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Preview: The Podagogue

The Podagogue





Updated: 2017-04-16T20:53:54.672+12:00

 



professional resume writer Hi! Thanks for the grea...

2017-04-16T20:53:54.672+12:00

professional resume writer
Hi! Thanks for the great information you have provided! You have touched on crucial points.



I'm glad there are other fans of his writing o...

2016-05-06T22:05:57.281+12:00

I'm glad there are other fans of his writing out there. I've never understood why an author who brought such warmth and originality to the fantasy genre isn't better known. It would be great to see his book available in the ebook formats.



I had most of them at one stage, but sadly sold th...

2013-09-06T20:11:16.373+12:00

I had most of them at one stage, but sadly sold them when I needed some money. I kept The Walrus and the Warwolf though. Wow, that is a rollicking great adventure that I can read again and again. Very funny parts, too. I didn't realize how hard they were to seek out now.



Thanks Dan for voicing this appreciation for we sc...

2012-09-16T21:35:51.072+12:00

Thanks Dan for voicing this appreciation for we scattered fans of this marvellous man's work

Martin Green
Singapore



Nice article, thanks for the information.

2011-03-17T17:14:46.841+13:00

Nice article, thanks for the information.



The voices of so many have to be heard, Dan. I...

2010-10-24T19:57:50.347+13:00

The voices of so many have to be heard, Dan.

I'm a Brit, living in Australia, but my heart is in New Zealand. The cowardly actions of so few must not be allowed to destroy the lives of so many.

Tomorrow I won't be able to protest, but I will be blogging, tweeting and doing everything I can to make my voice heard.

Good luck. Millions are with you all.



Very Clever!

2010-07-05T16:59:27.279+12:00

Very Clever!




2010-05-28T09:13:32.027+12:00

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.



Just started listening to it. So far so good. Hope...

2010-05-23T20:27:23.268+12:00

Just started listening to it. So far so good. Hope the rest lives up to your review.



A living wage is a great goal for a professional w...

2010-03-17T08:25:32.223+13:00

A living wage is a great goal for a professional writer, and while many times that includes publishing deals, I guess that isn't always the case. I'm releasing a new podcast novella soon, and I'm planning on releasing a podcast of the story and adding it to other online sites (podiobooks if possible and others). I also have a follow on novel. Will I release it as a podcast and then hope to turn that in to a print deal? I don't know. I know that I want it published, but as Scott Sigler has shown, self-publishing can be done. It takes a lot of work and support from listeners if you follow his model, but it is possible.
Your question "Does it work?" is best answered with "it depends." It depends on your goals, your story's strength, your audience, and your timing.



Orion - Thanks for the comment, you raise a very v...

2010-03-17T08:08:38.951+13:00

Orion - Thanks for the comment, you raise a very valid point.

Like JC says, a living wage would be the ideal, and is no doubt the goal of every writer, be they published or struggling to get published. Making a living from one's craft is the Holy Grail of writing, and simply getting published is just the first step in what can still be a long, hard road to success - or otherwise. However, it would seem to be a step up from not being published at all.
Of course, there's a whole new argument that comes into play at that point, regarding earning out advances and having a negative sales record and so on, but that's not really the point of this post.

The podcast is a platform, a marketing tool, and potentially a source of income, but at this stage in the market it is a pitifully small one. With the way technology is changing the way we consume fiction, however, it will be very interesting to see how these free models can be adapted to create revenue streams for the content creators.

My perspective above is intended as a macroscopic look at what I, as an individual consumer who has adopted the podcast as my preferred form of consuming media, would be willing to contribute to that revenue stream. I hope that the creators out there who might stop by and read this can take something away from that.



You write 'Several have succeeded (Scott Sigle...

2010-03-17T07:53:34.114+13:00

You write 'Several have succeeded (Scott Sigler, Seth Harwood, Tee Morris, Phil Rossi, Mur Lafferty, Philippa Ballantine, Nathan Lowell, Mark Jeffery, JP Moore, James Melzer and JC Hutchins are just a few of the authors who have gone from podiobook releases to publishing deals), and several more have not.' but is a publishing gig the real measure of success? Or is it, as J.C. Hutchins said four times in his announcement, making a 'living wage'

You do raise several questions about price and generating revenue and it'll be interesting to see how it all plays out.



When it comes to short stories, the trio of Escape...

2010-03-17T07:41:31.770+13:00

When it comes to short stories, the trio of Escape Artist podcasts are taking what I think is the most interesting approach. Their revenue comes from donations, and they actually pay for the stories they air.

So I, the consumer, get the stories for free but the authors are getting paid. Then if I feel like supporting the ongoing efforts of the podcasts, I can donate.



See that's why I'm thinking that for the s...

2010-03-17T07:40:16.820+13:00

See that's why I'm thinking that for the short fiction I'll podcast it for free with chatter and promos and then sell the e-book and uncluttered audio for the cheap. That way you've already heard it and can choose to support individual stories financially in your preferred format. That might also be a good metric for me as to which stories are a "hit" with the audience.

And I totally stole the Smashwords thing from Melzer. ;-)



There seems to be a trend to go that way with a lo...

2010-03-17T07:34:24.368+13:00

There seems to be a trend to go that way with a lot of writers right now, James Melzer with his 99c shorts being the obvious one (in e-pub form, rather than as a podcast, mind you).

My short answer is: Possibly.

I haven't bought either of Melzer's short stories, but I have heard that they are very good, and 99c is nothing, really. The trouble is that I don't have time to sit and read, while I do have time to listen to podcasts in the car or while I'm working with my hands.

On the other hand, short fiction can be a lot more hit and miss, particularly if it is being written, edited and produced by just one set of eyes - the writer's. JR Murdock's tales, which he is currently releasing in podcast form, have been a mixed bag, and of the eight episodes released so far I have only really loved one, and the rest have been OK. So I would be wary of paying, say 99c a pop, if that meant I had spent $8 (that's about $11US) to hear 1 good story.

By comparison, I'm chewing up the Starship Sofa right now. This collaborative model, which involves a vetting process to find the really good stuff, seems to work brilliantly, and I intend to make those guys a worthy donation for all their hard work.

So I suppose the same rule applies; short stories are a different form of story-telling, and as a listener I would need to be shown that the writer has mastered this form as well as the long form before committing cash to the material.



So here's a question, would you buy short fict...

2010-03-17T07:21:44.199+13:00

So here's a question, would you buy short fiction unrelated to an ongoing podcast from a podcaster you trusted, either in audio or e-book form? I plan on releasing short stories starting soon through both my site and Smashwords. There will be various e-reader compatible formats and I could even sell a chatter free audio version through the site as well.



I agree with the Mur Lafferty quote; I don't f...

2010-03-17T01:25:42.233+13:00

I agree with the Mur Lafferty quote; I don't feel entitled to the work of any author or content creator. On the other hand I think it's going to become very difficult for anyone to break into the professional content business without giving most if not all of their stuff away for free the way that Scott Sigler does.

To put the difficulty of making money from popular free content into context, we need to remember that it has always been extremely difficult to make a living as a writer. Like music, writing follows a power law distribution--a tiny minority of writers make a killing off of their content (directly or indirectly), a larger fraction makes a decent living, a much larger fraction makes a mediocre living, and the vast majority of writers cannot make any living at all off of writing.

That's how it has been and how it will always be. Now that the internet and digital technology have made it cheaper to both write words and publish them in a public place, the fraction of people writing who actually make a living off of it will actually be smaller, relative to the much larger number of people now engaging in writing.

So I don't think the question of whether or not most written content--or even most high quality written content--will end up being available for free can be answered by the success or failure of any particular author.

How authors can make a living off of free is another question. I'm more familiar with how webcomic artists are doing it, and I have to think that it's only a matter of time before writers follow a similar path. Again, only a minority of writers will be able to do it at all.

Great post. I think the whole community around podcast novels, from writers to readers, has felt the shockwaves from J. C. Hutchins' recent announcement.



Excellent post. It makes you think because I have ...

2010-03-16T22:52:12.896+13:00

Excellent post.
It makes you think because I have considered producing podcast fiction of some of my stories.

You are quite correct - a body of work is important, published or not.

Neil




2010-02-10T21:09:51.649+13:00

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Thanks!!! Bigtime.

2010-02-08T17:58:29.913+13:00

Thanks!!! Bigtime.




2010-01-20T19:58:14.018+13:00

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.



Hey! Thanks for the blurb, Dan! :) It's alway...

2009-12-02T01:44:40.206+13:00

Hey! Thanks for the blurb, Dan! :)

It's always gratifying to hear that people are still finding QS and still enjoying it. It's overdue for a revision, I think, and I'm hoping the dead-tree versions will be available first quarter 2010.

Fingers crossed and thanks again!



Just a quick little addition to your very well don...

2009-11-29T19:07:18.778+13:00

Just a quick little addition to your very well done review. I've spoken with Jeremy Shipp, and will be giving away a personally inscribed copy of his book on Dec 4th. The Same day his story "Sin Earth" is made available on the podcast. The contest began today but it's not to late to get in on the fun. Check my podcast website for more details. www.shadowpress.wordpress.com



OOPS, meant to post this: http://www.writerunboxed...

2009-10-31T03:06:26.711+13:00

OOPS, meant to post this:
http://www.writerunboxed.com/2009/10/29/guerilla-writing/



Thank you for the mention. These are all great wor...

2009-10-30T13:49:15.678+13:00

Thank you for the mention. These are all great works of fiction and great podcast novels as well. Everyone listed deserves the best. Keep up the great work and thank you for the kind words. :)