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Comments for Great War Fiction





Last Build Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 20:37:15 +0000

 



Comment on The Return of the Brute by Roger

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 20:37:15 +0000

By all accounts Maclaren-Ross was constitutionally incapable of not embellishing a story.



Comment on The Return of the Brute by George Simmers

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 13:42:59 +0000

In Julian Maclaren-Ross's Memoirs of the Forties, he tells a story of O'Flaherty going into the Accounts Department of his publishers 'wanting ten pounds cash and if it wasn't immediately forthcoming he'd tap his raincoat pocket and say "I've got a gun in here." The accountants usually forked out, not that there were any royalties due.' Does anyone know if this is a true story, or one embellished by Maclaren-Ross?



Comment on Are Poppies Racist? by basicfolds

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 23:20:12 +0000

I fell out with the Royal British Legion many years ago, following arguments about how they assessed the "deservingness" of ex-servicemen and have refused to wear a red poppy since. I like to choose which charities I contribute to, rather than feed the RBL's monopoly on remembrance. I still occasionally buy a white poppy if I see one available. They seem rarer than they used to be.



Comment on Arf a mo, Kaiser! by Vintage Toronto Ads Goes to War – Jamie Bradburn's Tales of Toronto

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 15:11:47 +0000

[…] soldier depicted in this ad was created by cartoonist Bert Thomas for a similar campaign across the Atlantic for the Weekly Dispatch newspaper in November 1914. The image of a Cockney […]



Comment on Are Poppies Racist? by George Simmers

Sun, 05 Nov 2017 15:09:34 +0000

I've never been so keen on the white poppies. Whereas the red ones are designedly non-political (though some may find political meanings in them) the white poppies are a deliberate political statement, and an atempt to make the red ones look political. I can't see an equivalence between the two, since sale of the red poppies finances care for disabled and needy ex-servicemen, while funds from selling white ones just go to subsidising pacifist enterprises.



Comment on Are Poppies Racist? by janevarley

Sun, 05 Nov 2017 14:34:28 +0000

I have white poppies as well (and have been told off for wearing those). I tend to wear both the red and the white (if I do at all). The red to remember the carnage of the past and the white in hope of a more peaceful future. But, looking to the world I see my white poppy deeply stained with streaks of red. What do the Germans and French do?



Comment on Are Poppies Racist? by Alan Allport

Sun, 05 Nov 2017 13:44:33 +0000

I could take the Daily Mail’s complaining about the poppy being politicized more seriously if it and other reactionary rags hadn’t so clumsily sought to appropriate it as a symbol for themselves and their own values.



Comment on Are Poppies Racist? by Paul Norman

Sun, 05 Nov 2017 13:15:30 +0000

Interesting piece and news to me. Sounds like the poppy has been highjacked. Well, I always wear a poppy out of respect. And I loathe war and would never glorify it.



Comment on Owen Rhoscomyl by Roger

Sun, 05 Nov 2017 12:18:36 +0000

"It’s almost readable" This is now my second favourite piece of criticism. My favourite is still Lewis Carroll's view of Wuthering Heights: "It is of all novels I ever read the one I should least like to be a character in myself."



Comment on Handheld Press by George Simmers

Thu, 26 Oct 2017 22:09:18 +0000

'The Secret of the League' was a later abridged edition of the book. This edition restores it to its original length, apparently.