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Page F30



Space, science, language learning, history, human progress



Updated: 2017-10-01T18:29:42.983+09:00

 



My new project: daily Belle Epoque stuff

2017-08-13T16:44:39.045+09:00

I think it's been almost half a year since my last post. In the meantime I was busy with finally getting around to getting a formal university degree, and doing it at quite a rapid pace. It's finally done and I can get back to other things now. One of them is an outlet for my Belle Epoque fascination. After translating the first third of Jules Huret's l'Allemagne Moderne I gave some thought as(image)



App to build Korean vocabulary with hanja

2017-02-03T05:21:24.095+09:00

I haven't installed this app to try it out but it looks like just my type: Korean doesn't but also does use hanja, and a knowledge of maybe 100 of them plus the way they work in the language is probably essential for true fluency. A lot of Koreans themselves misunderstand them: I heard one the other day explaining the 문 in 백문불여일견 as 文 instead of 聞 (which still does make sense but is (image)



TedX speech in Scots on Scots

2016-12-29T13:01:48.543+09:00

Interesting video here from TedX all in Scots and about Scots. The guy giving the speech is a neuroscientist and talks about how the brain reacts differently to an L1 vs. an L2, even if the two are really close. In this case they are close enough that you should be able to understand most of it, and even more so if you know another Germanic language. Check out 14:32 or so for example where he (image)



Clozemaster is quite addictive

2016-11-13T03:43:42.549+09:00

For the past few weeks I've been playing a lot of Clozemaster, an 8-bit style language learning game that is quite simple yet ends up being quite effective thanks to the new text input mode. The way the site works is this: it takes all the sentences from Tatoeba.org, matches them up from language to language, and then turns it into a game where you fill in the missing word. Multiple choice is (image)



Wort der Woche (Deutsche Welle)

2016-11-03T04:11:19.100+09:00

Deutsche Welle's Wort der Woche is a little-known but great resource for the history behind a lot of German words and expressions, which after almost a decade has amassed quite the large number of terms. Arschkarte (the red card in football/soccer) is a particularly good one. Apparently it's so named because before TVs had colour the referee had to carry the two cards in different places so the (image)



Suddenly understanding a German joke

2016-10-08T05:54:30.483+09:00

One of my favourite scenes from the Lernen to Talk Show, where a student tells Mickey "Egal wie dicht du bist, Goethe war Dichter" and after 50 seconds of hearing it explained and thinking about it he suddenly gets the joke. (image)



Page F30 is now ad free

2016-10-06T16:43:11.527+09:00

I just received an automated warning from AdSense instructing me to make changes to the site because of possible: False claims of downloadable or streaming content Linking to content that does not exist Redirecting users to irrelevant and/or misleading webpages Text on a page unrelated to the topic and/or business model of the website. and to "please remove ads from the violating pages", and (image)



Don't be afraid of my book

2016-09-16T05:26:33.798+09:00

I learned a great number of things from translating the first part of Jules Huret's l'Allemagne Moderne from French to English last year. Translating is an entirely different world compared to just reading a book, as you are essentially creating a new one and everything has to be checked. Without looking into what an author writes about in great detail it's impossible to translate a book with any(image)



Lingq just got a lot better

2016-08-06T06:38:29.745+09:00

I just noticed today that Lingq.com now has a new interface, which is nice to see as its script-heavy and kind of early 2000s web 2.0-type design was its weakest point. There are also some new features that I'm still exploring but my favourite one so far is the ability to display traditional characters above simplified ones when choosing Mandarin. It ends up looking like this: (image)



Tim Kaine speaking Spanish

2016-07-23T13:28:10.125+09:00

Since he was chosen for VP on the Democratic ticket today, and one of his qualities is being able to speak Spanish, the next question is going to be how well he speaks it. The answer: quite well. In this video he starts at 50 seconds. And 1 minute in in this video. Sometimes with someone who "speaks Spanish" you get that really heavy English accent accompanying it (think Bloomberg, very (image)



America in 1911: Part 6

2016-06-08T01:19:21.067+09:00

Part 6 and final part of Jules Huret's l'Amérique Moderne. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 Mr. Roosevelt. -- The former President of the United States is a broad-minded politician and a talented writer at the same time. His administration was particularly brilliant and brought him much esteem. Mr. Roosevelt the politician is an ardent orator, affluent, energetic and (image)



America in 1911: Part 5

2016-06-08T01:22:25.797+09:00

Part 5 (images 401 to 500) of Jules Huret's l'Amérique Moderne, published in 1911. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 Chicago. Mouth of the river. -- Chicago is crossed by a river that enters the lake at the north of the city. Grain elevators can be seen on its banks crowded with boats. The skyscrapers of Chicago. -- Chicago is New York's rival with a jealousy for its (image)



America in 1911: Part 4

2016-06-08T01:22:03.460+09:00

Part 4 (images 301 to 400) of Jules Huret's l'Amérique Moderne, published in 1911. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 University of Stanford. The Library. -- Not as rich in documents as the one in Berkeley, it still has 75,000 volumes and 22,000 brochures. Its reading room can hold 300 people. Tacoma. The harbor. -- A manufacturing city with more than 40,000 inhabitants, (image)



America in 1911: Part 3

2016-06-08T01:22:00.287+09:00

Part 3 (images 201 to 300) of Jules Huret's l'Amérique Moderne, published in 1911. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 Stenography. -- On large American trains one can write and even dictate letters. A stenographer is always at the service of a traveler to receive his mail that is then sent off at the first stop. The dining room. -- This photograph gives an idea of the (image)



America in 1911: Part 2

2016-06-08T01:21:58.920+09:00

Part 2 (images 101 to 200) of Jules Huret's l'Amérique Moderne, published in 1911. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 A review at the Capitol, in Washington. -- Though in general not very inclined to the military profession, the American enjoys military parades from which he draws his unwavering confidence in the future of his country. West Point. The Library. -- The (image)



America in 1911: part 1

2016-06-08T01:21:55.844+09:00

I spent a few weeks gathering and translating the pictures of Jules Huret's l'Allemagne Moderne showing Germany just before World War I, which proved to be as well-received as I had hoped. Jules Huret has another book that can be found on Archive.org that is of the exact same format called l'Amérique Moderne, showing the United States as he visited it just before. Since it is from the same era (image)



494 images of Germany just before World War I - part 4

2016-05-06T16:35:04.020+09:00

During the early 1900s a French journalist named Jules Huret spent a number of years in Germany, and published two books in 1912 and 1913 based on his reports sent back to Le Figaro. The way he described being in the country is so riveting that you almost feel as if you are there with him, seeing Germany as it was during the very last moments of Europe's long period of peace. As the book is in (image)



494 images of Germany just before World War I - part 3

2016-05-06T16:34:13.467+09:00

During the early 1900s a French journalist named Jules Huret spent a number of years in Germany, and published two books in 1912 and 1913 based on his reports sent back to Le Figaro. The way he described being in the country is so riveting that you almost feel as if you are there with him, seeing Germany as it was during the very last moments of Europe's long period of peace. As the book is in (image)



494 images of Germany just before World War I - part 2

2016-05-13T02:02:45.990+09:00

During the early 1900s a French journalist named Jules Huret spent a number of years in Germany, and published two books in 1912 and 1913 based on his reports sent back to Le Figaro. The way he described being in the country is so riveting that you almost feel as if you are there with him, seeing Germany as it was during the very last moments of Europe's long period of peace. As the book is in (image)



494 images of Germany just before World War I - part 1

2016-05-09T07:27:32.960+09:00

During the early 1900s a French journalist named Jules Huret spent a number of years in Germany, and published two books in 1912 and 1913 based on his reports sent back to Le Figaro. The way he described being in the country is so riveting that you almost feel as if you are there with him, seeing Germany as it was during the very last moments of Europe's long period of peace. As the book is in (image)



My Korean after 15 years

2016-04-26T01:40:50.448+09:00

It's been 15 years since I first learned Korean, and 13-14 since I've known it to fluency, and since then I haven't spent a day without spending at least a few hours using it. When learning a language you not only learn a language but also create your own way of speaking it, in the same way you do with any other language including your first one, and I thought it would be interesting to jot down (image)



How to avoid boredom when repeatedly listening to audio

2016-03-18T05:13:03.092+09:00

Repetition is very important when learning a language. Repetition is very important. Repetition is very important. The problem is that your mind doesn't always agree, especially when you are already somewhat proficient in a language. Once you've read and listened to a text once or twice that you completely or mostly understand you are now completely bored by it, and when listening to it again (image)



New pictures of Occator coming soon

2016-03-02T08:39:25.080+09:00

At long last, we're very close to getting pictures of Occator (the crater with the bright spots on Ceres) from Dawn's current and closest orbit. Mark Rayman's Dawn Journal goes over the mission in February in general, and in a comment below he said the folllowing: Marc Rayman: 03/01/2016 03:43 CST ChrisMan and Franklin: I appreciate your interest in Occator, and I understand your eagerness. We (image)



How many Italians live in Canada?

2016-02-28T06:10:30.693+09:00

I found a page here that has some numbers for some of Canada's larger cities, according to which: Le statistiche dell’AIRE del 2008, percio’ recentissime, dicono che gli iscritti italiani sono 121.000 così ripartiti: 62.564 a Toronto – 35.232 a Montreal – 18.902 a Vancouver e 4793 ad Ottawa. Assuming we're talking about metropolitan areas here, that gives us the following ratio: Toronto: 62,564(image)



The countries in Southeast Asia on the US's radar

2016-02-22T03:46:40.781+09:00

This article on Obama's courting (for lack of a better word) countries in China's periphery is a short but good read, and lists the countries themselves: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam. Adding to that a few of the US's existing allies in the region (map made thanks to this site) and you can see how uncomfortably close (image)