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Preview: Comments on Arbogast on Film: Mini Arbo Pop-ups for Groundhog Day

Comments on Arbogast on Film: Mini Arbo Pop-ups for Groundhog Day





Updated: 2017-09-08T08:28:59.712-07:00

 



I liked Sunshine Cleaning...but boy...I felt like ...

2010-02-15T20:30:11.050-08:00

I liked Sunshine Cleaning...but boy...I felt like they got towards the end and didn't know what to do, so they wrapped it up and forgot about characters. I really felt there were some stories that were unfinished when the credits rolled. Otherwise, great movie up until that point. I was really drawn to the characters and the performances.



I think the term gains value with stuff that is on...

2010-02-04T14:42:06.943-08:00

I think the term gains value with stuff that is only of its time - a good example for me would be something like I Love You, Alice B. Toklas, which seems to have been written in a kind of condemnatory vein about the way society was turning and yet doesn't really offer an alternative. It's too mired in its own viewpoint, it mocks rather than satirizes, at the loss of an appreciable layer of depth. More insightful movies transcend their vintage.



I like Putney Swope but you could probably guess t...

2010-02-04T14:39:15.653-08:00

I like Putney Swope but you could probably guess that already. My favorite thing about it is the mock commercials that appear within the film.

I've never really understood the term "dated." It works for me on rare occasions and I've even used it myself but most everything (films, music, literature, etc.) is a product of their times. I like to view films on their own terms. Warts and all. Even when it obvious what decade they were made in and what personal, political and social concerns were prevalent. But I know I'm probably in the minority.



Slither is one of the rare horror movies in which ...

2010-02-03T07:33:30.191-08:00

Slither is one of the rare horror movies in which profanity actually augmented the sense of panic and chaos rather than force the issue or ramp up a tension that isn't there, as seems to be the case in most modern horror movies. The harsh language even extended to the closing theme song, which gave me a final laugh going out the door.



...the problem that I have with both SLITHER and E...

2010-02-03T06:04:08.001-08:00

...the problem that I have with both SLITHER and EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS is the penchant both scripts have to sacrifice an emotional relationship with their characters for "camp" comedy...

Perhaps, but SLITHER did have the line "Dr. Pepper is my favorite kind of coke."



Arbogast: Yeah, there's nothing much more insu...

2010-02-02T18:28:56.984-08:00

Arbogast: Yeah, there's nothing much more insulting to a viewer's intelligence than seeing a flashback to something that only happened twenty minutes before. Least my version would delete that crap. My lowest moment is a spoiler, so I'll just say that it's another ham-fisted writerly neatner that makes zero connection with the real world and happens right at the end, there.

Otherwise: the problem that I have with both SLITHER and EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS is the penchant both scripts have to sacrifice an emotional relationship with their characters for "camp" comedy. To be sure this bugged me more in the former because I felt like the absence of my attachment to the characters defeated the horror of the situation in a way that nothing so subtle was necessary to make or break ...FREAKS. TREMORS got this particular thing right, in my opinion, and still stands for me as the best example of this kind of fake camp horror.



Jeez, Fred. Way to... sock it to me!

2010-02-02T17:52:42.756-08:00

Jeez, Fred. Way to... sock it to me!



I agree that Putney Swope hasn't aged well. W...

2010-02-02T17:00:02.547-08:00

I agree that Putney Swope hasn't aged well. While I enjoyed seeing it many years ago, I don't think most current audiences would find much to enjoy. I think a great deal of the late 60s satires haven't aged well and appear more dated than many older films. Similarly, I have found this with trying to watch re-runs of Laugh-In as compared to Monty Python (both were made at the same time and enjoyed popular success with their contemporary audiences), and how the latter is timeless while the former is pretty much unwatchable.



Mr. Cavin: My lowest moment in A Perfect Getaway ...

2010-02-02T16:57:35.816-08:00

Mr. Cavin: My lowest moment in A Perfect Getaway was that seemingly endless rolling-back-the-clock sequence in black-and-white, in which we are shown all the things the filmmakers assumed we were too stupid to suspect. Ugh. But the actors are all good and it was a semi-enjoyable lark.

JD: I meant to mention Slither, because if it weren't for that movie I probably would have liked Eight Legged Freaks more. And yet... I still suspect it would have let me down in the long run. It's humor was never really as anarchic as it promised, whereas Slither really went there.

Re: Putney Swope. I can't really defend the movie, I just like it. There were enough amusing moments to pay off the stuff I thought missed the mark or just left me shrugging my shoulders. I particularly liked the ads. I'm dying to see Pound.



I was excited to finally see Putney Swope when it ...

2010-02-02T14:16:38.012-08:00

I was excited to finally see Putney Swope when it popped up on Netflix Instant but was let down (sorry Temple dwellers). Not because it's dated because actually I think all good satire should be dated: specific to a specific time. Rather, I just didn't find it very well put together, even for a low budget.

And Mario never told us how many syllables. Never.



We still love PUTNEY SWOPE here at the Temple, and...

2010-02-02T14:00:46.638-08:00

We still love PUTNEY SWOPE here at the Temple, and usually get sucked in for the long haul if we get 10 minutes into it. It's nice to see someone else who isn't so quick to write it off as "dated" and move on.



For what it is, I enjoyed EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS, eve...

2010-02-02T13:21:20.374-08:00

For what it is, I enjoyed EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS, even if it is cribbing the comedy/horror vibe from TREMORS. I thought that the more recent SLITHER was much more successful, though. Plus, it had Nathan Fillion in it which ain't all that bad either!



I liked A PERFECT GETAWAY a lot more than you did,...

2010-02-02T12:43:06.033-08:00

I liked A PERFECT GETAWAY a lot more than you did, mostly based on the four main performances, which I thought were excellent (but I also really did go in cold, so there you go). I do hate a twist ending though, usually imagining that it limits any return appeal and cheapens the narrative structure to that of a joke and punchline.

I'd really like to see someone go back and recut this movie into a straightforward narrative, so the audience knows what's going on from the beginning. This would force the interesting aspects of the performances to the fore, enrich the duplicity and menace, and probably garner a lot of buzz about the new style of thriller storytelling honesty.

At least that's what I'd like to believe. Apparently, however, this knowing the trick from the beginning doesn't pay off either, huh? Is that because it turns even the first viewing into a return trip?