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People and the environment through history



Last Build Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2017 04:26:45 +0000

 



Comment on Weeds – the great European invasion by Cmur

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 04:26:45 +0000

It's worth noting though, that Richard Taylor records a whakataukī in 1855 that goes: Tēnā te ringa tango parahia (that is the hand that pulls weeds: said of a hard worker). A bit of googling shows that parahia is probably either Chenopodium allanii or Dysphania pusilla. I'd say that shows there was at least one weed in pre-European times (though it could be an imported European attitude).



Comment on Publications by envirohistorynz

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 23:20:35 +0000

Hi Victoria, Thanks for being in touch. Sure thing - I will email it to you. Catherine



Comment on Publications by Victoria Leroy

Wed, 27 Sep 2017 21:58:41 +0000

Dear Dr. Knight, I came across your blog while searching for sources for my master thesis. I have been writing about current Japanese nationalism and culturalism, and now I'm getting more and more interested in studying their impact on environmentalism and conservation. Would it be possible to read your 2004 thesis “Veneration or Destruction? Japanese ambivalence to nature, with special reference to nature conservation” ? This would be immensely helpful to me. Thank you so much in advance ! - Victoria Leroy (Graduate student in East-Asian Studies, ENS Lyon, France)



Comment on When did the moa become extinct? by Terence Munro

Sun, 13 Aug 2017 09:56:02 +0000

David Attenborough in his documentary at London's museum of Natural History went into great detail about the Moa. While he described it's main predator the Haast eagle, he made no mention of the Maoris arrival circa 1400 or of their overhunting that led to it going extinct within the next two hundred years. Later he describes the Dodo, a flightless extinct bird whose last confirmed sighting was circa 1690. Now my problem is this - why did he describe the Dodo as being the first bird forced into extinction by modern humans, when clearly this is not the case and why did he not mention the arrival of the Maori in NZ as the main contributing factor leading to the Moa's extinction?



Comment on Wharenui: telling stories of people and place by Migal

Sat, 22 Jul 2017 09:28:14 +0000

Kaitiakitanga means guardianship, preservation, conservation, fostering, protecting, sheltering -because of matauranga maori, and whakapapa to the whenua. By no means does it mean stewardship as defined in the RMA. Only the tangata whenua can be kaitiaki, the rest are conservationalists. At no disrespect, but because pakeha and others do not have the same belief system as Maori, the term kaitiakitanga is not held within their belief system. Being kaitiaki runs deep within who we are as maori, our history, belief system and culture.



Comment on ‘Playing god’ – 1837 and 2017 by AnitaTa

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 17:39:24 +0000

Can you not, like, hunt them-castrate-release? Sounds like you could make a program for vet school students (supplementary income).



Comment on Maori gardening in pre-European NZ by envirohistorynz

Sat, 01 Jul 2017 06:46:36 +0000

Hi Natalie, have you read Bee Dawson's "A history of gardening in New Zealand"? That may have the answers to your questions. Also Te Ara Online Encyclopedia of NZ is often a good source of this sort of information, including lists of other useful sources. Good luck! Catherine @ envirohistoryNZ



Comment on Maori gardening in pre-European NZ by Natalie Leary

Sat, 01 Jul 2017 06:41:53 +0000

I am interested how kumera was grown in the sth island considering the cold weather. Some say stones were used to keep the heat in. I have visualised this in a number of ways. Does anyone know how? I also have many questions about traditional maori planting. One at a time.



Comment on ‘Playing god’ – 1837 and 2017 by tessawhiteman

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:15:30 +0000

Well said. Of course, the slow killing chemical protects other animals and birds. It may not be painful for the possum. What did you end up choosing?



Comment on Opiki toll bridge: graceful relic of a thriving flax industry by envirohistorynz

Wed, 07 Jun 2017 00:06:07 +0000

That is great that you remember going over the bridge as a child. My guess would be wooden planks suspended on the vertical wires? I vaguely remember reading this when researching Ravaged Beauty. Molly Aker's book will give you the answer to this though. envirohistoryNZ



Comment on Opiki toll bridge: graceful relic of a thriving flax industry by jaspersdoggyworld

Tue, 23 May 2017 06:33:22 +0000

I can remember going over this bridge as a very young child. We live in Palmerston North. For some reason, I remember the road over the bridge as brick or tiles. Would that be correct?



Comment on More about seasonal change (fungi) by Autumn in the Pohangina Valley – envirohistory NZ

Tue, 16 May 2017 00:41:00 +0000

[…] See also: The influence of seasons on culture and environmental perceptions; More about seasonal change (fungi) […]



Comment on The influence of seasons on culture and environmental perceptions by Autumn in the Pohangina Valley – envirohistory NZ

Tue, 16 May 2017 00:40:59 +0000

[…] also: The influence of seasons on culture and environmental perceptions; More about seasonal change […]



Comment on Life changes by envirohistorynz

Mon, 15 May 2017 18:43:57 +0000

Ha yes, we are getting a shipping container!



Comment on Life changes by David Neufeld

Mon, 15 May 2017 16:54:00 +0000

Look forward to your posts from the new digs. Rural and bush settings have been our choice for most of our adult lives. Can't claim we've completely escaped the bad habit of acquiring things - too easy to knock up a shed. Enjoy you settling in.



Comment on Life changes by Ro Scott

Mon, 15 May 2017 09:28:51 +0000

Looks great - I'm struggling to de-clutter my home without downsizing ... maybe it's the only way! I hope you love living there!



Comment on A tale of mining in New Zealand – and the tragic tailings of Tui Mine by envirohistorynz

Thu, 11 May 2017 18:26:06 +0000

Thank you for this update, Claire. Really good to know.



Comment on A tale of mining in New Zealand – and the tragic tailings of Tui Mine by Claire Ashton

Thu, 11 May 2017 00:19:44 +0000

Have attended an update on tui mine remedial work, at a MPDC meeting. Lead scientist says 30-70 years to continue decontaminating. Aerial lime applied, and also blocked tunnels need lime applied every few years. Iron floc ( ferrous oxide ) continues to leach into tunakohoia straw, especially, tui stream less so, with a 75 % water quality improvement...



Comment on Is there such a thing as a natural disaster? The lessons of environmental history by Brooke W

Thu, 04 May 2017 17:38:10 +0000

Interesting view, never thought of natural disaster not actually being natural but this makes a ton of sense. Thanks for your perspective. I'm going to share some other posts i saw about natural disasters to see if you agree with them: Natural Disasters Essay



Comment on Did you know moreporks mewed? by envirohistorynz

Sat, 29 Apr 2017 19:27:01 +0000

Nice to hear from you David. I heard from one person who was reading the book in a plane, and as she looked up from the part about the Manawatu River, she glanced out the window and there the Manawatu was in its fully, meandering glory! Best wishes Catherine



Comment on Did you know moreporks mewed? by David Neufeld

Sat, 29 Apr 2017 17:07:57 +0000

Good morning Catherine, Enjoyed your intersection of early morning coffee, work and easy distraction into the world around you. Picked up your 'Rivers' whilst visiting our three young grandsons in Akaroa earlier this year, beautifully produced volume. Looking forward to a summer river trip in June to read it in an appropriate environment. Cheers, David



Comment on When is a lake not a lake? The case of Lake Karapiro by Pam Vernon

Fri, 07 Apr 2017 03:49:32 +0000

Art works focusing on the loss of a village with the dam construction http://waikatomuseum.co.nz/exhibitions-and-events/view/41



Comment on Irish potato famine memorial by Anonymous

Wed, 05 Apr 2017 23:36:45 +0000

There is a breathtaking memorial in one of the parks in Dublin. Well worth investigating.



Comment on The town that lost its river: the sad story of Piriharakeke by William McGregor

Tue, 04 Apr 2017 03:37:10 +0000

My generation was the last to swim from the shores of Foxton (township) over to Matakarapa in the early 1960's! Harbour Street was our "natural play-ground" for swimming/fishing and working in teams on the mudflats of Matakarapa (putting our arms down the "eel-holes" to flush out the "Tuna") were great memories .....



Comment on What is a groyne? (And what’s it got to do with environmental history?) by Denny Anker

Sat, 31 Dec 2016 03:28:02 +0000

P.S. Thomas Claridge died aged 76 in 1928



Comment on What is a groyne? (And what’s it got to do with environmental history?) by Denny Anker

Sat, 31 Dec 2016 03:25:48 +0000

I understand from his published obituary that my great-grandfather, Thomas Claridge, who farmed in northern Christchurch, was involved with establishing the original groynes on the Otukaikino Creek. The Otukaikino, once the south branch of the Waimakariri River, was separated from the main branch during the course of major works in the 1930’s. and presumably these are the works referred to above.



Comment on Why were stoats and ferrets introduced to New Zealand? by Anja D.

Sun, 18 Dec 2016 12:09:27 +0000

nice and informative post



Comment on The city of hidden lagoons: Palmerston (of the north) by Anonymous

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 07:38:06 +0000

That's all I know - from family tree. My father was Ernest George Davey, born in Bulls 1917 and brought up in Sanson.



Comment on Why write about rivers? by Celia Wilson

Sun, 13 Nov 2016 23:01:00 +0000

I am part of art exhibition next July concerning braided rivers and migratory birds and to be held in two north island galleries and in the South Island at Arts in Oxford & organised by printmaker Celia Walker. Should be good. The gallery is also hold workshops and talks.



Comment on Why write about rivers? by envirohistorynz

Sat, 12 Nov 2016 18:11:10 +0000

Many thanks for the congratulations David - and good luck on your book too. You should be able to track down the book in 'all good bookstores', including Whitcoulls. Will be interested to hear your thoughts.



Comment on New Zealand’s Rivers launch – 17 November by paulknight35

Sat, 12 Nov 2016 02:47:19 +0000

Best wishes for the launch. I'm sure it will go well!



Comment on Why write about rivers? by David Neufeld

Sat, 12 Nov 2016 02:36:26 +0000

Congratulations on completing and releasing your new book Catherine. I've been working on a Yukon River mss. for years but so far just articles. I am looking forward to getting my hands on your book, back in your land in a month. Cheers, David



Comment on Ravaged Beauty by Why write about rivers? – envirohistory NZ

Sat, 12 Nov 2016 02:15:27 +0000

[…] Ravaged Beauty […]



Comment on Papaitonga – hidden jewel of Horowhenua by Kāpiti Coast Biomimicry Workshop | BiomimicrySwarm Australia

Tue, 01 Nov 2016 08:08:55 +0000

[…] Papaitonga wetland. Photo: Paul Knight https://envirohistorynz.com/2009/12/06/papaitonga-hidden-jewel-of-horowhenua/ […]



Comment on The city of hidden lagoons: Palmerston (of the north) by envirohistorynz

Sat, 22 Oct 2016 17:52:18 +0000

Thank you for sharing that, Alan. That is rather sad - especially as it no longer exists anymore. I had no idea anyone had drowned in the lagoon - do you know the circumstances?



Comment on The city of hidden lagoons: Palmerston (of the north) by Alan Davey

Fri, 21 Oct 2016 06:12:13 +0000

My Great Great Uncle, George Ernest Davey, drowned in the Awapuni Lagoon 14 January 1894 aged 18.



Comment on New book: New Zealand’s Rivers by envirohistorynz

Tue, 23 Aug 2016 08:08:41 +0000

Thank you for the support, Hasfeetwillwalk! :-)



Comment on New book: New Zealand’s Rivers by hasfeetwillwalk

Tue, 23 Aug 2016 06:46:53 +0000

Reblogged this on hasfeetwillwalk and commented: Looking forward to reading this



Comment on Maori gardening in pre-European NZ by Kumera King

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 13:25:00 +0000

No mention of the kumera variety? The big purple/red variety in NZ, came via an American whaling Captain in the early to mid 1800s who brought sweet potatoe from Bolivia/Peru on way to NZ. Before that, the kumera variety was quite small slightly larger than thumb size .... A bit like an Aussie Kippler potatoe. The sudden introduction of the larger kumera type, radically changed Maori crop farming in a positive way. It boomed!!



Comment on envirohistory NZ lives on! (but somewhere else) by envirohistorynz

Sat, 25 Jun 2016 01:21:09 +0000

Thank you David - I am looking forward to it too! :-)



Comment on envirohistory NZ lives on! (but somewhere else) by David Neufeld

Fri, 24 Jun 2016 21:14:00 +0000

Look forward to your NZ rivers book.



Comment on Coal mine at Burnetts Face, Denniston by Anonymous

Fri, 24 Jun 2016 04:47:52 +0000

Mike Walsh please contact me at davidmartin231@hotmail.com simular story



Comment on Coal mine at Burnetts Face, Denniston by David

Fri, 24 Jun 2016 00:57:46 +0000

Would that happen to be Alfred Herbert ?



Comment on Opiki toll bridge: graceful relic of a thriving flax industry by envirohistorynz

Wed, 18 May 2016 04:17:22 +0000

Hi Ted, Looking at the Historic Places Trust entry about this site: http://www.heritage.org.nz/the-list/details/9619, the bridge remains appear to be on private property, and so there is no direct public access (at least without gaining permission first). But there is a plaque by the roadside and you can get a reasonably good view from there.



Comment on Opiki toll bridge: graceful relic of a thriving flax industry by Ted Fecteau

Mon, 16 May 2016 21:43:47 +0000

Is it possible to visit the current bridge site just to have a mosey? I have always looked from afar with curiosity when passing. I find this story quite interesting.



Comment on Weeds – the great European invasion by envirohistorynz

Mon, 09 May 2016 02:25:47 +0000

Thank you for the comment, Meaningoftrees! Yes, it is a salutary reminder that what we regard as a reality is often very relative (and culturally-embedded). You have a great website too - all the best with the research.



Comment on Weeds – the great European invasion by meaningoftrees

Sun, 08 May 2016 08:46:56 +0000

A really interesting read! Interesting dialogue about what constitutes a weed and the different cultural perspectives of Japanese and Maori. It does seem like whether something is a "weed" or not depends a lot on your own perspective and what you value. And theres a lot of variability too - Some "weeds" are fairly benign and have a range of great attributes while other "weeds" can irrevocably destroy the structure and function of native forest ecosystems.



Comment on A Kapiti environmental history – Nga Manu Nature Reserve by A new site: Ngā Manu Nature Reserve - Schickedanz Design Studio

Tue, 03 May 2016 01:39:24 +0000

[…] While working on this project we came to know what a special place of ecological significance this reserve really is: the last remnant of a huge coastal swamp forest of Kapiti Coast (https://envirohistorynz.com/2009/11/16/a-kapiti-environmental-history-nga-manu-nature-reserve/). […]



Comment on Author by Jan

Mon, 02 May 2016 22:39:59 +0000

Dear Envirohistorynz, Thanks for your site. I enjoyed reading about Bill Clarksons review of The Nature Study Pioneers( pdf) I would like to access it again as I am creating an exhibition called The Nature Table. The PDF seems to be corrupted just coming up as gobbledygook letters.. this may be my computer but wonder if you could check it. Thanks Jan



Comment on A history of environmental history in New Zealand by Victorian America Celebrates Arbor Day – Kristin Holt

Fri, 29 Apr 2016 06:25:49 +0000

[…] Group of children and adults outside Rata School on Arbor Day, 1 August 1894, Ohingaiti district (Rangitikei). Taken by Edward George Child. Alexander Turnbull Library ref. ID: 1/1-011003-G. [source] […]