive clues to stay in the popular imagination—a blurry photo here, a big footprint there—but what happens when scientists try to pin that evidence down? Online News Editor David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about the latest attempts to verify the yeti’s existence using DNA analysis of bones and hair and how this research has led to more than the debunking of a mythic creature. Sarah also interviews Alison Macintosh of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom about her investigation of bone, muscle, and behavior in prehistory female farmers—what can a new database of modern women’s bones—athletes and regular folks—tell us about the labor of women as humans took up farming?   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Didier Descouens/CC BY SA 3.0; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171201.mp3




The world’s first dog pictures, and looking at the planet from a quantum perspective

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 14:00:00 -0500

About 8000 years ago, people were drawing dogs with leashes, according to a series of newly described stone carvings from Saudi Arabia. Online News Editor David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about reporting on this story and what it says about the history of dog domestication. Sarah also interviews physicist Brad Marston of Brown University on surprising findings that bring together planetary science and quantum physics. It turns out that Earth’s rotation and the presence of oceans and atmosphere on its surface mean it can be described as a “topological insulator”—a term usually reserved for quantum phenomena. Insights from the study of these effects at the quantum level may help us understand weather and currents at the planetary level—including insights into climate change and exoplanets. Listen to previous podcasts.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171124.mp3




Preventing psychosis and the evolution—or not—of written language

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 14:30:00 -0500

How has written language changed over time? Do the way we read and the way our eyes work influence how scripts look? This week we hear a story on changes in legibility in written texts with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi also interviews Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel on her story about detecting signs of psychosis in kids and teens, recruiting at-risk individuals for trials, and searching for anything that can stop the progression.    Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Procsilas Moscas/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171117.mp3




Randomizing the news for science, transplanting genetically engineered skin, and the ethics of experimental brain implants

Thu, 09 Nov 2017 14:00:00 -0500

This week we hear stories on what to do with experimental brain implants after a study is over, how gene therapy gave a second skin to a boy with a rare epidermal disease, and how bone markings thought to be evidence for early hominid tool use may have been crocodile bites instead, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi interviews Gary King about his new experiment to bring fresh data to the age-old question of how the news media influences the public. Are journalists setting the agenda or following the crowd? How can you know if a news story makes a ripple in a sea of online information? In a powerful study, King’s group was able to publish randomized stories on 48 small and medium sized news sites in the United States and then track the results.  Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Chad Sparkes/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171110.mp3




How Earth’s rotation could predict giant quakes, gene therapy’s new hope, and how carbon monoxide helps deep-diving seals

Thu, 02 Nov 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on how the sloshing of Earth’s core may spike major earthquakes, carbon monoxide’s role in keeping deep diving elephant seals oxygenated, and a festival celebrating heavily researched yet completely nonsensical theories with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi interviews staff writer Jocelyn Kaiser about the status of gene therapy, including a newly tested gene-delivering virus that may give scientists a new way to treat devastating spinal and brain diseases. Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Robert Schwemmer, CINMS, NOAA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171103.mp3




Building conscious machines, tracing asteroid origins, and how the world’s oldest forests grew

Thu, 26 Oct 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on sunlight pushing Mars’s flock of asteroids around, approximately 400-million-year-old trees that grew by splitting their guts, and why fighting poverty might also mean worsening climate change with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks with cognitive neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene of the Collège de France in Paris about consciousness—what is it and can machines have it? For our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck reviews astronaut Scott Kelly’s book Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA/Goddard; Music: Jeffrey Cook]​


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171027.mp3




LIGO spots merging neutron stars, scholarly questions about a new Bible museum, and why wolves are better team players than dogs

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week we hear stories about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s latest hit, why wolves are better team players than dogs, and volcanic eruptions that may have triggered riots in ancient Egypt with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi interviews contributing correspondent Lizzie Wade about the soon-to-open Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. Can it recover from early accusations of forgeries and illicitly obtained artifacts? Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Public Domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171020.mp3




Evolution of skin color, taming rice thrice, and peering into baby brains

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 16:30:00 -0400

This week we hear stories about a new brain imaging technique for newborns, recently uncovered evidence on rice domestication on three continents, and why Canada geese might be migrating into cities, with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Sarah Crespi interviews Sarah Tishkoff of the University of Pennsylvania about the age and diversity of genes related to skin pigment in African genomes.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Danny Chapman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171013.mp3




Putting rescue robots to the test, an ancient Scottish village buried in sand, and why costly drugs may have more side effects

Thu, 05 Oct 2017 16:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories about putting rescue bots to the test after the Mexico earthquake, why a Scottish village was buried in sand during the Little Ice Age, and efforts by the U.S. military to predict posttraumatic stress disorder with Online News Editor David Grimm. Andrew Wagner interviews Alexandra Tinnermann of the University Medical Center of Hamburg, Germany, about the nocebo effect. Unlike the placebo effect, in which you get positive side effects with no treatment, in the nocebo effect you get negative side effects with no treatment. It turns out both nocebo and placebo effects get stronger with a drug perceived as more expensive. Read the research. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_171006.mp3




Furiously beating bat hearts, giant migrating wombats, and puzzling out preprint publishing

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 16:30:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on how a bat varies its heart rate to avoid starving, giant wombatlike creatures that once migrated across Australia, and the downsides of bedbugs’ preference for dirty laundry with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks Jocelyn Kaiser about her guide to preprint servers for biologists—what they are, how they are used, and why some people are worried about preprint publishing’s rising popularity. For our monthly book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to author Sandra Postel about her book, Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: tap10/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170929.mp3




Cosmic rays from beyond our galaxy, sleeping jellyfish, and counting a language’s words for colors

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on animal hoarding, how different languages have different numbers of colors, and how to tell a wakeful jellyfish from a sleeping one with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic, Brice Russ, and Sarah Crespi.   Andrew Wagner talks to Karl-Heinz Kampert about a long-term study of the cosmic rays blasting our planet. After analyzing 30,000 high-energy rays, it turns out some are coming from outside the Milky Way.   Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Doug Letterman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170922.mp3




Cargo-sorting molecular robots, humans as the ultimate fire starters, and molecular modeling with quantum computers

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on the gut microbiome’s involvement in multiple sclerosis, how wildfires start—hint: It’s almost always people—and a new record in quantum computing with Online News Editor David Grimm. Andrew Wagner talks to Lulu Qian about DNA-based robots that can carry and sort cargo. Sarah Crespi goes behind the scenes with Science’s Photography Managing Editor Bill Douthitt to learn about snapping this week’s cover photo of the world’s smallest neutrino detector. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Curtis Perry/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170915.mp3




Taking climate science to court, sailing with cylinders, and solar cooling

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on smooth sailing with giant, silolike sails, a midsized black hole that may be hiding out in the Milky Way, and new water-cooling solar panels that could cut air conditioning costs with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Sabrina McCormick about climate science in the U.S. courts and the growing role of the judiciary in climate science policy. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170908.mp3




Mysteriously male crocodiles, the future of negotiating AIs, and atomic bonding between the United States and China

Thu, 31 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on involving more AIs in negotiations, tiny algae that might be responsible for killing some (not all) dinosaurs, and a chemical intended to make farm fish grow faster that may be also be causing one area’s crocodile population to skew male—with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Sarah Crespi talks to Rich Stone about being on the scene for a joint U.S.-China mission to remove bomb-grade fuel from a nuclear reactor in Ghana.   Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image:Chad Sparkes; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170901.mp3




What hunter-gatherer gut microbiomes have that we don’t, and breaking the emoji code

Thu, 24 Aug 2017 15:45:00 -0400

Sarah Crespi talks to Sam Smits about how our microbial passengers differ from one culture to the next—are we losing diversity and the ability to fight chronic disease? For our books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Vyvyan Evans about his book The Emoji Code: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Woodlouse/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170825.mp3




A jump in rates of knee arthritis, a brief history of eclipse science, and bands and beats in the atmosphere of brown dwarfs

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on a big jump in U.S. rates of knee arthritis, some science hits and misses from past eclipses, and the link between a recently discovered thousand-year-old Viking fortress and your Bluetooth earbuds with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Daniel Apai about a long-term study of brown dwarfs and what patterns in the atmospheres of these not-quite-stars, not-quite-planets can tell us. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170818.mp3




Coddled puppies don’t do as well in school, some trees make their own rain, and the Americas were probably first populated by ancient mariners

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on new satellite measurements that suggest the Amazon makes its own rain for part of the year, puppies raised with less smothering moms do better in guide dog school, and what DNA can tell us about ancient Greeks’ near mythical origins with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Lizzie Wade about coastal and underwater evidence of a watery route for the Americas’ first people. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Lizzie Wade; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170811.mp3




The biology of color, a database of industrial espionage, and a link between prions and diabetes

Thu, 03 Aug 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease in chimps, a potential new pathway to diabetes—through prions—and what a database of industrial espionage says about the economics of spying with Online News Editors David Grimm and Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi talks to Innes Cuthill about how the biology of color intersects with behavior, development, and vision. And Mary Soon Lee joins to share some of her chemistry haiku—one poem for each element in the periodic table. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Zoltan Tasi/Unsplash; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170804.mp3




DNA and proteins from ancient books, music made from data, and the keys to poverty traps

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we hear stories on turning data sets into symphonies for business and pleasure, why so much of the world is stuck in the poverty trap, and calls for stiffening statistical significance with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to news writer Ann Gibbons about the biology of ancient books—what can we learn from DNA, proteins, and book worm trails about a book, its scribes, and its readers? Listen to previous podcasts. [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170728.mp3




Paying cash for carbon, making dogs friendly, and destroying all life on Earth

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the genes that may make dogs friendly, why midsized animals are the fastest, and what it would take to destroy all the life on our planet with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Seema Jayachandran about paying cash to Ugandan farmers to not cut down trees—does it reduce deforestation in the long term? Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Kerrick/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170721.mp3




Still-living dinosaurs, the world’s first enzymes, and thwarting early adopters in tech

Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week, we have stories on how ultraviolet rays may have jump-started the first enzymes on Earth, a new fossil find that helps date how quickly birds diversified after the extinction of all the other dinosaurs, and a drug that may help reverse the effects of traumatic brain injury on memory with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic and special guest Carolyn Gramling. Sarah Crespi talks to Christian Catalini about an experiment in which some early adopters were denied access to new technology and what it means for the dissemination of that tech. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Michael Wuensch/Creative Commons Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_20170714.mp3




Odorless calories for weight loss, building artificial intelligence researchers can trust, and can oily birds fly?

Thu, 06 Jul 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the twisty tree of human ancestry, why mice shed weight when they can’t smell, and the damaging effects of even a small amount of oil on a bird’s feathers—with Online News Editor David Grimm.  Sarah Crespi talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about a special section on how artificial intelligence is changing the way we do science.  Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: © 2012 CERN, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ALICE COLLABORATION; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_2017_07_07.mp3




A Stone Age skull cult, rogue Parkinson’s proteins in the gut, and controversial pesticides linked to bee deaths

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 16:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on what the rogue Parkinson’s protein is doing in the gut, how chimps outmuscle humans, and evidence for an ancient skull cult with Online News Editor David Grimm. Jen Golbeck is back with this month’s book segment. She interviews Alan Alda about his new book on science communication: If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? Sarah Crespi talks to Jeremy Kerr about two huge studies that take a nuanced looked at the relationship between pesticides and bees. Read the research in Science: Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees, B.A. Woodcock et al. Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops, Tsvetkov et al. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: webted/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170630.mp3




Why eggs have such weird shapes, doubly domesticated cats, and science balloons on the rise

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on the new capabilities of science balloons, connections between deforestation and drug trafficking in Central America, and new insights into the role ancient Egypt had in taming cats with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Mary Caswell Stoddard about why bird eggs come in so many shapes and sizes. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image:; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170623.mp3




Slowly retiring chimps, tanning at the cellular level, and plumbing magma’s secrets

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week we have stories on why it’s taking so long for research chimps to retire, boosting melanin for a sun-free tan, and tracking a mouse trail to find liars online with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to Allison Rubin about what we can learn from zircon crystals outside of a volcano about how long hot magma hangs out under a volcano. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170616.mp3




How to weigh a star—with a little help from Einstein, toxic ‘selfish genes,’ and the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week we have stories on what body cams reveal about interactions between black drivers and U.S. police officers, the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils, and how modern astronomers measured the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein—with Online News Intern Ryan Cross. Sarah Crespi talks to Eyal Ben-David about a pair of selfish genes—one toxin and one antidote—that have been masquerading as essential developmental genes in a nematode worm. She asks how many more so-called “essential genes” are really just self-perpetuating freeloaders? Science Careers Editor Rachel Bernstein is also here to talk about stress and work-life balance for researchers and science students. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170609.mp3




A new taste for the tongue, ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies, and early evidence for dog breeding

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on how we taste water, extracting ancient DNA from mummy heads, and the earliest evidence for dog breeding with Online News Editor David Grimm. Sarah Crespi talks to John Travis about postsurgical cognitive dysfunction—does surgery sap your brain power? Listen to previous podcasts. [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170602.mp3




How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles

Thu, 25 May 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not-so-distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm. Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first data from the Juno mission, including what Jupiter’s poles look like and a peak under its outer cloud layers. Listen to previous podcasts.  [Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170526.mp3




Preventing augmented-reality overload, fixing bone with tiny bubbles, and studying human migrations

Thu, 18 May 2017 15:00:00 -0400

This week we have stories on blocking dangerous or annoying distractions in augmented reality, gene therapy applied with ultrasound to heal bone breaks, and giving robots geckolike gripping power with Online News Editor David Grimm. Deputy News Editor Elizabeth Culotta joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a special package on human migrations—from the ancient origins of Europeans to the restless and wandering scientists of today. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170519.mp3




Our newest human relative, busting human sniff myths, and the greenhouse gas that could slow global warming

Thu, 11 May 2017 14:30:00 -0400

This week we have stories on ancient hominids that may have coexisted with early modern humans, methane seeps in the Arctic that could slow global warming, and understanding color without words with Online News Intern Lindzi Wessel. John McGann joins Sarah Crespi to discuss long-standing myths about our ability to smell. It turns out people are probably a lot better at detecting odors than scientists thought! Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Streluk/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170512.mp3




Podcast: Reading pain from the brains of infants, modeling digital faces, and wifi holograms

Thu, 04 May 2017 14:15:00 -0400

This week, we discuss the most accurate digital model of a human face to date, stray Wi-Fi signals that can be used to spy on a closed room, and artificial intelligence that can predict Supreme Court decisions with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Caroline Hartley joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a scan that can detect pain in babies—a useful tool when they can’t tell you whether something really hurts. Listen to previous podcasts. See more book segments.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170505.mp3




Podcast: Where dog breeds come from, bots that build buildings, and gathering ancient human DNA from cave sediments

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 16:00:00 -0400

This week, a new family tree of dog breeds, advances in artificial wombs, and an autonomous robot that can print a building with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Viviane Slon joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a new way to seek out ancient humans—without finding fossils or bones—by screening sediments for ancient DNA.   Jen Golbeck interviews Andrew Shtulman, author of Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong for this month’s book segment.    Listen to previous podcasts.   See more book segments.     Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: nimis69/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/show-template48k_mixdown.mp3




Podcast: When good lions go bad, listening to meteor crashes, and how humans learn to change the world

Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:45:00 -0400

This week, meteors’ hiss may come from radio waves, pigeons that build on the wings of those that came before, and a potential answer to the century-old mystery of what turned two lions into people eaters with Online News Editor David Grimm. Elise Amel joins Julia Rosen to discuss the role of evolution and psychology in humans’ ability to overcome norms and change the world, as part of a special issue on conservation this week in Science. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript  Transcripts courtesy Scribie.com  [Image: bjdlzx/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170421.mp3




Podcast: Watching shoes untie, Cassini’s last dive through the breath of a cryovolcano, and how human bias influences machine learning

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, walk like an elephant—very far, with seeds in your guts, Cassini’s mission to Saturn wraps up with news on the habitability of its icy moon Enceladus, and how our shoes manage to untie themselves with Online News Editor David Grimm. Aylin Caliskan joins Sarah Crespi to discuss how biases in our writing may be perpetuated by the machines that learn from them. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170414.mp3




Podcast: Giant virus genetics, human high-altitude adaptations, and quantifying the impact of government-funded science

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, viruses as remnants of a fourth domain of life, a scan of many Tibetan genomes reveals seven new genes potentially related to high-altitude life, and doubts about dark energy with Online News Editor David Grimm. Danielle Li joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study quantifying the impact of government funding on innovation by linking patents to U.S. National Institutes of Health grants. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: artubo/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170407.mp3




Podcast: Killing off stowaways to Mars, chasing synthetic opiates, and how soil contributes to global carbon calculations

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, how to avoid contaminating Mars with microbial hitchhikers, turning mammalian cells into biocomputers, and a look at how underground labs in China are creating synthetic opioids for street sales in the United States with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Caitlin Hicks Pries joins Julia Rosen to discuss her study of the response of soil carbon to a warming world. And for this month’s book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to Rob Dunn about his book Never Out of Season: How Having the Food We Want When We Want It Threatens Our Food Supply and Our Future. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170331.mp3




Podcast: Teaching self-driving cars to read, improving bike safety with a video game, and when ‘you’ isn’t about ‘you’

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, new estimates for the depths of the world’s lakes, a video game that could help kids be safer bike riders, and teaching autonomous cars to read road signs with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Ariana Orvell joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study of how the word “you” is used when people recount meaningful experiences. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: VisualCommunications/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170324.mp3




Podcast: The archaeology of democracy, new additions to the uncanny valley, and the discovery of ant-ibiotics

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 14:00:00 -0400

This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico. Listen to previous podcasts. Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170317.mp3




Podcast: Human pheromones lightly debunked, ignoring cyberattacks, and designer chromosomes

Thu, 09 Mar 2017 16:15:00 -0500

This week, how Flickr photos could help predict floods, why it might be a good idea to ignore some cyberattacks, and new questions about the existence of human pheromones with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Sarah Richardson joins Alexa Billow to discuss a global project to build a set of working yeast chromosomes from the ground up. Read Sarah Richardson’s research in Science. Listen to previous podcasts.   Download the show transcript. Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com. [Image: Drew Gurian; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170310.mp3




Podcast: Breaking the 2-hour marathon barrier, storing data in DNA, and how past civilizations shaped the Amazon

Thu, 02 Mar 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about the science behind breaking the 2-hour marathon barrier, storing data in DNA strands, and a dinosaur’s zigzagging backbones with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. And Carolina Levis joins Alexa Billow to discuss evidence that humans have been domesticating the Amazon’s plants a lot longer than previously thought.   Read Carolina Levis’s research in Science.     Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Carolina Levis; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170303.mp3




Podcast: Cracking the smell code, why dinosaurs had wings before they could fly, and detecting guilty feelings in altruistic gestures

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:15:00 -0500

This week, we chat about why people are nice to each other—does it feel good or are we just avoiding feeling bad—approaches to keeping arsenic out of the food supply, and using artificial intelligence to figure out what a chemical smells like to a human nose with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Stephen Brusatte joins Alexa Billow to discuss why dinosaurs evolved wings and feathers before they ever flew. And in the latest installment of our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Bill Schutt, author of Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History.   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Todd Marshall; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170224.mp3




Podcast: Recognizing the monkey in the mirror, giving people malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and keeping coastal waters clean with seagrass

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about what it means if a monkey can learn to recognize itself in a mirror, injecting people with live malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and insect-inspired wind turbines with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Joleah Lamb joins Alexa Billow to discuss how seagrass can greatly reduce harmful microbes in the ocean—protecting people and corals from disease. Read the research.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: peters99/iStock; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast170217.mp3




Podcast: Saving grizzlies from trains, cheap sun-powered water purification, and a deep look at science-based policymaking

Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about why grizzly bears seem to be dying on Canadian railway tracks, slow-release fertilizers that reduce environmental damage, and cleaning water with the power of the sun on the cheap, with Online News Editor David Grimm. And David Malakoff joins Alexa Billow to discuss a package of stories on the role of science and evidence in policymaking[link TK]. Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: tacky_ch/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast170210.mp3




Podcast: An 80-million-year-old dinosaur protein, sending oxygen to the moon, and competitive forecasting

Thu, 02 Feb 2017 14:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about how the Earth is sending oxygen to the moon, using a GPS data set to hunt for dark matter, and retrieving 80-million year old proteins from dinosaur bones, with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Philip Tetlock joins Alexa Billow to discuss improving our ability to make judgments about the future through forecasting competitions as part of a special section on prediction in this week’s issue of Science. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: NASA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170203.mp3




Podcast: Bringing back tomato flavor genes, linking pollution and dementia, and when giant otters roamed Earth

Thu, 26 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about 50-kilogram otters that once stalked southern China, using baseball stats to show how jet lag puts players off their game, and a growing link between pollution and dementia, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Also in this week’s show: our very first monthly book segment. In the inaugural segment, Jen Golbeck interviews Helen Pilcher about her new book Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction. Plus Denise Tieman joins Alexa Billow to discuss the genes behind tomato flavor, or lack thereof.   Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Dutodom; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170127.mp3




Podcast: Explaining menopause in killer whales, triggering killer mice, and the role of chromosome number in cancer immunotherapy

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about a surprising reason why killer whales undergo menopause, flipping a kill switch in mice with lasers, and Fukushima residents who measured their own radiation exposure[link tk], with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Stephen Elledge about the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities in tumors and immunotherapy for cancer.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Copyright Kenneth Balcomb Center for Whale Research; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170120.mp3




Podcast: A blood test for concussions, how the hagfish escapes from sharks, and optimizing carbon storage in trees

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:30:00 -0500

This week, we chat about a blood test that could predict recovery time after a concussion, new insights into the bizarre hagfish’s anatomy, and a cheap paper centrifuge based on a toy, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Christian Koerner about why just planting any old tree isn’t the answer to our carbon problem.    Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170113.mp3




Podcast: An ethics conundrum from the Nazi era, baby dinosaur development, and a new test for mad cow disease

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about how long dinosaur eggs take—or took—to hatch, a new survey that confirms the world’s hot spots for lightning, and replenishing endangered species with feral pets with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Megan Gannon about the dilemma presented by tissue samples collected during the Nazi era. And Sarah Crespi discusses a new test for mad cow disease with Kelly Servick.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: NASA/flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_170106.mp3




Podcast: Our Breakthrough of the Year, top online stories, and the year in science books

Thu, 22 Dec 2016 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about human evolution in action, 6000-year-old fairy tales, and other top news stories from 2016 with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about this year’s breakthrough, runners-up, breakdowns, and how Science’s predictions from last year help us. In a bonus segment, Science book review editor Valerie Thompson talks about the big science books of 2016 and science books for kids.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Warwick Goble; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/161223_SciencePodcast.mp3




The sound of a monkey talking, cloning horses for sport, and forensic anthropologists help the search for Mexico’s disappeared

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 13:59:00 -0500

This week, we chat about what talking monkeys would sound like, a surprising virus detected in ancient pottery, and six cloned horses that helped win a big polo match with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Lizzie Wade about what forensic anthropologists can do to help parent groups find missing family members in Mexico.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: (c) Félix Márquez; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161216.mp3




Podcast: Altering time perception, purifying blueberries with plasma, and checking in on ocelot latrines

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about cleaning blueberries with purple plasma, how Tibetan dogs adapted to high-altitude living, and who’s checking ocelot message boards with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Joe Paton about how we know time flies when mice are having fun.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Joseph Sites/USDA ARS; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161209.mp3




Podcast: What ants communicate when kissing, stars birthed from gas, and linking immune strength and social status

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about kissing communication in ants, building immune strength by climbing the social ladder, and a registry for animal research with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Bjorn Emonts about the birth of stars in the Spiderweb Galaxy 10 billion years ago.   Related research on immune function and social hierarchy.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Lauren Brent; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161202.mp3




Podcast: Scientists on the night shift, sucking up greenhouse gases with cement, and repetitive stress in tomb builders

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

 This week, we chat about cement’s shrinking carbon footprint, commuting hazards for ancient Egyptian artisans, and a new bipartisan group opposed to government-funded animal research in the United States with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Sam Kean about the kinds of data that can only be gathered at night as part of the special issue on circadian biology.  Listen to previous podcasts.  [Image: roomauction/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161125.mp3




Podcast: The rise of skeletons, species-blurring hybrids, and getting rightfully ditched by a taxi

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week we chat about why it’s hard to get a taxi to nowhere, why bones came onto the scene some 550 million years ago, and how targeting bacteria’s predilection for iron might make better vaccines, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks with news writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the way hybrids muck up the concept of species and turn the evolutionary tree into a tangled web.   Listen to previous podcasts   [Image:  Raul González Alegría; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161118.mp3




Podcast: How farms made dogs love carbs, the role of dumb luck in science, and what your first flu exposure did to you

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—is Bhutan really a quake-free zone, how much of scientific success is due to luck, and what farming changed about dogs and us—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Katelyn Gostic of the University of California, Los Angeles, about how the first flu you came down with—which depends on your birth year—may help predict your susceptibility to new flu strains down the road.   Listen to previous podcasts.     [Image:monkeybusinessimages/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161111.mp3




Podcast: The impact of legal pot on opioid abuse, and a very early look at a fetus’s genome

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, news writer Greg Miller chats with us about how the legalization of marijuana in certain U.S. states is having an impact on the nation’s opioid problem. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Sascha Drewlo about a new method for profiling the DNA of fetuses very early on in pregnancy.   [Image: OpenRangeStock/iStockphoto/Music: Jeffrey Cook] ++   Authors: Sarah Crespi; Alexa Billow


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161104.mp3




Podcast: A close look at a giant moon crater, the long tradition of eating rodents, and building evidence for Planet Nine

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—eating rats in the Neolithic, growing evidence for a gargantuan 9th planet in our solar system, and how to keep just the good parts of a hookworm infection—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Maria Zuber about NASA’s GRAIL spacecraft, which makes incredibly precise measurements of the moon’s gravity. This week’s guest used GRAIL data to explore a giant impact crater and learn more about the effects of giant impacts on the moon and Earth.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Ernest Wright, NASA/GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/sciencepodcast_161028.mp3




Podcast: Science lessons for the next U.S. president, human high altitude adjustments, and the elusive Higgs bison

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—jumping spiders that can hear without ears, long-lasting changes in the human body at high altitudes, and the long hunt for an extinct bison—with Science’s Online News Intern Jessica Boddy. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Deputy News Editor David Malakoff about six science lessons for the next U.S. president.    [Image: Gil Menda at the Hoy Lab; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161021.mp3




Podcast: When we pay attention to plane crashes, releasing modified mosquitoes, and bacteria that live off radiation

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories -- including a new bacterial model for alien life that feeds on cosmic rays, tracking extinct “bear dogs” to Texas, and when we stop caring about plane crashes -- with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to Staff Writer Kelly Servick about her feature story on the releasing modified mosquitoes in Brazil to combat diseases like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Her story is part of a package on mosquito control.  Listen to previous podcasts  [Image: © Alex Wild; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161014.mp3




Podcast: Bumble bee emotions, the purpose of yawning, and new insights into the developing infant brain

Thu, 06 Oct 2016 12:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—including making bees optimistic, comparing yawns across species, and “mind reading” in nonhuman apes—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Mercedes Paredes about her research on the developing infant brain.   Listen to previous podcasts   [Image: mdmiller/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]    


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161007.mp3




Podcast: Why we murder, resurrecting extinct animals, and the latest on the three-parent baby

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Daily news stories Should we bring animals back from extinction, three-parent baby announced, and the roots of human violence, with David Grimm.   From the magazine Our networked world gives us an unprecedented ability to monitor and respond to global happenings. Databases monitoring news stories can provide real-time information about events all over the world -- like conflicts or protests. However, the databases that now exist aren’t up to the task. Alexa Billow talks with Ryan Kennedy about his policy forum that addresses problems with global data collection and interpretation.   [Image: Stocktrek Images, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160930.mp3




Podcast: An atmospheric pacemaker skips a beat, a religious edict that spawned fat chickens, and knocking out the ‘sixth sense’

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:00:00 -0400

A quick change in chickens’ genes as a result of a papal ban on eating four-legged animals, the appeal of tragedy, and genetic defects in the “sixth sense,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine  In February of this year, one of the most regular phenomena in the atmosphere skipped a cycle. Every 22 to 36 months, descending eastward and westward wind jets—high above the equator—switch places. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, or QBO, is normally so regular you can almost set your watch by it, but not this year. Scott Osprey discusses the implications for this change with Alexa Billow.   Read the research.   [Image: ValerijaP/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160923.mp3




Podcast: A burning body experiment, prehistoric hunting dogs, and seeding life on other planets

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on our earliest hunting companions, should we seed exoplanets with life, and finding space storm hot spots with David Grimm.  From the magazine Two years ago, 43 students disappeared from a teacher’s college in Guerrero, Mexico. Months of protests and investigation have not yielded a believable account of what happened to them. The government of Mexico claims that the students were killed by cartel members and burned on an outdoor pyre in a dump outside Cucola. Lizzie Wade has been following this story with a focus on the science of fire investigation. She talks about an investigator in Australia that has burned pig carcasses in an effort to understand these events in Mexico.   [Image: Edgard Garrido/REUTERS/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160916.mp3




Podcast: Double navigation in desert ants, pollution in the brain, and dating deal breakers

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on magnetic waste in the brain, the top deal breakers in online dating, and wolves that are willing to “risk it for the biscuit,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine How do we track where we are going and where we have been? Do you pay attention to your path? Look for landmarks? Leave a scent trail? The problem of navigation has been solved a number of different ways by animals. The desert-dwelling Cataglyphis ant was thought to rely on stride integration, basically counting their steps. But it turns out they have a separate method of keeping track of their whereabouts called “optic flow.” Matthias Wittlinger joins Sarah Crespi to talk about his work with these amazing creatures.   Read the research.   [Image: Rooobert Bayer /Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160909.mp3




Podcast: Ceres’s close-up, how dogs listen, and a new RNA therapy

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on what words dogs know, an RNA therapy for psoriasis, and how Lucy may have fallen from the sky, with Catherine Matacic.  From the magazine In early 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. Over the last year and a half, scientists have studied the mysterious dwarf planet using data collected by Dawn, including detailed images of its surface. Julia Rosen talks with Debra Buczkowski about Ceres’s close-up.  See the full Ceres package.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160902.mp3




Podcast: Quantum dots in consumer electronics and a faceoff with the quiz master

Thu, 25 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Sarah Crespi takes a pop quiz on literal life hacking, spotting poverty from outer space, and the size of the average American vocabulary with Catherine Matacic.   From the magazine You can already buy a quantum dot television, but it’s really just the beginning of the infiltration of quantum dots into our everyday lives. Cherie Kagan is here to talk about her in depth review of the technology published in this week’s issue.   [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160826_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: How mice mess up reproducibility, new support for an RNA world, and giving cash away wisely

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on a humanmade RNA copier that bolsters ideas about early life on Earth, the downfall of a pre-Columbian empire, and how a bit of cash at the right time can keep you off the streets, with Jessica Boddy.   From the magazine This story combines two things we seem to talk about a lot on the podcast: reproducibility and the microbiome. The big question we’re going to take on is how reproducible are mouse studies when their microbiomes aren’t taken into account? Staff writer Kelly Servick is here to talk about what promises to be a long battle with mouse-dwelling bugs.   [Image: Annedde/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160819_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: 400-year-old sharks, busting a famous scientific hoax, and clinical trials in pets

Thu, 11 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on using pets in clinical trials to test veterinarian drugs, debunking the Piltdown Man once and for all, and deciding just how smart crows can be, with David Grimm.   From the magazine It’s really difficult to figure out how old a free-living animal is. Maybe you can find growth rings in bone or other calcified body parts, but in sharks like the Greenland shark, no such hardened parts exist. Using two different radiocarbon dating approaches, Julius Neilsen and colleagues discovered that the giant Greenland shark may live as long as 400 years.   Read the research.   [Image: James Howard McGregor/Wikimedia Commons/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160812.mp3




Podcast: Pollution hot spots in coastal waters, extreme bees, and diseased dinos

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 12:00:00 -0400

News stories on bees that live perilously close to the mouth of a volcano, diagnosing arthritis in dinosaur bones, and the evolution of the female orgasm, with David Grimm.  From the magazine Rivers deliver water to the ocean but water is also discharged along the coast in a much more diffuse way. This “submarine groundwater discharge” carries dissolved chemicals out to sea. But the underground nature of these outflows makes them difficult to quantify.  Audrey Sawyer talks with Sarah Crespi about the scale of this discharge and how it affects coastal waters surrounding the United States.  [Image: Hilary Erenler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160805_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: Saving wolves that aren’t really wolves, bird-human partnership, and our oldest common ancestor

Thu, 28 Jul 2016 12:00:00 -0400

Stories on birds that guide people to honey, genes left over from the last universal common ancestor, and what the nose knows about antibiotics, with Devi Shastri.  The Endangered Species Act—a 1973 U.S. law designed to protect animals in the country from extinction—may need a fresh look. The focus on “species” is the problem. This has become especially clear when it comes to wolves—recent genetic information has led to government agencies moving to delist the grey wolf. Robert Wayne helps untangle the wolf family tree and talks us through how a better understanding of wolf genetics may trouble their protected status.  [Image: Claire N. Spottiswoode/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160729_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: An omnipresent antimicrobial, a lichen ménage à trois, and tiny tide-induced tremors

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic.   Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.     [Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160722_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: The science of the apocalypse, and abstract thinking in ducklings

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

What do we know about humanity-ending catastrophes? Julia Rosen talks with Sarah Crespi about various doomsday scenarios and what science can do to save us. Alex Kacelnik talks about getting ducklings to recognize “same” and “different”—a striking finding that reveals conceptual thinking in very early life.  Read the related research. [Image: Antone Martinho/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160715.mp3




Podcast: An exoplanet with three suns, no relief for aching knees, and building better noses

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.  As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.  [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160708.mp3




Podcast: Ending AIDS in South Africa, what makes plants gamble, and genes that turn on after death

Thu, 30 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how plants know when to take risks, confirmation that the ozone layer is on the mend, and genes that come alive after death, with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Science news writer Jon Cohen talks with Julia Rosen about South Africa’s bid to end AIDS.   [Image: J.Seita/Flickr/Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160701.mp3




Podcast: A farewell to Science’s editor-in-chief, how mosquito spit makes us sick, and bears that use human shields

Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:00:00 -0400

Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Siegfried Klaus]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160624.mp3




Podcast: Treating cocaine addiction, mirror molecules in space, and new insight into autism

Thu, 16 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.   Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160617.mp3




Podcast: Scoliosis development, antiracing stripes, and the dawn of the hobbits

Thu, 09 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.   Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160610_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: Bionic leaves that make fuel, digging into dog domestication, and wars recorded in coral

Thu, 02 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on new evidence for double dog domestication, what traces of mercury in coral can tell us about local wars, and an update to a classic adaptation story, with online news editor David Grimm.   Brendan Colón talks about a bionic leaf system that captures light and carbon and converts it to several different types of fuels with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Andy Phillips/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160603.mp3




Podcast: The economics of the Uber era, mysterious Neandertal structures, and an octopus boom

Thu, 26 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on underground rings built by Neandertals, worldwide increases in cephalopods and a controversial hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease.   Glen Weyl joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss academics’ role in rising markets that depend on data and networks of people. We’re lucky to live in the age of the match—need a ride, a song, a husband? There’s an app that can match your needs to the object of your desire, with some margin of error. But much of this innovation is happening in the private sector—what is academia doing to contribute?   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Etienne Fabre / SSAC]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160527.mp3




Podcast: Tracking rats in a city slum, the giraffe genome, and watching human evolution in action

Thu, 19 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on finding clues to giraffes’ height in their genomes, evidence that humans are still evolving from massive genome projects, and studies that infect humans with diseases on purpose.  Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an intense study of slum-dwelling rats. [Image: Mauricio Susin]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160520.mp3




Podcast: Rocky remnants of early Earth, plants turned predator, and a new artificial second skin

Thu, 12 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories how the Venus flytrap turned to the meat-eating side, a new clingy polymer film that shrinks up eye bags, and survey results on who pirates scientific papers and why.   Hanika Rizo joins Julia Rosen to discuss evidence that parts of Earth have remained unchanged since the planet formed.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160513.mp3