Subscribe: Science Magazine Podcast
http://www.sciencemag.org/rss/podcast.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
crespi  david grimm  david  discusses  grimm  news roundup  news stories  news  online news  sarah crespi  sarah  stories 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast



Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.



 



Podcast: What ants communicate when kissing, stars birthed from gas, and linking immune strength and social status

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 14:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about kissing communication in ants, building immune strength by climbing the social ladder, and a registry for animal research with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Bjorn Emonts about the birth of stars in the Spiderweb Galaxy 10 billion years ago. Related research on immune function and social hierarchy.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Lauren Brent; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161202.mp3




Podcast: Scientists on the night shift, sucking up greenhouse gases with cement, and repetitive stress in tomb builders

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 14:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about cement’s shrinking carbon footprint, commuting hazards for ancient Egyptian artisans, and a new bipartisan group opposed to government-funded animal research in the United States with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Sam Kean about the kinds of data that can only be gathered at night as part of the special issue on circadian biology.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: roomauction/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161125.mp3




Podcast: The rise of skeletons, species-blurring hybrids, and getting rightfully ditched by a taxi

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 14:00:00 -0500

This week we chat about why it’s hard to get a taxi to nowhere, why bones came onto the scene some 550 million years ago, and how targeting bacteria’s predilection for iron might make better vaccines, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks with news writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the way hybrids muck up the concept of species and turn the evolutionary tree into a tangled web.   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Raul González Alegría; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161118.mp3




Podcast: How farms made dogs love carbs, the role of dumb luck in science, and what your first flu exposure did to you

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 14:00:00 -0500

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—is Bhutan really a quake-free zone, how much of scientific success is due to luck, and what farming changed about dogs and us—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Katelyn Gostic of the University of California, Los Angeles, about how the first flu you came down with—which depends on your birth year—may help predict your susceptibility to new flu strains down the road.   Listen to previous podcasts.     [Image:monkeybusinessimages/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161111.mp3




Podcast: The impact of legal pot on opioid abuse, and a very early look at a fetus’s genome

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 14:00:00 -0400

This week, news writer Greg Miller chats with us about how the legalization of marijuana in certain U.S. states is having an impact on the nation’s opioid problem. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Sascha Drewlo about a new method for profiling the DNA of fetuses very early on in pregnancy.   [Image: OpenRangeStock/iStockphoto/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161104.mp3




Podcast: A close look at a giant moon crater, the long tradition of eating rodents, and building evidence for Planet Nine

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 14:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—eating rats in the Neolithic, growing evidence for a gargantuan 9th planet in our solar system, and how to keep just the good parts of a hookworm infection—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Maria Zuber about NASA’s GRAIL spacecraft, which makes incredibly precise measurements of the moon’s gravity. This week’s guest used GRAIL data to explore a giant impact crater and learn more about the effects of giant impacts on the moon and Earth. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Ernest Wright, NASA/GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/sciencepodcast_161028.mp3




Podcast: Science lessons for the next U.S. president, human high altitude adjustments, and the elusive Higgs bison

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 14:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—jumping spiders that can hear without ears, long-lasting changes in the human body at high altitudes, and the long hunt for an extinct bison—with Science’s Online News Intern Jessica Boddy. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Deputy News Editor David Malakoff about six science lessons for the next U.S. president.    Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Gil Menda at the Hoy Lab; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161021.mp3




Podcast: When we pay attention to plane crashes, releasing modified mosquitoes, and bacteria that live off radiation

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 14:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—including a new bacterial model for alien life that feeds on cosmic rays, tracking extinct “bear dogs” to Texas, and when we stop caring about plane crashes—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to Staff Writer Kelly Servick about her feature story on releasing modified mosquitoes in Brazil to combat diseases like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Her story is part of a package on mosquito control. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: © Alex Wild; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161014.mp3




Podcast: Bumble bee emotions, the purpose of yawning, and new insights into the developing infant brain

Thu, 06 Oct 2016 14:00:00 -0400

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—including making bees optimistic, comparing yawns across species, and “mind reading” in nonhuman apes—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Mercedes Paredes about her research on the developing infant brain.   Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: mdmiller/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]    


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_161007.mp3




Podcast: Why we murder, resurrecting extinct animals, and the latest on the three-parent baby

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Daily news stories Should we bring animals back from extinction, three-parent baby announced, and the roots of human violence, with David Grimm.   From the magazine Our networked world gives us an unprecedented ability to monitor and respond to global happenings. Databases monitoring news stories can provide real-time information about events all over the world -- like conflicts or protests. However, the databases that now exist aren’t up to the task. Alexa Billow talks with Ryan Kennedy about his policy forum that addresses problems with global data collection and interpretation.   [Image: Stocktrek Images, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160930.mp3




Podcast: An atmospheric pacemaker skips a beat, a religious edict that spawned fat chickens, and knocking out the ‘sixth sense’

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:00:00 -0400

A quick change in chickens’ genes as a result of a papal ban on eating four-legged animals, the appeal of tragedy, and genetic defects in the “sixth sense,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine  In February of this year, one of the most regular phenomena in the atmosphere skipped a cycle. Every 22 to 36 months, descending eastward and westward wind jets—high above the equator—switch places. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, or QBO, is normally so regular you can almost set your watch by it, but not this year. Scott Osprey discusses the implications for this change with Alexa Billow.   Read the research.   [Image: ValerijaP/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160923.mp3




Podcast: A burning body experiment, prehistoric hunting dogs, and seeding life on other planets

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 14:00:00 -0400

News stories on our earliest hunting companions, should we seed exoplanets with life, and finding space storm hot spots with David Grimm.   From the magazine Two years ago, 43 students disappeared from a teacher’s college in Guerrero, Mexico. Months of protests and investigation have not yielded a believable account of what happened to them. The government of Mexico claims that the students were killed by cartel members and burned on an outdoor pyre in a dump outside Cucola. Lizzie Wade has been following this story with a focus on the science of fire investigation. She talks about an investigator in Australia that has burned pig carcasses in an effort to understand these events in Mexico.   [Image: Edgard Garrido/Reuters; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160916.mp3




Podcast: Double navigation in desert ants, pollution in the brain, and dating deal breakers

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 13:59:00 -0400

News stories on magnetic waste in the brain, the top deal breakers in online dating, and wolves that are willing to “risk it for the biscuit,” with David Grimm.   From the magazine How do we track where we are going and where we have been? Do you pay attention to your path? Look for landmarks? Leave a scent trail? The problem of navigation has been solved a number of different ways by animals. The desert-dwelling Cataglyphis ant was thought to rely on stride integration, basically counting their steps. But it turns out they have a separate method of keeping track of their whereabouts called “optic flow.” Matthias Wittlinger joins Sarah Crespi to talk about his work with these amazing creatures.   Read the research.   [Image: Rooobert Bayer /Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160909.mp3




Podcast: Ceres’s close-up, how dogs listen, and a new RNA therapy

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 14:00:00 -0400

News stories on what words dogs know, an RNA therapy for psoriasis, and how Lucy may have fallen from the sky, with Catherine Matacic.   From the magazine In early 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. Over the last year and a half, scientists have studied the mysterious dwarf planet using data collected by Dawn, including detailed images of its surface. Julia Rosen talks with Debra Buczkowski about Ceres’s close-up.   See the full Ceres package. [Image: Enikő Kubinyi /Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160902.mp3




Podcast: Quantum dots in consumer electronics and a faceoff with the quiz master

Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:00:00 -0400

Sarah Crespi takes a pop quiz on literal life hacking, spotting poverty from outer space, and the size of the average American's vocabulary with Catherine Matacic.   From the magazine You can already buy a quantum dot television, but it’s really just the beginning of the infiltration of quantum dots into our everyday lives. Cherie Kagan is here to talk about her in-depth review of the technology published in this week’s issue.   [Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160826_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: How mice mess up reproducibility, new support for an RNA world, and giving cash away wisely

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 14:30:00 -0400

News stories on a humanmade RNA copier that bolsters ideas about early life on Earth, the downfall of a pre-Columbian empire, and how a bit of cash at the right time can keep you off the streets, with Jessica Boddy.   From the magazine This story combines two things we seem to talk about a lot on the podcast: reproducibility and the microbiome. The big question we’re going to take on is how reproducible are mouse studies when their microbiomes aren’t taken into account? Staff writer Kelly Servick is here to talk about what promises to be a long battle with mouse-dwelling bugs.   [Image: Annedde/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160819_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: 400-year-old sharks, busting a famous scientific hoax, and clinical trials in pets

Thu, 11 Aug 2016 14:00:00 -0400

News stories on using pets in clinical trials to test veterinarian drugs, debunking the Piltdown Man once and for all, and deciding just how smart crows can be, with David Grimm.   From the magazine It’s really difficult to figure out how old a free-living animal is. Maybe you can find growth rings in bone or other calcified body parts, but in sharks like the Greenland shark, no such hardened parts exist. Using two different radiocarbon dating approaches, Julius Nielsen and colleagues discovered that the giant Greenland shark may live as long as 400 years. Read the research.   [Image: James Howard McGregor/Wikimedia Commons; Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160812.mp3




Podcast: Pollution hot spots in coastal waters, extreme bees, and diseased dinos

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 14:00:00 -0400

News stories on bees that live perilously close to the mouth of a volcano, diagnosing arthritis in dinosaur bones, and the evolution of the female orgasm, with David Grimm.   From the magazine Rivers deliver water to the ocean but water is also discharged along the coast in a much more diffuse way. This “submarine groundwater discharge” carries dissolved chemicals out to sea. But the underground nature of these outflows makes them difficult to quantify.  Audrey Sawyer talks with Sarah Crespi about the scale of this discharge and how it affects coastal waters surrounding the United States.   [Image: Hilary Erenler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160805_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: Saving wolves that aren’t really wolves, bird-human partnership, and our oldest common ancestor

Thu, 28 Jul 2016 14:00:00 -0400

Stories on birds that guide people to honey, genes leftover from the last universal common ancestor, and what the nose knows about antibiotics, with Devi Shastri. The Endangered Species Act—a 1973 U.S. law designed to protect animals in the country from extinction—may need a fresh look. The focus on “species” is the problem. This has become especially clear when it comes to wolves—recent genetic information has led to government agencies moving to delist the gray wolf. Robert Wayne helps untangle the wolf family tree and talks us through how a better understanding of wolf genetics may trouble their protected status. [Image: Claire N. Spottiswoode/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160729_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: An omnipresent antimicrobial, a lichen ménage à trois, and tiny tide-induced tremors

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 14:30:00 -0400

Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic. Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.     [Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160722_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: The science of the apocalypse, and abstract thinking in ducklings

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:15:00 -0400

What do we know about humanity-ending catastrophes? Julia Rosen talks with Sarah Crespi about various doomsday scenarios and what science can do to save us. Alex Kacelnik talks about getting ducklings to recognize “same” and “different”—a striking finding that reveals conceptual thinking in very early life. Read the related research. [Image: Antone Martinho/Music: Jeffrey Cook]   Additional articles in our Natural Hazards feature package: Introduction on taming nature’s fury: an in-depth look at natural hazards Here’s how the world could end—and what we can do about it These disaster machines could help humanity prepare for cataclysms Blogging the danger—and sometimes the art—of deadly landslides Review on Historical trends of tropical cyclone tracks by H. Sobel et al. and related Interactive graphic displays tropical cyclone tracks from 1980-2014 Review on global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping by S. Voigt et al. Review on connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes by K. Obara and A. Kato  Editorial on hazards without disasters by M. McNutt Natural Hazards topic page  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160715.mp3




Podcast: An exoplanet with three suns, no relief for aching knees, and building better noses

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.  As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.  [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160708.mp3




Podcast: Ending AIDS in South Africa, what makes plants gamble, and genes that turn on after death

Thu, 30 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on how plants know when to take risks, confirmation that the ozone layer is on the mend, and genes that come alive after death, with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Science news writer Jon Cohen talks with Julia Rosen about South Africa’s bid to end AIDS.   [Image: J.Seita/Flickr/Music: Jeffrey Cook]  


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160701.mp3




Podcast: A farewell to Science’s editor-in-chief, how mosquito spit makes us sick, and bears that use human shields

Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:00:00 -0400

Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Siegfried Klaus]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160624.mp3




Podcast: Treating cocaine addiction, mirror molecules in space, and new insight into autism

Thu, 16 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.   Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160617.mp3




Podcast: Scoliosis development, antiracing stripes, and the dawn of the hobbits

Thu, 09 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.   Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/160610_SciencePodcast.mp3




Podcast: Bionic leaves that make fuel, digging into dog domestication, and wars recorded in coral

Thu, 02 Jun 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Listen to stories on new evidence for double dog domestication, what traces of mercury in coral can tell us about local wars, and an update to a classic adaptation story, with online news editor David Grimm.   Brendan Colón talks about a bionic leaf system that captures light and carbon and converts it to several different types of fuels with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Andy Phillips/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0/Music: Jeffrey Cook]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160603.mp3




Podcast: The economics of the Uber era, mysterious Neandertal structures, and an octopus boom

Thu, 26 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on underground rings built by Neandertals, worldwide increases in cephalopods and a controversial hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease.   Glen Weyl joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss academics’ role in rising markets that depend on data and networks of people. We’re lucky to live in the age of the match—need a ride, a song, a husband? There’s an app that can match your needs to the object of your desire, with some margin of error. But much of this innovation is happening in the private sector—what is academia doing to contribute?   [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Etienne Fabre / SSAC]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160527.mp3




Podcast: Tracking rats in a city slum, the giraffe genome, and watching human evolution in action

Thu, 19 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on finding clues to giraffes’ height in their genomes, evidence that humans are still evolving from massive genome projects, and studies that infect humans with diseases on purpose.  Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an intense study of slum-dwelling rats. [Image: Mauricio Susin]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160520.mp3




Podcast: Rocky remnants of early Earth, plants turned predator, and a new artificial second skin

Thu, 12 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories how the Venus flytrap turned to the meat-eating side, a new clingy polymer film that shrinks up eye bags, and survey results on who pirates scientific papers and why.   Hanika Rizo joins Julia Rosen to discuss evidence that parts of Earth have remained unchanged since the planet formed.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160513.mp3




Podcast: Why animal personalities matter, killer whale sanctuaries, and the key to making fraternal twins

Thu, 05 May 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on a proposal for an orca sanctuary in the sea, the genes behind conceiving fraternal twins, and why CRISPR won’t be fixing the sick anytime soon.   Elizabeth Pennisi joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss bold birds, shy spiders, and the importance of animal personality.   [Image: Judy Gallagher]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160506.mp3




Podcast: Patent trolls, the earthquake-volcano link, and obesity in China

Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on how earthquakes may trigger volcanic eruptions, growing obesity in China’s children, and turning salty water sweet on the cheap.   Lauren Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the rise of patent trolls in the United States and a proposal for cutting back on their sizable profits.     [Image: © Alberto Garcia/Corbis]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160429.mp3




Podcast: Sizing up a baby dino, jolting dead brains, and dirty mice

Thu, 21 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on a possibledebunking of a popular brain stimulation technique, using “dirty” mice in the lab to simulate the human immune system, and how South American monkeys’ earliest ancestors used rafts to get to Central America.   Kristi Curry Rogers joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss insights into dinosaur growth patterns from the bones of a baby titanosaur found in Madagascar.  Read the research.   [Image: K. Curry Rogers et al./Science]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160422.mp3




Podcast: Tracking Zika, the evolution of sign language, and changing hearts and minds with social science

Thu, 14 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on the evolution of sign language, short conversations than can change minds on social issues, and finding the one-in-a-million people who seem to be resistant to certain genetic diseases—even if they carry genes for them.   Nuno Faria joins host Sarah Crespi to explain how genomic analysis can track Zika’s entry date into Brazil and follow its spread.     [Image: r.a. olea/Flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160415.mp3




Podcast: Spreading cancer, sacrificing humans, and transplanting organs

Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on evidence for the earth being hit by supernovae, record-breaking xenotransplantation, and winning friends and influencing people with human sacrifice.   Staff news writer Jocelyn Kaiser joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how small membrane-bound packets called “exosomes” might pave the way for cancer cells to move into new territory in the body.     [Image: Val Altounian/Science]    


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160408.mp3




Podcast: Building a portable drug factory, mapping yeast globally, and watching cliffs crumble

Thu, 31 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on yeasty hitchhikers, sunlight-induced rockfalls, and the tiniest gravity sensor.   Andrea Adamo joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a revolutionary way of making drugs using a portable, on-demand, and reconfigurable drug factory.     [Image: Tom Evans]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160401.mp3




Podcast: Battling it out in the Bronze Age, letting go of orcas, and evolving silicon-based life

Thu, 24 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on SeaWorld’s plans for killer whales, the first steps toward silicon-based life, and the ripple effect of old dads on multiple generations.   Andrew Curry joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a grisly find in Northern Germany that suggests Bronze Age northern Europe was more organized and more violent than thought.   [Image: ANDESAMT FÜR KULTUR UND DENKMALPFLEGE MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN/LANDESARCHÄOLOGIE/S. SUHR ]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160325.mp3




Podcast: The latest news from Pluto, a rock-eating fungus, and tracking storm damage with Twitter

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 13:59:00 -0400

News intern Nala Rogers shares stories on mineral-mining microbes, mapping hurricane damage using social media, and the big takeaway from the latest human-versus-computer match up.   Hal Weaver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss five papers from New Horizons Pluto flyby, including a special focus on Pluto’s smaller moons.   [Image: Saran_Poroong/iStockphoto]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160318.mp3




Podcast: Nuclear forensics, honesty in a sea of lies, and how sliced meat drove human evolution

Thu, 10 Mar 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on the influence of governmental corruption on the honesty of individuals, what happened when our ancestors cut back on the amount of time spent chewing food, and how plants use sand to grind herbivores‘ gears.   Science’s International News Editor Rich Stone joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his forensics story on how to track down the culprits after a nuclear detonation.   [Image: Miroslav Boskov]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160311.mp3




Podcast: Glowing robot skin, zombie frogs, and viral fossils in our DNA

Thu, 03 Mar 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on zombification by a frog-killing fungus, relating the cosmological constant to life in the universe, and ancient viral genes that protect us from illness.   Chris Larson joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new type of robot skin that can stretch and glow.   [Image: Jungbae Park]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160304.mp3




Podcast: A recipe for clean and tasty drinking water, a gauge on rapidly rising seas, and fake flowers that can fool the most discerning insects

Thu, 25 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on what we can learn from 6million years of climate data, how to make lifelike orchids with 3D printing, and crowdsourced gender bias on eBay.   Fernando Rosario-Ortiz joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how approaches to water purification differ between countries.   [Image: Eric Hunt/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0] 0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160226.mp3




Podcast: Combatting malnutrition with gut microbes, fighting art forgers with science, and killing cancer with gold

Thu, 18 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on how our abilities shape our minds, killing cancer cells with gold nanoparticles, and catching art forgery with cat hair.   Laura Blanton joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how nourishing our gut microbes may prevent malnutrition. Read the related research in Science.   [Image: D. S. Wagner et al., Biomaterials, 31 (2010)]   Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160219.mp3




Podcast: The effects of Neandertal DNA on health, squishing bugs for science, and sleepy confessions

Thu, 11 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on confessions extracted from sleepy people, malaria hiding out in deer, and making squishable bots based on cockroaches.   Corinne Simonti joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss whether Neandertal DNA in the human genome is helping or hurting. Read the related research in Science.   [Image: Tom Libby, Kaushik Jayaram and Pauline Jennings. Courtesy of PolyPEDAL Lab UC Berkeley.]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160212.mp3




Podcast: Taking race out of genetics, a cellular cleanse for longer life, and smart sweatbands

Thu, 04 Feb 2016 14:00:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on killing cells to lengthen life, getting mom’s microbes after a C-section, and an advanced fitness tracker that sits on the wrist and sips sweat.   Michael Yudell joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an initiative to replace race in genetics with more biologically meaningful terms, and Lena Wilfert talks about drivers of the global spread of the bee-killing deformed wing virus.   [Image: Vipin Baliga/(CC BY 2.0)]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160205.mp3




Podcast: Babylonian astronomers, doubly domesticated cats, and outrunning a T. Rex

Thu, 28 Jan 2016 03:30:00 -0500

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on 66-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex tracks, a signature of human consciousness, and a second try at domesticating cats. Mathieu Ossendrijver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss newly translated Babylonian tablets that extend the roots of calculus all the way back to between 350 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E. Read the related research in Science.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160129.mp3




Podcast: A planet beyond Pluto, the bugs in your home, and the link between marijuana and IQ

Thu, 21 Jan 2016 14:45:00 -0500

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on studying marijuana use in teenage twins, building a better maze for psychological experiments, and a close inspection of the bugs in our homes. Science News Writer Eric Hand joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the potential for a ninth planet in the solar system that circles the sun just once every 15,000 years.  [Image: Gilles San Martin/CC BY-SA 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160122.mp3




Podcast: Wounded mammoths, brave birds, bright bulbs, and more

Thu, 14 Jan 2016 14:00:00 -0500

In this week’s podcast, David Grimm talks about brave birds, building a brighter light bulb, and changing our voice to influence our emotions. Plus, Ann Gibbons discusses the implications of a butchered 45,000-year-old mammoth found in the Siberian arctic for human migration. Read the related research in Science. [IMG: Dmitry Bogdanov]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160115.mp3




Podcast: Dancing dinosaurs, naked black holes, and more

Fri, 08 Jan 2016 11:45:00 -0500

What stripped an unusual black hole of its stars? Can a bipolar drug change ant behavior? And did dinosaurs dance to woo mates? Science's Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science's Multimedia Producer Sarah Crespi. Plus,Science's Emily Underwood wades into the muddled world of migraine research, and Jessica Metcalf talks about using modern microbial means to track mammalian decomposition.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_160108.mp3




The Science breakthrough of the year, readers' choice, and the top news from 2015.

Thu, 17 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Robert Coontz discusses Science's 2015 Breakthrough of the Year and runners-up, from visions of Pluto to the discovery of a previously unknown human species. Online news editor David Grimm reviews the top news stories of the past year with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151218.mp3




Artificial intelligence programs that learn concepts based on just a few examples and a daily news roundup

Thu, 10 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Brenden Lake discusses a new computational model that rivals the human ability to learn new concepts based on just a single example; David Grimm talks about attracting cockroaches, searching for habitable planets, and looking to street dogs to learn about domestication. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Rodrigo Basaure CC BY 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151211.mp3




How our gut microbiota change as we age and a daily news roundup

Thu, 03 Dec 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Paul O'Toole discusses what happens to our gut microbes as we age; David Grimm talks about competent grandmas, our tilted moon, and gender in the brain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Dhinakaran Gajavarathan CC BY 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151204.mp3




Can "big data" from mobile phones pinpoint pockets of poverty? And a news roundup

Thu, 26 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Joshua Blumenstock discusses patterns of mobile phone use as a source of "big data" about wealth and poverty in developing countries; David Grimm talks about gene drives, helpful parasites, and electric roses. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: A.A. JAMES]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151127.mp3




Bioengineering functional vocal cords and a daily news roundup

Thu, 19 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Jennifer Long explains how scientists have engineered human vocal cords; Catherine Matacic talks about vanquishing a deadly amphibian fungus, pigeons that spot cancer, and more. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Jaime Bosch MNCN-CSIC]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151120.mp3




The consequences of mass extinction and a daily news roundup

Thu, 12 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Lauren Sallan discusses the consequences of a mass extinction event 359 million years ago on vertebrate body size; David Grimm talks about grandma's immune system, gambling on studies, and killer genes. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Robert Nicholls]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151113.mp3




The evolution of Mars' atmosphere and a daily news roundup

Thu, 05 Nov 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Bruce Jakosky discusses where Mars' once-thick, CO2-ish atmosphere went and the first data from the MAVEN mission to study the Red Planet; David Grimm talks about worm allergies, fake fingerprints, and toilets for all. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NASA]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151106.mp3




The origins of biodiversity in the Amazon and a daily news roundup

Thu, 29 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Lizzie Wade discusses whether the amazing biodiversity of the Amazon Basin was the result of massive flooding, or the uplift of the Andes mountain range. David Grimm talks about microbes aboard the International Space Station, the fate of juvenile giant ground sloths during the Pleistocene, and singing classes as social glue. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: ©Jason Houston]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151030.mp3




The neuroscience of reversing blindness and a daily news roundup

Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Rhitu Chatterjee discusses Project Prakash and the neuroscience behind reversing blindness in children, teenagers, and adults in rural India; David Grimm talks about where dogs came from, when life first evolved, and holes in the brain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Francois de Halleux CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151023.mp3




Pluto's mysteries revealed and a daily news roundup

Thu, 15 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Alan Stern discusses the first scientific results from the New Horizons July 14 flyby of Pluto, which revealed details about the dwarf planet's geology, surface composition, and atmosphere; Catherine Matacic talks about dino temps, Paleo-sleeping, and editing pig organs. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151016.mp3




Can math apps benefit kids? And a daily news roundup

Thu, 08 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Talia Berkowitz discusses the use of a math app at home to boost math achievement at school, Catherine Matacic talks about the fate of animals near Chernobyl, a potential kitty contraceptive, and where spiders got their knees. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151009.mp3




Safer jet fuels and a daily news roundup

Thu, 01 Oct 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Julia Kornfield discusses the design of safer jet fuel additives using polymer theory to control misting and prevent fires, David Grimm talks about building a better sunscreen, cultures that don't count past four, and does empathy mean feeling literal pain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Eduard Marmet/CC BY-SA-3.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_151002.mp3




3-parent gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and a news roundup

Thu, 24 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Kimberly Dunham-Snary discusses the long-term health considerations of gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and David Grimm talks about the smell of death, Mercury crashing, and animal IQ. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Ben Gracewood CC BY-NC 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150925.mp3




How future elites view self-interest and equality and a news roundup

Thu, 17 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Daniel Markovits discusses the preferences for fairness and equiality among potential future US leaders and David Grimm talks about finding fluorine's origins, persistant lone wolves, and the domestiction of the chicken. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Philip Pikart/CC BY-SA 4.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150918.mp3




Genes and the human microbiome and a news roundup

Thu, 10 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Seth Bordenstein discusses how our genes affect the composition of our microbiome, influencing our health, and David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about the origins of the Basque language, the benefits of being raised in a barn, and how some flying ants lost their wings. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Decaseconds/CC BY-NC 2.0, via flickr


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150911.mp3




The state of science in Iran and a news roundup

Thu, 03 Sep 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Rich Stone discusses science in Iran in the face of economic sanctions. David Grimm brings stories on sleep deprivation and the common cold, plastic in birds, and counting trees. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Credit: Alessandro Marongiu / Demotix /Corbis]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150904.mp3




Moralizing gods, scientific reproducibility, and a daily news roundup

Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Brian Nosek discusses the reproducibility of science, Lizzie Wade delves into the origin of religions with moralizing gods. David Grimm talks about debunking the young Earth, a universal flu vaccine, and short, sweet paper titles. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: DIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150828.mp3




Human superpredators and a news roundup

Thu, 20 Aug 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Chris Darimont discusses the impact of humans' unique predatory behavior on the planet and Catherine Matacic talks with Sarah Crespi about whistled languages, Neolithic massacres, and too many gas giants. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Andrew S Wright]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150821.mp3




Marmoset monkey vocal development and a news roundup

Thu, 13 Aug 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Asif Ghazanfar discusses how marmoset parents influence their babies' vocal development and Hanae Armitage talks with Sarah Crespi about the influence of livestock on biodiversity hotspots, trusting internet search results, and ant-like robots. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Carmem A. Busko, CC BY-2.5]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150814.mp3




Effective Ebola vaccines and a daily news roundup

Thu, 06 Aug 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Andrea Marzi discusses a vaccine that is effective against Ebola in monkeys and David Grimm talks about weigh-loss surgery, carbon suckers, and sexist HVAC. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NIAID]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150807.mp3




Comet chemistry and a news roundup

Thu, 30 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Fred Goesmann discusses Philae's bumpy landing on Comet 67P, and the organic compounds it detected there, and Hanae Armitage talks with Sarah Crespi about this week’s online news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: NAVCAM/ESA/Rosetta]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150731.mp3




Ancient DNA and a news roundup

Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Elizabeth Culotta discusses the ancient DNA revolution and David Grimm brings online news stories about rising autism numbers, shark safety, and tiny cloudmakers. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Alexander Maklakov]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150724.mp3




AI therapists and a news roundup

Thu, 16 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0400

John Bohannon discusses using artificial intelligence in the psychologist's chair and David Grimm brings online news stories about the age of human hands, deadly weather, and biological GPS. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img:Nils Rinaldi/Flickr]


Media Files:
http://sciencemag.libsyn.com/ai-therapists-and-a-news-roundup




Jumping soft bots and a news roundup

Thu, 09 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Nick Bartlett discusses the challenges of building a jumping soft robot and David Grimm brings online news stories about drug violence in Mexico, pollution's effect on weather, and drugging away our altruism. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Stephen Wolfe/Flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150710.mp3




The scent of a rose and a news roundup

Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Silvie Baudino discusses the biosynthesis of the compounds responsible for the scents of roses and David Grimm brings online news stories about hearing fractals, muon detectors, and bobcat burials. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: liz west/Flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150703.mp3




Metallic hydrogen and a daily news roundup.

Thu, 25 Jun 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Marcus Knudson discusses making metallic hydrogen and how it can better our understanding of gas giant planets and David Grimm brings online news stories about kid justice, part-time dieting, and bird brains. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NASA/ESA]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150626.mp3




Tracking ivory with genetics, the letter R, and a news roundup

Thu, 18 Jun 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Samuel Wasser discusses using genetics to track down sources of elephant ivory, Suzanne Boyce talks with Susanne Bard about why it's so hard to say the letter R, and David Grimm brings online news stories about declining devils, keeping dinos out of North America, and the tiniest flea circus. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: guido da rozze/Flickr CC BY 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150619.mp3




Tracking aquatic animals, cochlear implants, and a news roundup

Thu, 11 Jun 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Sara Iverson discusses how telemetry has transformed the study of animal behavior in aquatic ecosystems, and Monita Chatterjee discusses the impact of cochlear implants on the ability to recognize emotion in voices, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © marinesavers.com]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150612.mp3




Friction at the atomic level, the acoustics of historical speeches, and a news roundup

Thu, 04 Jun 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Alexei Bylinskii discusses friction at the atomic level and Braxton Boren talks about the acoustics of historical spaces, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Pericles' Funeral Oration by Philipp von Foltz, 1852]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150605.mp3




Climate change and China's tea crop and a news roundup

Thu, 28 May 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Christina Larson discusses the impact of climate change on China's tea and other globally sensitive crops, and Emily Conover discusses daily news stories with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Yosomono/Creative Commons License BY 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150529.mp3




Testosterone, women, and elite sports and a news roundup

Thu, 21 May 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Katrina Karkazis discusses the controversial use of testosterone testing by elite sports organizations to determine who can compete as a woman, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150522.mp3




Science in Cuba and a news roundup

Thu, 14 May 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Richard Stone discusses science in Cuba: isolation, innovation, and future partnerships, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Garry Balding/Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150515.mp3




How the measles virus disables immunity to other diseases and a news roundup

Thu, 07 May 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Michael Mina discusses how measles destroys immunity to other infectious diseases and why the measles vaccine has led to disproportionate reductions in childhood mortality since its introduction 50 years ago, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: UNICEF Ethiopia/Creative Commons License BY-NC-ND 2.0, via flickr]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150508.mp3




Sustainable seafood and a news roundup

Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:00:00 -0400

James Sanchirico discusses the challenges of creating sustainable fisheries in developing countries, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Simon Bush]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150501.mp3




Hubble's 25th anniversary and a news roundup

Thu, 23 Apr 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Hubble at 25: Daniel Clery discusses the contributions of the Hubble Space Telescope to our understanding of the universe, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: NASA]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150424.mp3




The bond between people and dogs and a news roundup

Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Evan MacLean discusses the role of oxytocin in mediating the relationship between dogs and people, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Teresa Alexander-Arab/flickr/Creative Commons BY-ND 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150417.mp3




Mountain gorilla genomes and a news roundup

Thu, 09 Apr 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Chris Tyler-Smith discusses what whole genome sequencing reveals about the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of endangered mountain gorillas, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Berzerker/flickr/Creative Commons License BY-NC-ND 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150410.mp3




The Deepwater Horizon disaster: Five years later.

Thu, 02 Apr 2015 14:00:00 -0400

5th Anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster: Marcia McNutt discusses the role of science in responding to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Warren Cornwall examines the state of ecological recovery 5 years later. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Bryan Tarnowski/Science Magazine]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150403.mp3




Child abuse across generations and a news roundup

Thu, 26 Mar 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Cathy Spatz Widom discusses whether child abuse is transmitted across generations. Angela Colmone has a round-up of advances in immunotherapy from Science Translational Medicine, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Luigi Mengato/flickr/Creative Commons]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150327.mp3




Robotic materials and a news roundup

Thu, 19 Mar 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Nikolaus Correll discusses the future of robotic materials inspired by nature. Emily Conover discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Nick Dragotta]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150320.mp3




The politics of happiness and a news roundup

Thu, 12 Mar 2015 14:00:00 -0400

Sean Wojcik discusses the relationship between happiness and political ideology. Emily Conover discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Erik Hersman/flickr/CC BY 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150313.mp3




Antimicrobial resistance and a news roundup

Thu, 05 Mar 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Stephen Baker discusses the challenges faced by lower-income countries when fighting antimicrobial resistant infections. Emily Conover discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Merton Wilton/flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150306.mp3




Sexual trait evolution in mosquitoes and a news roundup

Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Sara Mitchell discusses the co-evolution of sexual traits in mosquitoes and their influence on malaria transmission. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Sam Cotton]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150227.mp3




Maternal effects in songbirds and a news roundup

Thu, 19 Feb 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Renée Duckworth discusses the role of maternal effects on species replacement in ecological communities shaped by forest fires. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Alex Badyaev]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150220.mp3




The planetary boundaries framework, marine debris, and a news roundup

Thu, 12 Feb 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Will Steffen discusses the processes that define the planetary boundaries framework: a safe operating space within which humanity can still thrive on earth. Jenna Jambeck examines the factors influencing how much plastic debris a nation contributes to the ocean. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Bo Eide Creative Commons License BY-NC-ND 2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150213.mp3




Spatial neurons and a news roundup

Thu, 05 Feb 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Gyorgy Buzsáki discusses how two types of neurons in the brain's hippocampus work together to map an animal's environment. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Isaac Planas-Sitjà]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150206.mp3




Mathematicians and the NSA and a news roundup

Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0500

John Bohannon discusses the growing rift between mathematicians and the National Security Agency following Edward Snowden's 2013 revelations of massive eavesdropping on U.S. citizens. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Amos Frumkin/Hebrew University Cave Research Center]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150130.mp3




How comets change seasonally and a news roundup

Thu, 22 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Myrtha Hässig discusses variability and heterogeneity of the coma of comet 67P as part of Science's special issue on the Rosetta spacecraft. Meghna Sachdev discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: European Space Agency/Rosetta/NAVCAM]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150123.mp3




High-altitude bird migration and a news roundup

Thu, 15 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Charles Bishop discusses the "roller-coaster" flight strategy of bar-headed geese as they migrate across the Himalayas between their breeding and wintering grounds. Online news editor David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: © Nyambayar Batbayar]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150116.mp3




Deworming buffalo and a news roundup

Thu, 08 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Vanessa Ezenwa discusses the complex relationship between parasitic infections and tuberculosis in African buffalo and what it can tell us about human health. Online news editor David Grimm dicusses coloration in lizards, weighing earth-like planets, and how bears help meadows by eating ants. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Mark Jordahl/Flickr/CC-BY-2.0]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150109.mp3




Measuring MOOCs

Thu, 01 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0500

Justin Reich discusses the brief history of MOOCs and their impact on teaching online and offline. [Img: GARY WATERS/GETTYIMAGES]


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_150102.mp3




Our breakthrough of the year and this year's top news stories

Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:00:00 -0500

Robert Coontz discusses this year's Breakthrough and letting readers have their say. Online news editor David Grimm brings the top news stories of 2014 and takes an audio news quiz. Hosted by Sarah Crespi.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/sciencemag/SciencePodcast_141219.mp3