Subscribe: Comments for Karen Blakeman's Blog
http://www.rba.co.uk/wordpress/comments/feed/
Preview: Comments for Karen Blakeman's Blog

Comments for Karen Blakeman's Blog



News and comments on search tools and electronic resources for research



Last Build Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2017 10:24:26 +0000

 









Comment on Google makes it harder to change location for country specific research by Eric Sieverts

Sun, 29 Oct 2017 11:50:57 +0000

Would adding the parameter &gl=no to the result URL, still do the job?



Comment on Google makes it harder to change location for country specific research by Karen Blakeman

Sun, 29 Oct 2017 11:38:42 +0000

Yes, David, I really should have included that in the possible strategies. Thanks for reminding me. It works well for this particular example (Norway) and gives good but slightly different results and will, of course, miss Norwegian sites that are registered as .com or other international domains. The amount of overlap (or lack of it) will vary depending on the country.



Comment on Google makes it harder to change location for country specific research by David Pearson

Sun, 29 Oct 2017 11:01:32 +0000

How does this compare to using the "site:No" syntax to force Google to only return result from .No domains. https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=100&ei=oLL1WeX8NYPtaKS9k4AP&btnG=Search&q=site%3Ano+brexit



Comment on New Creative Commons image search – back to the drawing board I’m afraid by Neue CC-Bildersuche (Beta) | digithek blog

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 15:36:37 +0000

[…] Update vom 10.2.2017, Karen Blakeman’s Blog: New Creative Commons image search – back to the drawing board I’m afraid […]



Comment on More Google weird results by Rob Feenstra

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 09:24:46 +0000

Best solution: learn Dutch. This is the best * on the internet only results in 3 hits on google.nl, but when I repeat the search in Dutch (dit is de beste * op het internet) I get 158.000.000 results. Lucky me/gelukkige ik!



Comment on More Google weird results by Arthur Weiss

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 21:14:46 +0000

I think Google is confused because most of the words are stop words. (Not sure about "internet" - always thought it was but not on the lists I just looked at which are mostly old, but probably still valid to an extent). Google has coded for known phrases with stop words e.g. "to be or not to be" but this search was not that sort of phrase. So I wonder if what is happening is that Google is confused as it doesn't know what words to actually include and which ones to ignore in its algorithm. You can test this by missing out words. I tried ["this is the best" * "on the internet"] and got 15 results. "this is the " * "on the internet" gave 19 results "this is the best" * "on the" gave 14 results as did "this is the best * on the" "this is the * on the" gave 40 results ["is the * on the" internet] gave 54 results ["is the * on the" planet] gave a number of 588m BUT only 111 were shown (although there was the option to see the rest!) Planet alone gave 754m results so around 30% more. [* "the planet"] gave 460m - with several pages of results. ["the best * the planet"] gave 206m with several result pages BUT ["is the best * the planet"] went down to 89 and ["this is the best * the planet"] gave only 13 results. So if I'm right, and it's stop words, it's an extra thing to include in search training.



Comment on Seasonal opening times – never trust Google’s answers (or Bing’s) by Google shop times might not be right | Web Search Guide and Internet News

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 06:20:43 +0000

[…] occurred to me – but Karen Blakeman has posted this advice – SEASONAL OPENING TIMES – NEVER TRUST GOOGLE’S ANSWERS (OR BING’S) (Dec 29) – information about open and closed times of shops might not be right – always […]



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by How to write totally misleading headlines for social media

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 02:45:42 +0000

[…] has written a telling piece on her blog  with the example of this  newspaper article From Karen: How to write totally misleading headlines for social media :  Or how to seriously annoy intelligent people by telling deliberate […]



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by Karen Blakeman

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 12:53:16 +0000

I don't think we can blame Facebook for the misuse of the tags. They provide the technology and alternative social media titles usually do describe at least part of the original content, and the target audience maybe different compared with that for a website audience. In this case it has to be the Independent that is ultimately responsible, even if the title was written by a freelancer or contractor who, I presume, are paid by the Independent. It is clearly in the source code of the page on the Independent website, therefore they are responsible for it.



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by Chris Armtrong

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 10:23:04 +0000

But the conclusion must be that The Independent, and not Facebook, is in the wrong here. (Although I suppose there could / should be an FB algorithm to prioritise the real title?)



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by Karen Blakeman

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 07:56:58 +0000

Can't really say, Justin, without knowing how the Independent manages its content and social media presence. I have had two very interesting private conversations with a web content manager and a PR/social media consultant neither of whom, I hasten to add, work for The Independent. Both said that pressure is put on them to get as many "shares" and click throughs as possible. One confirmed that some of their clients clearly state in the commissioning briefs that titles are changed for social media to increase the click rate and that their performance is assessed and payments adjusted accordingly.



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by Justin Bowles

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 01:58:37 +0000

So who wrote the code to give the alternative (and misleading) headline unique to Facebook?



Comment on How to write totally misleading headlines for social media by Karen Blakeman

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 16:06:33 +0000

I assumed that someone had somehow altered the headline when sharing but when I tested it myself to see how I could do it I realised that there was more to it. And you are right, Vicky, we all have to check what is appearing in our posts when we share even a link to an original article and delete it if it is not what we thought we were sharing. All very depressing.