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Preview: ACM Queue - Development

ACM Queue - Development


Manual Work is a Bug

Wed, 14 Mar 2018 13:36:02 GMT

Every IT team should have a culture of constant improvement - or movement along the path toward the goal of automating whatever the team feels confident in automating, in ways that are easy to change as conditions change. As the needle moves to the right, the team learns from each other's experiences, and the system becomes easier to create and safer to operate. A good team has a structure in place that makes the process frictionless and collaborative

Continuous Delivery Sounds Great, but Will It Work Here?

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 12:47:50 GMT

Continuous delivery is a set of principles, patterns, and practices designed to make deployments predictable, routine affairs that can be performed on demand at any time. This article introduces continuous delivery, presents both common objections and actual obstacles to implementing it, and describes how to overcome them using real-life examples. Continuous delivery is not magic. It's about continuous, daily improvement at all levels of the organization.

DevOps Metrics

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 16:11:00 GMT

Delivering value to the business through software requires processes and coordination that often span multiple teams across complex systems, and involves developing and delivering software with both quality and resiliency. As practitioners and professionals, we know that software development and delivery is an increasingly difficult art and practice, and that managing and improving any process or system requires insights into that system. Therefore, measurement is paramount to creating an effective software value stream. Yet accurate measurement is no easy feat.

Popping Kernels

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 12:59:52 GMT

In a world in which high-performance code continues to be written in a fancy assembler, a.k.a. C, with no memory safety and plenty of other risks, the only recourse is to stick to software engineering basics. Reduce the amount of code in harm's way, keep coupling between subsystems efficient and explicit, and work to provide better tools for the job, such as static code checkers and large suites of runtime tests.

Operational Excellence in April Fools' Pranks

Tue, 05 Dec 2017 11:22:51 GMT

Successful pranks require care and planning. Write a design proposal and a project plan. Involve operations early. If this is a technical change to your website, perform load testing, preferably including a "dark launch" or hidden launch test. Hide the prank behind a feature flag rather than requiring a new software release. Perform a retrospective and publish the results widely. Remember that some of the best pranks require little or no technical changes at all. For example, one could simply summarize the best practices for launching any new feature but write it under the guise of how to launch an April Fools' prank. That would be hilarious.

Metaphors We Compute By

Mon, 24 Jul 2017 16:06:02 GMT

Programmers must be able to tell a story with their code, explaining how they solved a particular problem. Like writers, programmers must know their metaphors. Many metaphors will be able to explain a concept, but you must have enough skill to choose the right one that's able to convey your ideas to future programmers who will read the code. Thus, you cannot use every metaphor you know. You must master the art of metaphor selection, of meaning amplification. You must know when to add and when to subtract. You will learn to revise and rewrite code as a writer does. Once there's nothing else to add or remove, you have finished your work. The problem you started with is now the solution. Is that the meaning you intended to convey in the first place?

Is There a Single Method for the Internet of Things?

Tue, 11 Jul 2017 15:52:52 GMT

The Industrial Internet Consortium predicts the IoT (Internet of Things) will become the third technological revolution after the Industrial Revolution and the Internet Revolution. Its impact across all industries and businesses can hardly be imagined. Existing software (business, telecom, aerospace, defense, etc.) is expected to be modified or redesigned, and a huge amount of new software, solving new problems, will have to be developed. As a consequence, the software industry should welcome new and better methods.

Research for Practice: Technology for UnderservedCommunities; Personal Fabrication

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 13:40:23 GMT

This installment of Research for Practice provides curated reading guides to technology for underserved communities and to new developments in personal fabrication. First, Tawanna Dillahunt describes design considerations and technology for underserved and impoverished communities. Designing for the more than 1.6 billion impoverished individuals worldwide requires special consideration of community needs, constraints, and context. Tawanna's selections span protocols for poor-quality communication networks, community-driven content generation, and resource and public service discovery. Second, Stefanie Mueller and Patrick Baudisch provide an overview of recent advances in personal fabrication (e.g., 3D printers). Their selection covers new techniques for fabricating (and emulating) complex materials (e.g., by manipulating the internal structure of an object), for more easily specifying object shape and behavior, and for human-in-the-loop rapid prototyping. Combined, these two guides provide a fascinating deep dive into some of the latest human-centric computer science research results.

Side Effects, Front and Center!

Wed, 24 May 2017 14:51:02 GMT

We think of computation in terms of its consequences. The big MapReduce job returns a large result. Web interactions display information. Enterprise applications update the database and return an answer. These are the reasons we do our work. What we rarely discuss are the side effects of doing the work we intend. Side effects may be unwanted, or they may actually cause desired behavior at different layers of the system. This column points out some fun patterns to keep in mind as we build and use our systems.

Does Anybody Listen to You?

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 10:03:40 GMT

An idea on its own is not worth much. Just because you think you know a better way to do something, even if you're right, no one is required to care. Making great things happen at work is about more than just being smart. Good ideas succeed or fail depending on your ability to communicate them correctly to the people who have the power to make them happen. When you are navigating an organization, it pays to know whom to talk to and how to reach them. Here is a simple guide to sending your ideas up the chain and actually making them stick. It takes three elements: the right people, the right time, and the right way.